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Thread: I suck at job interviews/I hate my job and everyone sucks[MEGATHREAD?]

  1. #21
    Chakrai's Avatar
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    Last edited by Chakrai; April 24 2012 at 04:24:14 PM.
    She did what?

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by keiiko netsova View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by indi View Post
    Read some Dilbert books. I seriously got the best idea ever from that. Key is mentioning something that is a 'hidden strength' - like saying that you can be too demanding of your coworkers by setting p. high standards. Has always worked for me, possibly because it's true too.

    If that fails, go with something innocuous and fairly innocent. Example: you apply for something in project management, say that y ou are very good with the big picture, but could be more detail oriented, idk.
    You have to be careful with this. If you use "too demanding" (which isn't a weakness unless it's really "incapable of correctly judging colleagues' capabilities or what constitutes reasonable expectations") or "too hardworking (which isn't a weakness unless it is really "has no life outside work") people increasingly dismiss it as bullshit (because it is), and only some will be nice and ask again for a real one.

    Be honest about what your weaknesses, but most importantly, follow up with how you mitigate or compensate for it.
    its a bullshit question trough and trough just as "what is your strong sides?" is.
    how the fuck are you supposed to answer it in a reasonable manner ? what IS your weak side in the first place ? why is the individual even the right person to ask that question ?

    strengths and weaknesses are entirely relative to the situation that you find yourself in, what might be a strong side in one situation can be a massive weakness in another.
    Viking, n.:
    1. Daring Scandinavian seafarers, explorers, adventurers, entrepreneurs world-famous for their aggressive, nautical import business, highly leveraged takeovers and blue eyes.
    2. Bloodthirsty sea pirates who ravaged northern Europe beginning in the 9th century.

    Hagar's note: The first definition is much preferred; the second is used only by malcontents, the envious, and disgruntled owners of waterfront property.

  3. #23
    Movember '12 Best Facial Hair Movember 2012Donor Lallante's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Liare View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by keiiko netsova View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by indi View Post
    Read some Dilbert books. I seriously got the best idea ever from that. Key is mentioning something that is a 'hidden strength' - like saying that you can be too demanding of your coworkers by setting p. high standards. Has always worked for me, possibly because it's true too.

    If that fails, go with something innocuous and fairly innocent. Example: you apply for something in project management, say that y ou are very good with the big picture, but could be more detail oriented, idk.
    You have to be careful with this. If you use "too demanding" (which isn't a weakness unless it's really "incapable of correctly judging colleagues' capabilities or what constitutes reasonable expectations") or "too hardworking (which isn't a weakness unless it is really "has no life outside work") people increasingly dismiss it as bullshit (because it is), and only some will be nice and ask again for a real one.

    Be honest about what your weaknesses, but most importantly, follow up with how you mitigate or compensate for it.
    its a bullshit question trough and trough just as "what is your strong sides?" is.
    how the fuck are you supposed to answer it in a reasonable manner ? what IS your weak side in the first place ? why is the individual even the right person to ask that question ?

    strengths and weaknesses are entirely relative to the situation that you find yourself in, what might be a strong side in one situation can be a massive weakness in another.
    The funny thing is the main reason for these kinds of questions is to put you at ease, while getting to know you. They really aren't supposed to be hardcore, soul searching deciders.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Liare View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by keiiko netsova View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by indi View Post
    Read some Dilbert books. I seriously got the best idea ever from that. Key is mentioning something that is a 'hidden strength' - like saying that you can be too demanding of your coworkers by setting p. high standards. Has always worked for me, possibly because it's true too.

    If that fails, go with something innocuous and fairly innocent. Example: you apply for something in project management, say that y ou are very good with the big picture, but could be more detail oriented, idk.
    You have to be careful with this. If you use "too demanding" (which isn't a weakness unless it's really "incapable of correctly judging colleagues' capabilities or what constitutes reasonable expectations") or "too hardworking (which isn't a weakness unless it is really "has no life outside work") people increasingly dismiss it as bullshit (because it is), and only some will be nice and ask again for a real one.

    Be honest about what your weaknesses, but most importantly, follow up with how you mitigate or compensate for it.
    its a bullshit question trough and trough just as "what is your strong sides?" is.
    how the fuck are you supposed to answer it in a reasonable manner ? what IS your weak side in the first place ? why is the individual even the right person to ask that question ?

    strengths and weaknesses are entirely relative to the situation that you find yourself in, what might be a strong side in one situation can be a massive weakness in another.
    It is a bullshit question, but it can provide useful information.

