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Thread: Based individuals

  1. #1

    Based individuals

    Every now and again through my internet browsing I come across tales of rather inspiring, but forgotten individuals. Please post examples. I'll start with a chap who was dramatised in 'A Bridge Too Far' but was actually real and survived...

    Digby Tatham-Warter



    Digby graduated from Sandhurst as an officer with the rank of second lieutenant on 21 January 1937 and was commissioned into the Unattached List for the Indian Army with a view to joining the Indian Army due to his family connections. He was attached to the 2nd Battalion, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry in India from 13 March 1937, and subsequently transferred to that regiment 27 April 1938 (so never joining the Indian Army) so that he would be able to continue his hobbies of tiger hunting and pig sticking.[2][4][5]
    When the Second World War broke out, Digby was not initially sent to fight in Europe. His sister Kit served in the Western Desert Campaign and was awarded the French Croix de guerre while serving with the Hadfield-Spears Unit. Upon hearing of his brother John's death at the Second Battle of El Alamein in late 1942 with the 2nd Dragoon Guards, The Queen's Bays, Digby volunteered for the airborne forces and transferred to the Parachute Regiment. He was appointed as the company commander of A Company of the 2nd Parachute Battalion, part of the 1st Parachute Brigade of the 1st Airborne Division. He was stationed in Grantham, Lincolnshire during training. His tiger hunting exploits were well known, and his reputation was enhanced as he was able to obtain the use of an American Dakota aeroplane in which he flew all the company officers in the camp to London for a party at The Ritz London Hotel.[2]

    A Company was then chosen by the battalion's commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel John Dutton Frost, to lead the 2nd Parachute Battalion in the Battle of Arnhem, part of Operation Market Garden, because of Digby's reputation of being an aggressive commander. In preparation Digby, concerned about the unreliability of radios, educated his men on how to use bugle calls that had been used during the Napoleonic Wars for communication in case the radios failed. He also took an umbrella with his kit as a means of identification because he had trouble remembering passwords and felt that anyone who saw him with it would think that "only a bloody fool of an Englishman" would carry an umbrella into battle.[6]

    A Company were dropped away from the target of Arnhem Bridge and had to go through Arnhem where the streets were blocked by German forces. Digby led his men through the back gardens of nearby houses instead of attempting to advance through the streets and thus avoided the Germans.[1] Digby and A Company managed to travel 8 miles in 7 hours while also taking prisoner 150 German soldiers including members of the SS. During the battle, Digby wore his red beret instead of a helmet and waved his umbrella while walking about the defences despite heavy mortar fire. When the Germans started using tanks to cross the bridge, Digby led a bayonet charge against them wearing a bowler hat. He later disabled a German armoured car with his umbrella, incapacitating the driver by shoving the umbrella through the car's observational slit and poking the driver in the eye.[1]

    Digby then noticed the chaplain pinned down by enemy fire while trying to cross the street to get to injured soldiers. Digby got to him and said "Don't worry about the bullets, I've got an umbrella". He then escorted the chaplain across the street under his umbrella. When he returned to the front line, one of his fellow officers said about his umbrella that "that thing won't do you any good", to which Digby replied "Oh my goodness Pat, but what if it rains?"[7] Digby was later injured by shrapnel, which also cut open the rear of his trousers but continued to fight until A Company had run out of ammunition. Despite the radios being unreliable as Digby had predicted and the bugle calls being used most in the battle, the message "out of ammo, God save The King" was radioed out before Digby was captured.[8]

    Because of his injury, Digby was sent to St Elizabeth's Hospital but escaped out of a window with his second in command Captain Tony Frank, when the German nurses had left them alone. After creating an escape compass from buttons on his uniform, Digby and Frank headed towards Mariendaal. Upon arriving, they were hidden by a Dutch woman who spoke no English before being put in contact with her neighbour. He disguised them as painters and moved them to Derk Wildeboer's house. Wildeboer was a local leader of the Dutch Resistance in Ede. They then met Menno de Nooy of the Dutch Resistance who gave them a bicycle. Wildeboer had a fake Dutch identity card made for Digby to allow him to pose as Peter Jensen, a deaf-mute son of a lawyer.[1] Digby used the bicycle to visit fellow soldiers in hiding and the Germans did not recognise him despite him helping to push a Nazi staff car out of a ditch and German soldiers being billeted in the same house that he was staying in.[1] Digby then gathered 150 escaped soldiers to head towards the front line. This was known as Operation Pegasus. Digby and the soldiers cycled to the Rhine and Digby flashed a V for Victory sign using Morse Code with his torch. Members of XXX Corps then ferried them across the river. Upon return to the United Kingdom, Digby was awarded the Distinguished Service Order.[7]


  2. #2
    Crystalline Entity's Avatar
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    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Birger_Eriksen



    He commanded a small norwegian island with raw recruits and old people and scored a decent blow against the attacking germans

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle...C3%B8bak_Sound

    In one of the more peculiar battles of the war, a hundred year old fortification, manned by raw recruits and pensioners and armed with 40- to 50-year-old weaponry of German and Austro-Hungarian manufacture, had destroyed a ship so new, its crew was still finishing training. Oscarsborg had fulfilled its mission and denied an invader access to the capital. Even though it and the country were ultimately captured and occupied, the effects of delaying the German advance were immediate and considerable. On board Blücher were troops specially designated to capture the King, the Norwegian cabinet, the Storting (Norwegian Parliament) and the national gold reserve; the delay made it possible for all these to escape
    "I think we could all do with sitting back a bit and detaching ourselves from the situation to really think about how these issues reflect on our future and how we discuss them here and be a bit less aggressive or defensive because everyone has a complicated set of circumstances that has led the to place importance on particular issues and it doesn't meany any of them is less valid, we just need to look at the broader picture"

    Smuggo - Brexit Thread

  3. #3
    Did a quick google for Digby's sister...

    This was all I could find

    THE Hadfield-Spears Unit had arrived at Plymouth on the "Etric" from St.-Jean-de-Luz the twenty-seventh of June, 1940. Re-formed and reequipped it embarked at Glasgow on the "Otranto" on March 24th, '41, for a destination unknown. Seven of the original team volunteered to go with me once again overseas. Barbara Graham, Kit Tatham-Warter, Cynthia Toulmin and Rosie Forbes of the M.T.C. and three nurses, Evelyn Fuhlroth, Nancy Wright and Josie Pearce. To these were added four M.T.C. drivers and five nurses, bringing each group up to eight in the new unit.
    She died in 1999.


  4. #4
    Donor Spaztick's Avatar
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    My personal hero piper Bill Millan:



    Millin is best remembered for playing the pipes whilst under fire during the D-Day landing in Normandy... He played "Highland Laddie," "The Road to the Isles," and "All the blue bonnets are over the border," as his comrades fell around him on Sword. Millin states that he later talked to captured German snipers who claimed they did not shoot at him because they thought he had gone mad.

    Millin ... was the only man during the landing who wore a kilt – it was the same Cameron tartan kilt his father had worn in Flanders during World War I – and he was armed only with his pipes and the sgian-dubh, or "black knife", sheathed inside his kilt-hose on the right side. In keeping with Scottish tradition, he wore no underwear beneath the kilt. He later told author Peter Caddick-Adams that the coldness of the water took his breath away.
    There is a statue commemorating the landing at Normandy for all the pipers that played during the war. The ceremony had a ton of individual pipers and pipe bands show up to volunteer to play sprung the ceremony (yours truly being among them).



    Last edited by Spaztick; February 3 2019 at 11:45:51 PM.

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    Vlad Dracula as one of the most capable military commanders in history. Dude literally got a bunch of troops through a honourable 1 v 1 @ sun






    Since he was a hostage in the Ottoman Empire he learned to speak Turkish fluently. He would walk among his enemies' camps at night. He actually fought himself and was often in the think of battle. His downfall really was the betrayal by the Hungarians and the unfortunate awoxing done by his brother Radu.
    Last edited by Seraph IX Basarab; February 4 2019 at 01:10:28 AM.
    "Last night I saw upon the stair
    A little man who wasn’t there
    He wasn’t there again today
    Oh, how I wish he’d go away"

  6. #6
    Movember 2012 Elriche Oshego's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seraph IX Basarab View Post
    Vlad the Implier
    Every now and again through my internet browsing I come across tales of rather inspiring, but forgotten individuals. Please post examples.

