hate these ads?, log in or register to hide them
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 28 of 28

Thread: $4,829-per-hour supercomputer built on Amazon cloud

  1. #21
    fuck entrox Donor Jason Marshall's Avatar
    Join Date
    April 12, 2011
    Location
    Civilization
    Posts
    7,942
    STAY THE FUCK ON TOPIC.

    This thread is about the fucking article and related material...DIRECTLY RELATED.

    "Sometimes someone just needs to be the OP" -Tellenta Philosopher of our People.

  2. #22

    Join Date
    April 9, 2011
    Posts
    744
    I often wonder if stuff like this is what will usher in a spontaneous AI.

    Ponder ponder.

    Impressive achievement.

  3. #23
    Paradox's Avatar
    Join Date
    December 24, 2011
    Location
    Deepest Darkest Devonshire
    Posts
    8,179
    Quote Originally Posted by Azure View Post
    I often wonder if stuff like this is what will usher in a spontaneous AI.

    Ponder ponder.

    Impressive achievement.
    Not a cat in hell's chance for many many good reasons

  4. #24

    Join Date
    April 9, 2011
    Posts
    744
    Quote Originally Posted by Paradox View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Azure View Post
    I often wonder if stuff like this is what will usher in a spontaneous AI.

    Ponder ponder.

    Impressive achievement.
    Not a cat in hell's chance for many many good reasons
    Care to expand? Genuine interest.

    Brains are just networks of individually dumb elements but mash enough of them together and give them the ability to make and break their connections with each other and you have a mind. There are far fewer computers in the world than an average human brain has neurons but each individual computer is far "smarter" than a neuron and the interwebs has the ability to switch connections because thats what it's designed to do.

    Surely there are parallels?

  5. #25
    Donor erichkknaar's Avatar
    Join Date
    April 10, 2011
    Posts
    13,845
    Quote Originally Posted by indeterminacy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by kzig View Post
    I wonder how the economics of this compare to the likes of folding@home?
    The economics of Amazon's computing service are terrible Granted, a node-hour may seem cheap but they nickle and dime users on I/O charges and network charges both coming and going.

    We run HPC services like this for far, far cheaper rates. But, we're not amazon so we're less hip and I'd guess hundreds of thousands of research dollars are wasted every year (perhaps more) by researchers here on those nickle and dime charges due to sheer ignorance / a need to be edgy. Besides, "big computing" is pretty dead in the HPC world. The real problem in the last couple of years and going forward is data. The growth in the volume of data being generated by every type of sensor you can imagine, transmitted, and stored is outstripping current technology.
    Based on my calcs, the break even (for permanently running, i.e. reserved instances) is about 300 vms. At this point, assuming you have the technical aptitude, its cheaper to invest in your own private cloud. Of course, this is based on 24/7 usage. For a utility model, AWS is tough to beat, but yeah. Hope fully you don't have any storage intensive requirements.

    Of course, I might be a little biased. Just got home from the OpenStack conference. Tis' the future.
    meh

  6. #26
    Mrenda's Avatar
    Join Date
    April 9, 2011
    Posts
    3,463
    Quote Originally Posted by indeterminacy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by kzig View Post
    I wonder how the economics of this compare to the likes of folding@home?
    The economics of Amazon's computing service are terrible Granted, a node-hour may seem cheap but they nickle and dime users on I/O charges and network charges both coming and going.

    We run HPC services like this for far, far cheaper rates. But, we're not amazon so we're less hip and I'd guess hundreds of thousands of research dollars are wasted every year (perhaps more) by researchers here on those nickle and dime charges due to sheer ignorance / a need to be edgy. Besides, "big computing" is pretty dead in the HPC world. The real problem in the last couple of years and going forward is data. The growth in the volume of data being generated by every type of sensor you can imagine, transmitted, and stored is outstripping current technology.
    In my masters I had a lecturer who worked the highest level tech support for EMC (he mainly told people to turn it off and on again) and he was all about data. Basically told everyone that if you wanted to make money you should go into storage.

  7. #27
    Donor erichkknaar's Avatar
    Join Date
    April 10, 2011
    Posts
    13,845
    Quote Originally Posted by Buceph View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by indeterminacy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by kzig View Post
    I wonder how the economics of this compare to the likes of folding@home?
    The economics of Amazon's computing service are terrible Granted, a node-hour may seem cheap but they nickle and dime users on I/O charges and network charges both coming and going.

    We run HPC services like this for far, far cheaper rates. But, we're not amazon so we're less hip and I'd guess hundreds of thousands of research dollars are wasted every year (perhaps more) by researchers here on those nickle and dime charges due to sheer ignorance / a need to be edgy. Besides, "big computing" is pretty dead in the HPC world. The real problem in the last couple of years and going forward is data. The growth in the volume of data being generated by every type of sensor you can imagine, transmitted, and stored is outstripping current technology.
    In my masters I had a lecturer who worked the highest level tech support for EMC (he mainly told people to turn it off and on again) and he was all about data. Basically told everyone that if you wanted to make money you should go into storage.
    He's not wrong, but there are a couple of disruptive technologies starting up in this space too. I long for the day I don't have to pay my EMC tax.
    meh

  8. #28
    Paradox's Avatar
    Join Date
    December 24, 2011
    Location
    Deepest Darkest Devonshire
    Posts
    8,179
    Quote Originally Posted by Azure View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Paradox View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Azure View Post
    I often wonder if stuff like this is what will usher in a spontaneous AI.

    Ponder ponder.

    Impressive achievement.
    Not a cat in hell's chance for many many good reasons
    Care to expand? Genuine interest.

    Brains are just networks of individually dumb elements but mash enough of them together and give them the ability to make and break their connections with each other and you have a mind. There are far fewer computers in the world than an average human brain has neurons but each individual computer is far "smarter" than a neuron and the interwebs has the ability to switch connections because thats what it's designed to do.

    Surely there are parallels?
    Hardware aside software doesn't work in the same way as memory does, a memory or engram can be altered by other engrams with chemical reactions eventually resulting in things like priorities or learned behaviours all the way up to full on intelligent thought, that's the advantage of a biological brain. In the case of a piece of software, if one bit changes from it's original format a processor can't do anything with it and the process doesn't happen. Software can only ever be edited by a person or a peice of software designed to edit software to make it readable by a CPU (or in the case of a lot of newer supercomputers a GPGPU)

    In short, an engram can change as much as it likes and it's still compatible with neurons, if a piece of software changes it can't be read anymore, we call that corruption.

    In hardware terms, brains and computers are only roughly analogous, you *CAN* Emulate a biological brain with a computer (an incredibly powerful computer) but with current technology there's no way it can "learn" in the same way that we do because software doesn't behave anything like a biological engram.

    What we can do is emulate intelligence with programs designed to modify themselves to react to situations it encounters, our very own Quackbot is an example, but Quackbot can't be sentient because he can only ever react to situations that he's given along strictly defined rules, rules that probably wouldn't make sense if he tried to edit them according to his experiences.

    Emulating intelligence is a lot easier than actually being intelligent. And artificial intelligence follows different rules. One of the major issues we have in AI research is that no-one really quite knows why humans are intelligent so emulating human engrams in software is hard because engrams are only hypothetical "containers" for biochemical memories.

    Sorry this took a while to get back to you on, I went to bed early yesterday.

    I hope I'm right in this, I'd very much like to be corrected by someone who knows anything about this field, I get my knowledge second hand from a friend of mine currently doing a masters degree in computer science, specialising in emulating intelligence and programming for GPGPUs.

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •