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Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #2741
    dpidcoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paradox View Post
    That sounds a lot more interesting than the frankly terrible Battletech books I've been reading for the last few months.
    Literally anything is better than battletech books. I tried to read a few of them and the authors had some real issues with describing each hit from each mech in excruciating detail, which would have been ok, except that they ran out of unique words with which to do so after about 3 pages in.
    i heard you're ideas and their definately good

  2. #2742
    pratell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thebomby View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Thorjak View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by pratell View Post
    Just finished Consider Phlebas, was pretty bored throughout the entirety of it. Characters were dull, everything happened for boring reasons, and on top of that the author didn't write terribly well. After the first few times I got stuck on an awkward sentence that turned out to not be very interesting anyway I just moved on. Should I bother reading Banks's other books?
    yes

    Phlebas is the worst of the culture series by some way, but it sets up look to windward. The next one (Player of Games) is much better.
    There might be the occasional person, i.e. me, who disagrees with this. Consider Phlebas I found excellent.

    Busy re-reading The Book of the New Sun by Gene Wolfe. A true classic, by any measure.
    Consider Phlebas said nothing. The main theme of the book is nihilism and the idea that shit just doesn't matter, and I shouldn't have had to spend 300 pages of reading time for the author to tell me "hello friend here's this war set in an incredibly interesting setting but turns out that not only does the war not matter on the large scale but these characters involved in this specific incident are also irrelevant, even relative to each other!"

    On the other hand, Book of the New Sun is my favorite and thus best sci fi book(s) written.
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  3. #2743
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    Finished Forever Free, sequel to The Forever War. I enjoyed most of it, although it definitely wasn't the second coming of the first book. I was okay with that, expecting it to be as good as the first would've been like expecting lightning to strike the same shark-bitten lottery winner twice, so I was willing to settle for the merely great or even just good. That's what I was getting for most of the book...until the end.

      Spoiler:
    That was an even worse case of "a space wizard did it" than the Night's Dawn trilogy. Why has everyone on multiple planets disappeared? God did it and now he's killing the remaining few people in random and messy ways? There's a shape-shifting species that's been living amongst Humans and Taurans for millennia and only gets a few chapters of screen time? What the fuck, Haldeman?

    Going to read some other stories of his, we'll see if he ends up being another one-hit-wonder or if this particular incident was anomalous.
    Last edited by Dahak; December 28 2013 at 05:19:02 AM.

  4. #2744
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    For anyone who doubts Iain Banks, here is perhaps my favourite passage of pros out of all of Sci Fi, and perhaps literature. It's from the Culture Novel: Matter.
      Spoiler:
    warning, it's half a chapter long.
      Spoiler:

    10. A Certain Lack
    She had been a man for a year.

    That had been different. Everything had been different. She had learned so much: about herself, about people, about civilisations.

    Time: she came to think in Standard years, eventually. To her, at first, they were about one and a half short-years or very roughly half a long-year.

    Gravity: she felt intolerably heavy and worryingly fragile at once. A treatment she had already agreed to started to thicken her bones and reduce her height before she left the Eighth, but even so, for the time she was on the ship that took her from the Surface and during the first fifty days or so after her arrival, she towered over most people and felt oddly delicate. Allegedly, the new clothes she had chosen had been reinforced to save her from breaking any bones if she fell badly in the stronger gravity. She had assumed this was a lie to make her feel less frightened, and just took care instead.

    Only the measures of human-scale length were roughly as she knew them; strides were near enough metres, and she already thought in kilometres, even if she’d grown up with ten raised to the power of three rather than two to the power of ten.

    But that was just the start of it.

    For the first couple of years after arriving in the Culture she had been simply as she was, save for that amendment of thickening and shortening. Meanwhile she got to know the Culture and it got to know her. She learned a lot, about everything. The drone Turminder Xuss had accompanied her from the day she’d stepped from the ship she’d arrived on, the space vessel called Lightly Seared on the Reality Grill (she found their ships’ names absurd, childish and ridiculous at first, then got used to them, then thought she kind of understood them, then realised there was no understanding the Mind of a ship, and went back to finding them annoying). The drone answered any questions she had and sometimes talked on her behalf.

    Those first three years had been spent on the Orbital Gadampth, mostly on the part called Lesuus, in a sort of extended, teased-out city built on a group of islands scattered across a wide bay on the edge of a small inland sea. The city was named Klusse, and it had some similarities to an ordinary city, despite being much cleaner and lacking any curtain walls or other defensive components that she could discern. Mostly, though, it seemed to be a sort of vast Scholastery.

    It took her some time to work out why, as she went walking about the boulevards, terraces, promenades and piazzas of the place, she had felt — not initially, but gradually, just when she ought to have felt herself getting used to the place — an odd mixture of comfort and disturbance at the same time. Eventually she realised it was because in all the faces that she saw there, not one held a disfiguring tumour or had been eaten half away by disease. She had yet to see even a mildly disfiguring skin condition or a lazy eye. Similarly, in all the bodies she moved among, not one was limping or supporting itself on a crutch or trolley, or went hobbling past on a club foot. And not a single madman, not one poor defective standing flecked screaming on a street corner howling at the stars.

    She hadn’t appreciated this at first because at the time she was still being amazed at the sheer bewildering physical variation of the people around her, but once she had become used to that, she started to notice that although there was near infinite physical variety here, there was no deformity, and while there was prodigious eccentricity, no dementia. There were more facial, bodily and personality types than she could have imagined, but they were all the product of health and choice, not disease and fate. Everyone was, or could be if they so desired, beautiful in both form and character.

    Later she would find that, as this was the Culture after all, of course there were people who embraced ugliness and even the appearance of deformity or mutilation just to be different or to express something inside that they felt ought to be broadcast to their peers; however — once she had passed over her initial sense of irritation and exasperation at such people (did they not, even if unknowingly, mock those truly afflicted, those with no choice in how hideous they looked?) — she realised that even that deliberate adoption of unsightliness displayed a kind of societal confidence, a thumbing of the collective nose at the workings of crude providence and the ancient tyranny, now itself long overthrown, of genetic aberration, gross injury and transmissible pestilence.

    * * *
    A star named Aoud shone down upon the ten-million-kilometre bracelet of the Orbital. This sun was what everybody else seemed to regard as a real star; one which had been naturally formed. To her it sounded incredibly old and absurdly, almost wastefully enormous.

    There, in Klusse, she learned about the history of the Culture and the story of the galaxy itself. She learned about the other civilisations that she had been taught as a child were called the Optimae. They generally referred to themselves as the Involveds or the In-Play, though the terms were loose and there was no exact equivalent of the Sarl word Optimae, with its implication of supremacy. “High-level Involved” was probably as close as you could get.

    She also learned pretty much all there was to be learned about her own people, the Sarl: their long-ago evolution on a faraway planet of the same name, their involvement in a terrible war, their condemnation, exile and displacement (partly for their own good, partly for that of the peoples they had shared that original planet with; the consensus was that they would either kill everybody else or be killed) and their eventual sanctuary/internment in Sursamen under the auspices of the Galactic Council, the Morthanveld and Nariscene. This version felt like the truth, she thought; close enough to the myths and legends of her own people, but less self-serving, less dramatically glorious, more equivocal in its moral implications.

    This area of study turned up surprising details. The fact that the Deldeyn and the Sarl were the same people, for example; the Deldeyn were a sub-group of the main population who had been transported to the level below by the Oct over a thousand years ago. And the Oct had done this without permission from their Nariscene mentors; that level, while once supporting many peoples, had seen them all evacuated millennia ago and was supposed to have been left empty of intelligent life until further notice. The Oct had been forced to apologise, undertake never to do such a thing again and pay reparations in the form of surrendered influence elsewhere; however, the unauthorised movement of people had finally, reluctantly, been accepted as a accompli.
    She learned about pan-humanity, about the great diasporic welter of human-like, human-ish and humanoid species scattered throughout so much of the galaxy.