    As an example - Weakness: easily bored, hate repetition. Compensating/mitigation: look for ways to automate repetition (incidentally can improve profitability), look for unusual trends over time, seek roles involving several concurrent projects rather than one continuous one.

    And yes, weaknesses can be strengths in the right situations. Which is why you talk about trying to put yourself into those situations as much as possible, which incidentally also shows that you're not afraid to take initiative.

    And of course an individual is the right person to ask. There's no way I'd want to employ someone who wasn't self aware or mature enough to recognise their own shortcomings or had not learned to deal with them.

  5. #25
    Donor Rans's Avatar
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    I try to get 2 interviews the same day. I always blow the 1st interview and I do better at the 2nd because I'm a bit more chill.

  6. #26
    Donor bundus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lallante View Post
    I'm pretty sure requiring social network login details would be illegal, at least in the UK. Its also utterly ridiculous.
    Fucking so much this.

    If people asked that of me I would ask them to kindly go to the kitchen and get a cup of go fuck yourself.
    Then I would publicly voice my concern over using such a thing to the media.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lallante View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Liare View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by keiiko netsova View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by indi View Post
    Read some Dilbert books. I seriously got the best idea ever from that. Key is mentioning something that is a 'hidden strength' - like saying that you can be too demanding of your coworkers by setting p. high standards. Has always worked for me, possibly because it's true too.

    If that fails, go with something innocuous and fairly innocent. Example: you apply for something in project management, say that y ou are very good with the big picture, but could be more detail oriented, idk.
    You have to be careful with this. If you use "too demanding" (which isn't a weakness unless it's really "incapable of correctly judging colleagues' capabilities or what constitutes reasonable expectations") or "too hardworking (which isn't a weakness unless it is really "has no life outside work") people increasingly dismiss it as bullshit (because it is), and only some will be nice and ask again for a real one.

    Be honest about what your weaknesses, but most importantly, follow up with how you mitigate or compensate for it.
    its a bullshit question trough and trough just as "what is your strong sides?" is.
    how the fuck are you supposed to answer it in a reasonable manner ? what IS your weak side in the first place ? why is the individual even the right person to ask that question ?

    strengths and weaknesses are entirely relative to the situation that you find yourself in, what might be a strong side in one situation can be a massive weakness in another.
    The funny thing is the main reason for these kinds of questions is to put you at ease, while getting to know you. They really aren't supposed to be hardcore, soul searching deciders.
    its not about the intent behind the question, but how the interviewee receives it, the intention might be to put people at ease, but for people like me it has the exact opposite effect, especially as we move away from what i feel is important (my qualifications, the details of the position) and into "huggy feely" territory where i dont really see the relevance or am terribly comfortable to "move into" when sitting across from a stranger, you want to hire me, i am on a temp contract the first three months so if it does not work you can toss me out the door, so lets focus on what's important rather than how i may or may not feel about myself and my abilities.

    strangest thing is people accept this kind of response, despite the fact it's a "none of your fucking business" in a politely worded manner.

    Quote Originally Posted by keiiko netsova View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Liare View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by keiiko netsova View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by indi View Post
    Read some Dilbert books. I seriously got the best idea ever from that. Key is mentioning something that is a 'hidden strength' - like saying that you can be too demanding of your coworkers by setting p. high standards. Has always worked for me, possibly because it's true too.

    If that fails, go with something innocuous and fairly innocent. Example: you apply for something in project management, say that y ou are very good with the big picture, but could be more detail oriented, idk.
    You have to be careful with this. If you use "too demanding" (which isn't a weakness unless it's really "incapable of correctly judging colleagues' capabilities or what constitutes reasonable expectations") or "too hardworking (which isn't a weakness unless it is really "has no life outside work") people increasingly dismiss it as bullshit (because it is), and only some will be nice and ask again for a real one.

    Be honest about what your weaknesses, but most importantly, follow up with how you mitigate or compensate for it.
    its a bullshit question trough and trough just as "what is your strong sides?" is.
    how the fuck are you supposed to answer it in a reasonable manner ? what IS your weak side in the first place ? why is the individual even the right person to ask that question ?

    strengths and weaknesses are entirely relative to the situation that you find yourself in, what might be a strong side in one situation can be a massive weakness in another.
    It is a bullshit question, but it can provide useful information.