    She learned about the present sociopolitical set-up that existed in the galaxy and felt a sort of widespread satisfaction that there was just so much of it, and almost all of it peaceful. There were millions of species, hundreds of different types of species, even casting one’s definition wide, and that was without taking into account civilisations that were composed more of machines than biological beings at all. Ultimately the galaxy, indeed the sum of the universe in its entirety, was mostly nothing; average it all out and it made a pretty good vacuum. But within the foci of matter that were the systems, the stars and planets and habitats — what a cornucopia of life was there!

    There were bogglingly large numbers just of these pan-humans (of which, of course, she was one), but they still formed less than a single per cent of all the aggregated life-mass of the greater galaxy. Also, where they did exist, men and women were mostly — most places, most of the time — equals. In the Culture this was even guaranteed by birthright; you could be whatever gender you wished — just by thinking about it! She found this highly satisfactory, and a kind of vindication.

    Life buzzed in, fumed about, rattled around and quite thoroughly infested the entire galaxy, and probably — almost certainly — well beyond. The vast ongoingness of it all somehow put all one’s own petty concerns and worries into context, making them seem not irrelevant, but of much less distressing immediacy. Context was indeed all, as her father had always insisted, but the greater context she was learning about acted to shrink the vast-seeming scale of the Eighth Level of Sursamen and all its wars, politics, disputes, struggles, tribulations and vexations until it all looked very far away and trivial indeed.

    She learned about Contact, the part of the Culture that went out to discover and interact with other civilisations, especially new and fast-developing ones, and about its slightly scurrilous, tentatively raffish, arguably shadowy division called Special Circumstances. It was some time before she realised that she herself was expected to have at least a chance of becoming part of this prestigious, if not entirely respectable organisation. This was, she gathered, supposed to be a most singular and unusual honour and almost the only worthwhile distinction the Culture had to offer that was not available on demand. However, she was, again, instantly suspicious.

    For some time the aspect of Orbital life she marvelled at more than anything else was the geography: mountains, cliffs and gorges, pinnacles, scree and boulder fields. That none of it was truly natural, that it had all been designed and manufactured from debris found in the solar system when the world was made only added to her amazement. She hiked the high mountains and learned to ski. She took part in various sports and discovered she even enjoyed being part of a team. She hadn’t expected that, somehow.

    She had made friends and taken lovers, when she had grown to believe that her new, squat self was not hideous. Not all pairings worked, even, as it were, mechanically — there was a wide variety of body shapes. Another treatment she chose monitored her womb, to alert her on the very low off-chance that she mated with somebody her own physical system found sufficiently compatible for her to conceive by. She had wondered if this was not a lie, too, but nothing ever happened.

    She played with her own dreams, and took part in shared dreams that were vast games, using nothing more exotic-seeming than special pillows or nightcaps to access these strange sub-realities. She realised that she slept much more than most of her friends, missing out on a potential part of waking life. She asked for another treatment, which solved that problem as though it had never existed; she slept deeply for a few hours each of these clockworkly regular and dependable nights and awoke thoroughly refreshed each morning.

    She took part in other semi-hallucinatory experiences that seemed like games but which she knew were also lessons and evaluations, submerging her entirely conscious self into simulations of reality that were sometimes based on real, earlier events and experiences, and sometimes were as entirely deliberately created as the Orbital and its amazingly vertiginous landscape. Some left her troubled to know the terrible things people — pan-humans and beyond, but all people — could do to each other. The implication, though, was that such ghastliness was an affliction, and could be at least partially cured. The Culture represented the hospital, or perhaps a whole caring society, Contact was the physician and SC the anaesthetic and the medicine. Sometimes the scalpel.

    Almost the only aspect of her new life that she adapted to without pause for thought was the total absence of money in the Culture. She had been a princess, after all, and so was perfectly used to that.

    She watched some of her friends enter states she could not share, and, after great initial wariness, asked for more treatments that caused glands in her body she hadn’t even known she possessed to alter over a few tens of days until she possessed a simple drug-gland suite inside her head and a modest choice of mixtures of trace chemicals she could now choose to release into her bloodstream and brain whenever she wanted.

    That had been interesting.

    Amongst the Sarl, at least on the Eighth, every drug had at least one unwanted and unpleasant side effect. Here; nothing. You got what you wanted, no more. She remained highly sceptical, unconvinced such light was possible without shade. She no longer needed the drone Turminder Xuss, who went off to tend to others. She used a finger-ring terminal to connect with the dataverse instead.