    As an example - Weakness: easily bored, hate repetition. Compensating/mitigation: look for ways to automate repetition (incidentally can improve profitability), look for unusual trends over time, seek roles involving several concurrent projects rather than one continuous one.

    And yes, weaknesses can be strengths in the right situations. Which is why you talk about trying to put yourself into those situations as much as possible, which incidentally also shows that you're not afraid to take initiative.

    And of course an individual is the right person to ask. There's no way I'd want to employ someone who wasn't self aware or mature enough to recognise their own shortcomings or had not learned to deal with them.
    the individual is exactly the wrong person to ask if you want a honest answer to a question like that, precisely because you have zero interest in giving a non-bullshit, or non-spin answer to it.

    and if you dont want a honest answer, why ask ? if the entire point is to sound out how capable somebody might be in the bullshitting department there are better ways, if its a attempt to make the candidate more comfortable then you should fucking well read up on the type of candidate you're looking for, asking that kind of thing with that aim is never going to fly well in the "aspie heavy" sectors like IT and Engineering, but people keep fucking doing it.
    Viking, n.:
    1. Daring Scandinavian seafarers, explorers, adventurers, entrepreneurs world-famous for their aggressive, nautical import business, highly leveraged takeovers and blue eyes.
    2. Bloodthirsty sea pirates who ravaged northern Europe beginning in the 9th century.

    Hagar's note: The first definition is much preferred; the second is used only by malcontents, the envious, and disgruntled owners of waterfront property.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by bundus View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Lallante View Post
    I'm pretty sure requiring social network login details would be illegal, at least in the UK. Its also utterly ridiculous.
    Fucking so much this.

    If people asked that of me I would ask them to kindly go to the kitchen and get a cup of go fuck yourself.
    Then I would publicly voice my concern over using such a thing to the media.
    http://www.usatoday.com/tech/news/st...ook/53665606/1


  9. #29
    Donor bundus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Takon Orlani View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by bundus View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Lallante View Post
    I'm pretty sure requiring social network login details would be illegal, at least in the UK. Its also utterly ridiculous.
    Fucking so much this.

    If people asked that of me I would ask them to kindly go to the kitchen and get a cup of go fuck yourself.
    Then I would publicly voice my concern over using such a thing to the media.
    http://www.usatoday.com/tech/news/st...ook/53665606/1

    Yeah absolutely, it breaks terms of service on the site side of things.
    It is discrimination and illegal in other ways as well, at least here in glorious Australistan

  10. #30
    Al Simmons's Avatar
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    Applying for jobs. Every job wants 1 year plus of relevant experience, I don't have it. Can't get experience without already having experience, catch 22 much?

    I don't even think someone would hire me for some manual labour job that doesn't need experience as my CV clearly shows i'm not very motivated or hardworking at all. Oh boy this is a lot of fun.

  11. #31
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    I have only had a half dozen interviews, but I have been able to get a job offer out of every single one. I handle interviews a little differently than most people. I've also been involved in interviewing other people, for what it's worth.

    1. When I go to an interview, it isn't because I want the company to interview me. I want to interview the company. Reading up on a place beforehand helps, but being there and talking to people helps a lot.

    2. Bring a list of questions you want answered. Ask about working conditions, who you might be working under, what kind of on boarding processes the place has, stuff like that. And I say bring a list because it's easy to have stuff in your head and then have it fall out during the interview. Don't ever walk into a room and say, "Uh, so, what does this company do anyway?" If the company has been in the news lately then ask about it!

    3. Unless you're unemployed, you have nothing to lose by going to an interview. So don't worry about it. If you don't get the job then you still have your current job / mom's basement to fall back on. So don't stress it. You don't have to be all super-confident or anything, but if you come across as a pussy it's hard to get hired. Laid back bros = best bros.

    4. I'm in the IT industry, and interviews ALWAYS contain questions about technology / development / etc. I'm never afraid to say "I don't know." It's WAY better to say "I don't know" than to try to bullshit your way through for a lot of reasons (you know you're limits, you're willing to learn, you're not a know-it-all cock). Bonus points if you say "I don't know, but could you explain it to me?"

    4.1 Also realize that some people ask trick questions because they like to dick with you. Other people ask trick questions to see how you handle difficult problems. Companies with the first kind of interviewer are douchey. Companies with the second kind of interviewer have potential.

    5. Dress to Impress, but know the culture you're walking into. You wouldn't wear nice pants and a button-down shirt to an interview with a bank; you wouldn't wear a full suit, complete with cufflinks, to some dot-com startup. I once had a girl show up in her prom dress. No joke. When in doubt, "Business Casual" (nice pants, nice shirt / tie, sport jacket) is usually fine. Not so fancy that dot-com will laugh, not so underdressed that a bank will throw you out right away. And make sure the clothes fit.

    6. I never talk about salary during the interview. It's not wrong to ask about money, but I figure that's the job of Human Resources and not the people interviewing you (unless it's HR doing the interview). Some people think you're a greedy asshole if you ask about money on the first date. At the very least, don't bring it up yourself. Let the other guy do it.

    7. SHAVE, TAKE A SHOWER, BRUSH YOUR TEETH. Jesus christ - I will repeat - SHAVE, TAKE A SHOWER, BRUSH YOUR TEETH. Don't do that retarded three-day stubble thing, even if brain-dead teenage girls swoon over them. Beards are cool, just keep it trim (unless you're a UNIX admin). And, unless you're going for a company with a super liberal culture, take out any massive ear plugs, bones through the nose, safety pins in cheeks, etc. Basically, try to look somewhat professional and not like a douchebag.

    8. Send a short "thank you" email or something after the interview. Yeah, it might be a little old fashioned and perhaps corny, but it doesn't hurt and it puts your name in front of someone one more time. All things equal, would you rather work with someone polite or an asshole?

    9. Don't badmouth your current employer during the interview. It's really bad form. They're going to ask you why you're leaving your current employer (if you have one) - come up with your answer ahead of time. You can be honest without coming across as a dick. "There aren't enough opportunities for advancement" vs. "Bastards won't give me that management role I keep asking for."

    10. References matter, especially if you can get a former boss to vouch for you. Don't be a dick - ask people if you can list them as references, and give them a heads up after an interview so they know they might get a phone call.

    Also, glassdoor.com can be a good resource. Last year I went to interview for a development position at Amazon (I was offered 100k+ salary plus a damn nice signing package, but I didn't take it - the people I would have worked with are self important ass-licking shitfucks - I'd rather make less but work with nicer people), and a majority of the "Dance Monkey, Dance" questions were on there. It was pretty helpful in getting prepared for the interview and I learned some good stuff along the way. Gives unfiltered reports on the work conditions, compensation, etc., which helps you decide if you want to interview there in the first place and gives you some starting points for questions.

    It also never hurts to ask for the business cards / phone numbers of the people who interview you. They're useful if you come up with an important question after the interview Most people are totally cool with giving you that stuff. It's also not out of line to ask when they expect to fill the position. If you don't hear anything after a few weeks, call someone up and ask if the position has been filled.

  12. #32
    NoirAvlaa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Al Simmons View Post
    Applying for jobs. Every job wants 1 year plus of relevant experience, I don't have it. Can't get experience without already having experience, catch 22 much?

    I don't even think someone would hire me for some manual labour job that doesn't need experience as my CV clearly shows i'm not very motivated or hardworking at all. Oh boy this is a lot of fun.
    What area you looking for? If it's stuff relating to IT it might be an idea to just aim at data entry roles and then volunteer in that company's IT department once a week/for an hour after each shift etc. I know a few people who have done that and it's put them in very good standing with the company, given them a good reference and they've been able to gain the relevant experience to put on their CV after a year.

    Same applies for other areas, just aim at entry level, no qualification positions and then volunteer and be pro once you're there... Good ideas do actually get recognised in my experience.

  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by NoirAvlaa View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Al Simmons View Post
    Applying for jobs. Every job wants 1 year plus of relevant experience, I don't have it. Can't get experience without already having experience, catch 22 much?

    I don't even think someone would hire me for some manual labour job that doesn't need experience as my CV clearly shows i'm not very motivated or hardworking at all. Oh boy this is a lot of fun.
    What area you looking for? If it's stuff relating to IT it might be an idea to just aim at data entry roles and then volunteer in that company's IT department once a week/for an hour after each shift etc. I know a few people who have done that and it's put them in very good standing with the company, given them a good reference and they've been able to gain the relevant experience to put on their CV after a year.