    She began to collect amendments, treatments, as one might accumulate jewellery. She even had a couple of treatments rescinded, just removed from her altogether, simply to make sure that the processes truly were fully reversible. A new tutor, one who was present only rarely but seemed in some sense senior to the others, a bush-like being who had once been a man, called Batra, sounded amused when he/it said she was a suspicious child. Amused and somehow approving. She got the feeling she was supposed to feel flattered, but she’d been more concerned about the mild insult contained in the word “child”.

    People shifted, went away, relationships ended. She asked one of her female mentors about how one changed from female to male. Another treatment. Over most of a year she grew slightly, bulked out further, grew hair in strange places, and watched, fascinated, as her genitals went from fissure to spire. She did wake up a couple of nights covered in sweat, appalled at what was happening to her, feeling herself, wondering if this was all some enormously laboured joke and she was being made a freak of deliberately, for sport, but there were always people to talk to who had been through the same experience — both in person and via screens and sims — and no shortage of archived material to explain and reassure.

    She kept a couple of intermittent, unbothered lovers even as she changed, then, as a man, took many more, mostly female. It was true: one made a better, more considerate lover when one had once been as one’s partner. He woke up one morning after a strenuous night with a small group of old friends and just-mets, blinking in the sunshine of a brilliant new day, looking out over a broad balcony and a sparkling sea to a great columnar mountain that reminded him of a Tower back home, and woke everybody else up with his laughter.

    He was never sure why he decided to change back. For a long time he thought to return to Sursamen as a man, see what they made of him then. Apart from anything else, there had been a couple of ladies at the court he had always been fond of, and now felt something more for. By that point he knew his brother Elime had been killed and he was the eldest child of the King; the next king, indeed, if you looked at it in a certain way. He might return, claim the throne, in time. By then, with further treatments, he might have martial skills and attributes beyond those of any warrior who had ever lived on the Eighth. He’d be unstoppable; he could take the throne if he wanted. That would be hilarious. Oh, the looks on certain faces!

    But that would be cruel at best, he thought. At worst, the results might be something between melodrama and the bloodiest of tragedies. Anyway, to be king of the Sarl no longer seemed like the greatest thing a soul might aspire to, not by some long measure.

    He changed, became a she again. The lesson regarding being a considerate lover did not change.

    She took her Full Name. In her father’s kingdom, she had been called Djan Seriy Hausk’a yun Pourl, yun Dich — this translated as Djan, Prince-Consort Hausk’s daughter of Pourl, of the Eighth.
    Here, now that she thought of herself as a Culture citizen — albeit still one that had been born and brought up elsewhere — she took the name Meseriphine-Sursamen/VIIIsa Djan Seriy Anaplian dam Pourl.

    Marain, the Culture’s exquisitely formed meta-language, used its Secondary Numbering Series to denote Shellworld levels. The Anaplian part came from her mother’s name: Anaplia. The word Seriy — indicating she had been raised to be fit to be married to a prince — she kept for a laugh. She expressed disappointment that there was no ceremony to mark the taking of one’s Full Name. Her friends and colleagues invented one for her.

    She had further treatments, to give her control of many more aspects of her body and mind. Now she would age very slowly, and did not really need to age at all. Now she was proof against any natural disease under this or any other sun, and even losing something as major as a limb would prove only a temporary inconvenience, as a new one would simply grow back. Now she had the full panoply of drug glands, with all the benefits and responsibilities that entailed. Now she gained fully augmented senses — so that, for example, her vision became sharper and brought her information about the infrared and the ultraviolet — now she could sense radio waves, now she was able to interface directly with machines via a thing called a neural lace that had grown about and through her brain like a flimsy, three-dimensional net, now she could switch off pain and fatigue (though her body seemed to scorn them anyway), now her nerves changed to become more like wires, shifting impulses far faster than before, while her bones accreted strands of carbon to make them stronger and her muscles went through chemical and microscopically scaled mechanical changes that made them more effective and more powerful. Every major internal organ grew more efficient, more tolerant, more capable, resilient and adaptable, even as many of them grew smaller.

    She became part of Contact and joined the crew of the General Contact Unit Transient Atmospheric Phenomenon. She’d had the luxury of a choice in the matter and had turned down the Experiencing A Significant Gravitas Shortfall and the Pure Big Mad Boat Man just because of their ridiculous names. She served with distinction for only five years aboard the GCU before the invitation to join Special Circumstances arrived. A surprisingly short period of additional training ensued; almost all the new skills she would now need were already there, pre-implanted. She was reunited with the drone Turminder Xuss, who had always been intended as her companion. She discovered the old machine came complete with a small squadron of knife, attack and scout missiles and was effectively a little arsenal of wide-spectrum destruction all on its own.

    SC added its own final, finessed layers of additional characteristics to her already heady mix of bodily enhancements, empowering her still further: here were fingernails that could lase, to signal, blind or kill, here was a tiny reactor within her skull that, amongst other things, could provide the power to keep her alive and conscious for years without oxygen, here was a whole-body fibre structure welded to her very bones that could sense distortions in the skein of space itself; here was a level of conscious control over her own body and, almost incidentally, over any merely electronic machine within fifty metres which exceeded that of any rider over their mount or any champion swordsman over his blade…

    She felt, she realised one day, like a god.

    She thought then of Sursamen, and her old self, and knew there was no going back.

    * * *
    She was going back. And she was losing some of those skills and attributes, some of those martial enhancements
    Quote Originally Posted by Totally Not Larkonnis View Post
    at least we're not Greece.

  5. #2745
    dpidcoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pattern View Post
    For anyone who doubts Iain Banks, here is perhaps my favourite passage of pros out of all of Sci Fi, and perhaps literature. It's from the Culture Novel: Matter.
    At least I made it halfway through that before I couldn't take it anymore.

    edit: thinking about it for a bit, that passage just sits there taking a long time to tell a bunch of stuff about a character. There's no narration of the character doing anything, no dialogue, no actual things happening. I feel like banks would have done better to just create a wiki for the culture series and then start adding in entries for all the characters and events, rather than trying to cram it into story form.
    Last edited by dpidcoe; December 28 2013 at 06:09:11 AM.
    i heard you're ideas and their definately good

  6. #2746
    Malcanis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pratell View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by thebomby View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Thorjak View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by pratell View Post
    Just finished Consider Phlebas, was pretty bored throughout the entirety of it. Characters were dull, everything happened for boring reasons, and on top of that the author didn't write terribly well. After the first few times I got stuck on an awkward sentence that turned out to not be very interesting anyway I just moved on. Should I bother reading Banks's other books?
    yes

    Phlebas is the worst of the culture series by some way, but it sets up look to windward. The next one (Player of Games) is much better.
    There might be the occasional person, i.e. me, who disagrees with this. Consider Phlebas I found excellent.

    Busy re-reading The Book of the New Sun by Gene Wolfe. A true classic, by any measure.
    Consider Phlebas said nothing. The main theme of the book is nihilism and the idea that shit just doesn't matter...
    And this point runs like a thread through the entire Culture series.

  7. #2747
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    Quote Originally Posted by dpidcoe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Pattern View Post
    For anyone who doubts Iain Banks, here is perhaps my favourite passage of pros out of all of Sci Fi, and perhaps literature. It's from the Culture Novel: Matter.
    At least I made it halfway through that before I couldn't take it anymore.

    edit: thinking about it for a bit, that passage just sits there taking a long time to tell a bunch of stuff about a character. There's no narration of the character doing anything, no dialogue, no actual things happening. I feel like banks would have done better to just create a wiki for the culture series and then start adding in entries for all the characters and events, rather than trying to cram it into story form.
    I think it's unsurprising that Banks' works do, in fact have such a place.
    Будь смиренным, будь кротким, не заботься о тленном
    Власти, данной Богом, сынок, будь навеки верным...
    Я люблю Росcию, я - патриот

  8. #2748
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    Has anyone read Snuff (latest Pratchett novel) yet? Gonna get it anyway, just curious what people think.
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  9. #2749
    thebomby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malcanis View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by pratell View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by thebomby View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Thorjak View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by pratell View Post
    Just finished Consider Phlebas, was pretty bored throughout the entirety of it. Characters were dull, everything happened for boring reasons, and on top of that the author didn't write terribly well. After the first few times I got stuck on an awkward sentence that turned out to not be very interesting anyway I just moved on. Should I bother reading Banks's other books?
    yes

    Phlebas is the worst of the culture series by some way, but it sets up look to windward. The next one (Player of Games) is much better.
    There might be the occasional person, i.e. me, who disagrees with this. Consider Phlebas I found excellent.