    Same applies for other areas, just aim at entry level, no qualification positions and then volunteer and be pro once you're there... Good ideas do actually get recognised in my experience.
    I guess so. Yeah, i'm probably heading towards IT stuff really as it's the only thing i'm mildly good at, and I have a couple of small qualifications and courses done in it.

    I don't really know that I want to actually do IT as a career because it seems like you get shit on a lot, and it won't help me with my fitness heh, but like I said I can't really think of anything else i'm good at. Data entry though, jesus. I'm pretty bad at doing a routine especially boring stuff I hate. I don't know how long I could stomach a job like that.

  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Al Simmons View Post
    I don't really know that I want to actually do IT as a career because it seems like you get shit on a lot.
    You do. IT work is, quite frankly, pretty shitty a lot of the time, boring as fuck, and you're never NOT working (3am phone calls, worst phone calls). Every once in a while there's an exception to that rule, but don't count on it. Everyone I know who LIKES working in IT has only been doing it for a year or two. Everyone else who has been in it for 3-4+ years basically tolerates it because it brings in a paycheck.

  15. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by NoirAvlaa View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Al Simmons View Post
    Applying for jobs. Every job wants 1 year plus of relevant experience, I don't have it. Can't get experience without already having experience, catch 22 much?

    I don't even think someone would hire me for some manual labour job that doesn't need experience as my CV clearly shows i'm not very motivated or hardworking at all. Oh boy this is a lot of fun.
    What area you looking for? If it's stuff relating to IT it might be an idea to just aim at data entry roles and then volunteer in that company's IT department once a week/for an hour after each shift etc. I know a few people who have done that and it's put them in very good standing with the company, given them a good reference and they've been able to gain the relevant experience to put on their CV after a year.

    Same applies for other areas, just aim at entry level, no qualification positions and then volunteer and be pro once you're there... Good ideas do actually get recognised in my experience.
    yep, if you want work in a IT department show some relevant experience first, even if its a stint at a call-centre somewhere doing tech support for users then that's fine, it shows a ability to deal with the "user classes" and a certain insight into how things work.
    most IT departments are run on shoestring and duct tape, they cant and wont take a chance with a candidate because the risks involved with taking a complete greenhorn in does not outweigh the benefits.

    its one of the reasons i love the way the "IT dept. bloke" education is put togather the way it is in this country, its viewed less as a "bookish" academical education and more in line with a traditional craftsman such as carpenter, blacksmith and so forth, so your Apprenticeship shapes your education and gives you "hands on" contact with things right off.

    working in a IT department is only about 30% technology, the rest is people and politics.
    Viking, n.:
    1. Daring Scandinavian seafarers, explorers, adventurers, entrepreneurs world-famous for their aggressive, nautical import business, highly leveraged takeovers and blue eyes.
    2. Bloodthirsty sea pirates who ravaged northern Europe beginning in the 9th century.

    Hagar's note: The first definition is much preferred; the second is used only by malcontents, the envious, and disgruntled owners of waterfront property.

  16. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Al Simmons View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by NoirAvlaa View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Al Simmons View Post
    Applying for jobs. Every job wants 1 year plus of relevant experience, I don't have it. Can't get experience without already having experience, catch 22 much?

    I don't even think someone would hire me for some manual labour job that doesn't need experience as my CV clearly shows i'm not very motivated or hardworking at all. Oh boy this is a lot of fun.
    What area you looking for? If it's stuff relating to IT it might be an idea to just aim at data entry roles and then volunteer in that company's IT department once a week/for an hour after each shift etc. I know a few people who have done that and it's put them in very good standing with the company, given them a good reference and they've been able to gain the relevant experience to put on their CV after a year.

    Same applies for other areas, just aim at entry level, no qualification positions and then volunteer and be pro once you're there... Good ideas do actually get recognised in my experience.
    I guess so. Yeah, i'm probably heading towards IT stuff really as it's the only thing i'm mildly good at, and I have a couple of small qualifications and courses done in it.