    Busy re-reading The Book of the New Sun by Gene Wolfe. A true classic, by any measure.
    Consider Phlebas said nothing. The main theme of the book is nihilism and the idea that shit just doesn't matter...
    And this point runs like a thread through the entire Culture series.
    I would argue that Consider Phlebas, along with Use of Weapons and Look to Windward, is a tragedy, in the classical sense, although that would be just one theme of many in the novel. One thing that has occurred to me many times over the past two decades, watching the way people and cultures react to fiction, be it in novels or movies, is that there is a large group of people who view tragedies, so called bad endings, as taboo, and have an almost visceral dislike for them. Why that is, I don't know, but I suspect it's because of the fear of failure, futility and death, along with the resultant painful emotions and thoughts.
    Будь смиренным, будь кротким, не заботься о тленном
    Власти, данной Богом, сынок, будь навеки верным...
    Я люблю Росcию, я - патриот

  10. #2750

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    Bad endings are fine, but endings where something unrelated to the characters and story just pops up out of nowhere are not (Excession and Matter are the worst offenders from Banks and Hydrogen Sonata and Player of games are the only ones I can remember that don't suffer from this).

  11. #2751
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    Quote Originally Posted by depili View Post
    Bad endings are fine, but endings where something unrelated to the characters and story just pops up out of nowhere are not (Excession and Matter are the worst offenders from Banks and Hydrogen Sonata and Player of games are the only ones I can remember that don't suffer from this).
    Pink Eyes does this nicely, you know from the start that "oh yeah, this is going to suck", it all even gets spelled out during one of the subplots, yet the protagonist is to naive to catch on
    Suppose it turns out alright, but not exactly according to the traditonal rules of good ending

  12. #2752
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    Excession is a book entirely about deus ex stuff.... did you miss this point? What happens to the weak gods when a stronger one shows up?

  13. #2753
    Super Baderator DonorGlobal Moderator cullnean's Avatar
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    Some people don't like my favourite author, how will i ever cope.

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  14. #2754
    Donor Pattern's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by balistic void View Post
    Excession is a book entirely about deus ex stuff.... did you miss this point? What happens to the weak gods when a stronger one shows up?
    Both Matter and Excession are completely about the deus ex random oh shit events that make everything else meaningless,
    Quote Originally Posted by dpidcoe View Post
    edit: thinking about it for a bit, that passage just sits there taking a long time to tell a bunch of stuff about a character. There's no narration of the character doing anything, no dialogue, no actual things happening. I feel like banks would have done better to just create a wiki for the culture series and then start adding in entries for all the characters and events, rather than trying to cram it into story form.
    The entire rest of the freaking book is about the character doing stuff and things happening, the beauty of that passage, I found, is just how well he did condense the entire culture into a few pages, in a way that makes a wiki redundant
    Quote Originally Posted by Totally Not Larkonnis View Post
    at least we're not Greece.

  15. #2755
    20% into The Winter King now - too early for a real impression, but so far so good. Feels a lot like HBOs take on the legend of Arthur - wouldn't be surprised if they actually decided to adapt it

  16. #2756
    Movember 2012 ElweSingollo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FatFreddy View Post
    Has anyone read Snuff (latest Pratchett novel) yet? Gonna get it anyway, just curious what people think.
    I did enjoy snuff it was very Vimes centric ofc and kinda follows on from the whole developement of his character in Thud so worth a read IMO. On the other hand I have just finished reading Raising Steam which is the latest one he released which I found quite difficult to get through tbh I think I maybe need to read it again but I just struggled with that one which hasn't happened before for me on a discworld novel.