    I don't really know that I want to actually do IT as a career because it seems like you get shit on a lot, and it won't help me with my fitness heh, but like I said I can't really think of anything else i'm good at. Data entry though, jesus. I'm pretty bad at doing a routine especially boring stuff I hate. I don't know how long I could stomach a job like that.
    I'm doing data entry at the moment while I'm at uni (I quit my last job to go to uni, now this job lets me do full time over summer and part time in Uni ) It's not all that bad, it depends on the people you work with. I work in a company that promotes people talking to each other, allows you to bring in cakes to chow down on etc and it's one of the best places I've worked. My job is fuck boring but I actually enjoy it because of the atmosphere in the office and the people I work with.

    Also: Just do it while you figure out an end goal. Start it, look into what sort of courses they'll put you on if you show enough interest etc, a lot of companies will put extra free training on as part of the package, or at least accommodate you if you want to do night courses. Or maybe I've just been lucky with employers

  17. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrea Griffin View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Al Simmons View Post
    I don't really know that I want to actually do IT as a career because it seems like you get shit on a lot.
    You do. IT work is, quite frankly, pretty shitty a lot of the time, boring as fuck, and you're never NOT working (3am phone calls, worst phone calls). Every once in a while there's an exception to that rule, but don't count on it. Everyone I know who LIKES working in IT has only been doing it for a year or two. Everyone else who has been in it for 3-4+ years basically tolerates it because it brings in a paycheck.
    bollocks, been active since 2000, wrapped my education up in 2006 and been full time ever since.

    i both hate and love my job, it gives immense feedback and there's a incredible amount of responsibility attached to it, while its often the most reviled company department (except perhaps Accounting and/or HR) its also one of the most important, simply put if we where to put down our tools and walk out the door, everything grinds to a screeching halt within 96 hours.

    granted, the long hours can and does get to people and the 3AM phone calls have gotten me treatning to hand in a notice with a previous employer but its part of the job.

    now if you work in a shitty place, its just going to be a paycheck, but find the right company and it's plain awesome, a word of advice though, if the IT department is larger than 15 people, walk away.
    Viking, n.:
    1. Daring Scandinavian seafarers, explorers, adventurers, entrepreneurs world-famous for their aggressive, nautical import business, highly leveraged takeovers and blue eyes.
    2. Bloodthirsty sea pirates who ravaged northern Europe beginning in the 9th century.

    Hagar's note: The first definition is much preferred; the second is used only by malcontents, the envious, and disgruntled owners of waterfront property.

  18. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Liare View Post
    now if you work in a shitty place, its just going to be a paycheck, but find the right company and it's plain awesome, a word of advice though, if the IT department is larger than 15 people, walk away.
    My company does web development / email hosting / single sign-on / TV authentication / etc. We're mostly IT here. : >

  19. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrea Griffin View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Liare View Post
    now if you work in a shitty place, its just going to be a paycheck, but find the right company and it's plain awesome, a word of advice though, if the IT department is larger than 15 people, walk away.
    My company does web development / email hosting / single sign-on / TV authentication / etc. We're mostly IT here. : >
    try to look beyond the bitterness that comes with the job :P

    a lot of the people who claim they hate the blasted stuff willingly go the extra mile to make sure everything is "perfect", you dont do that for shit'n'giggles.
    Viking, n.:
    1. Daring Scandinavian seafarers, explorers, adventurers, entrepreneurs world-famous for their aggressive, nautical import business, highly leveraged takeovers and blue eyes.
    2. Bloodthirsty sea pirates who ravaged northern Europe beginning in the 9th century.

    Hagar's note: The first definition is much preferred; the second is used only by malcontents, the envious, and disgruntled owners of waterfront property.

  20. #40
    Donor bundus's Avatar
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    April 25, 2011
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    I work in Hospitality, specifically Hotels in Front Office. I make things go smoothly(manager)
    This is an easy gig if you can talk to people and can operate a computer, anyone can do it basically and there are heaps of entry level alternatives if you want to get your foot in the door.
    I get paid alright and it gets better the period of time you are with the brand/hotel.
    Best thing is travel. I have lived all around Australia working in hotels from the Whitsunday Islands in the Great Barrier Reef to Falls Creek in the Snowfields of Victoria. They basically pay you to have a good time and have an adventure and in unique places like that mostly accommodation is provided with meals(or at a subsidy).
    I get to meet bands and celebritys and have a chat or on quiet nights/days just chill and relax after doing my checklist.

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