  17. #2757
    Super Baderator DonorGlobal Moderator cullnean's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ElweSingollo View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by FatFreddy View Post
    Has anyone read Snuff (latest Pratchett novel) yet? Gonna get it anyway, just curious what people think.
    I did enjoy snuff it was very Vimes centric ofc and kinda follows on from the whole developement of his character in Thud so worth a read IMO. On the other hand I have just finished reading Raising Steam which is the latest one he released which I found quite difficult to get through tbh I think I maybe need to read it again but I just struggled with that one which hasn't happened before for me on a discworld novel.
    unfortunately the latest books, from unseen academicals onwards have seen a decline in line with his illness.
    Quote Originally Posted by Elriche Oshego View Post
    Cullneshi the god of shitposting.
    Quote Originally Posted by RazoR View Post
    anything soviet is of evil

  18. #2758
    dpidcoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pattern View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by dpidcoe View Post
    edit: thinking about it for a bit, that passage just sits there taking a long time to tell a bunch of stuff about a character. There's no narration of the character doing anything, no dialogue, no actual things happening. I feel like banks would have done better to just create a wiki for the culture series and then start adding in entries for all the characters and events, rather than trying to cram it into story form.
    The entire rest of the freaking book is about the character doing stuff and things happening, the beauty of that passage, I found, is just how well he did condense the entire culture into a few pages, in a way that makes a wiki redundant
    Or conversely, a wiki could make the book redundant while being a lot more pleasant to read than an infodump wedged into the middle of a story.

    Quote Originally Posted by cullnean View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by ElweSingollo View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by FatFreddy View Post
    Has anyone read Snuff (latest Pratchett novel) yet? Gonna get it anyway, just curious what people think.
    I did enjoy snuff it was very Vimes centric ofc and kinda follows on from the whole developement of his character in Thud so worth a read IMO. On the other hand I have just finished reading Raising Steam which is the latest one he released which I found quite difficult to get through tbh I think I maybe need to read it again but I just struggled with that one which hasn't happened before for me on a discworld novel.
    unfortunately the latest books, from unseen academicals onwards have seen a decline in line with his illness.
    Crap, I'm only up to witches abroad so far. I'm really not looking forward to when I run into the decline of the series
    Last edited by dpidcoe; December 28 2013 at 11:11:01 PM.
    i heard you're ideas and their definately good

  19. #2759
    Super Baderator DonorGlobal Moderator cullnean's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dpidcoe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Pattern View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by dpidcoe View Post
    edit: thinking about it for a bit, that passage just sits there taking a long time to tell a bunch of stuff about a character. There's no narration of the character doing anything, no dialogue, no actual things happening. I feel like banks would have done better to just create a wiki for the culture series and then start adding in entries for all the characters and events, rather than trying to cram it into story form.
    The entire rest of the freaking book is about the character doing stuff and things happening, the beauty of that passage, I found, is just how well he did condense the entire culture into a few pages, in a way that makes a wiki redundant
    Or conversely, a wiki could make the book redundant while being a lot more pleasant to read than an infodump wedged into the middle of a story.

    Quote Originally Posted by cullnean View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by ElweSingollo View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by FatFreddy View Post
    Has anyone read Snuff (latest Pratchett novel) yet? Gonna get it anyway, just curious what people think.
    I did enjoy snuff it was very Vimes centric ofc and kinda follows on from the whole developement of his character in Thud so worth a read IMO. On the other hand I have just finished reading Raising Steam which is the latest one he released which I found quite difficult to get through tbh I think I maybe need to read it again but I just struggled with that one which hasn't happened before for me on a discworld novel.
    unfortunately the latest books, from unseen academicals onwards have seen a decline in line with his illness.
    Crap, I'm only up to witches abroad so far. I'm really not looking forward to when I run into the decline of the series

    you have plenty to go before that stage, also gg misinterpreting my other post you neg rep mary
    Quote Originally Posted by Elriche Oshego View Post
    Cullneshi the god of shitposting.
    Quote Originally Posted by RazoR View Post
    anything soviet is of evil

  20. #2760
    Malcanis's Avatar
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    Even the later ones have a lot of good stuff in them. People forget that his stuff always had a certain variability in quality.

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