  7. #7
    Paradox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elriche Oshego View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Seraph IX Basarab View Post
    Vlad the Implier
    Every now and again through my internet browsing I come across tales of rather inspiring, but forgotten individuals. Please post examples.
    Have you heard of our lord and saviour "Genghis Khan"???? Few have but what I'm about to tell you is a doozy:::>......


    Poland treats me like shit and I hate them as a result of it

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    Stefan cel Mare. I'd be surprised if you can find another commander that employed such a complex plan successfully. The wife of the Sultan remarked that Vaslui was the greatest military campaign defeat that the Turks ever received. So much so that the pope gave him the title of "Champion of Christ" despite not even being a papist himself.

    He also had a successful record fighting Poland where he defeated their army by burning a forest down around them. He defeated the Mongols and impaled a bunch of them for raiding the eastern lands of Romania for slaves.

    Agincourt who? Hastings What? Crecy huh?


    Last edited by Seraph IX Basarab; February 4 2019 at 01:07:53 AM.
    "Last night I saw upon the stair
    A little man who wasn’t there
    He wasn’t there again today
    Oh, how I wish he’d go away"

  9. #9
    Movember 2012 Elriche Oshego's Avatar
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    Paging Hoggbutt



    Lieutenant Colonel John Macdonell:

    He also became a lieutenant colonel in the York Militia[1] and, at the outbreak of the War of 1812, became secretary and provincial aide-de-camp to General Isaac Brock. On 13 October 1812, during the Battle of Queenston Heights, Brock was struck and killed by an American musket ball. Despite being a lawyer by trade with little military experience, Lieutenant-Colonel Macdonell, along with Captain John Williams of the 49th Foot,[2] led a second attempt to retake the Redan, one that was very nearly successful.

    With Williams' men of the 49th starting from brush to the right of the line near the escarpment and Macdonell's anchoring the left, the force of between 70 and 80 men (more than half of whom were militia) advanced toward the Redan Battery. The U.S. forces under the command of Captain John E. Wool had been reinforced by more troops who had just made their way up the path to the top of the Heights, and Macdonell faced some four hundred troops.

    Despite the disadvantage in numbers as well as attacking a fixed position, Williams' and Macdonell's small force was driving the opposing force to the edge of the gorge on which the Redan was situated, and seemed on the verge of success before the Americans were able to regroup and stand firm. The momentum of the battle turned when a musket ball hit Macdonell's mount, causing it to rear and twist around. Another shot hit Macdonnell in the small of the back, causing him to fall from the horse.[3] He was removed from the battlefield but succumbed to his injuries early the next day.

    On 16 October 1812 Lieut. Col. Macdonell, along with General Brock, was buried in the bastion at the northeast corner of Fort George. In 1824, both bodies were moved to Queenston Heights to be interred in the first Brock's Monument. It is documented that when moving the remains someone noted that while Lieut. Col. Macdonell was in a later state of decomposition, General Brock's remains were near perfect. In 1840, Irish-Canadian Benjamin Lett was suspected of (but never charged with) setting an explosive charge that heavily damaged the first monument. When a new monument was built, there was no mention of Macdonell on it. But inside the monument there is a brass plaque which reads:

    Beneath are deposited the mortal remains of Lieut. Colonel John Macdonell P.A. D.C. and Aide-de-camp to the lamented Major General Sir Isaac Brock. K.B. Who fell mortally wounded at the Battle of Queenston on 13 October 1812 and died on the following day. His remains were removed and reinterred with due solemnity, on 13 October 1853.
    Last edited by Elriche Oshego; February 4 2019 at 12:47:58 AM.

  10. #10
    Donor Spaztick's Avatar
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    Eh, can we keep this particular thread to high-quality shitposting at least? Just a youtube video doesn't really say much. At least throw in a few pictures and a small description to give people incentive to look at what you're posting.

  11. #11
    Venec's Avatar
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    >click the thread expecting it to be full of military men and glorification of war
    >went exactly as I thought

    TBH, I'm not even blaming. A lot of historians have this weird, unhealthy fetish of war, battles, murder count and it's harder to read about people doing good things.

    Like the dude who singe-handedly mined through a hill to shorten the way from his village to nearest hospital after his wife died in accident:

    Dashrath Manjhi was born in a dalit family. He ran away from his home at a young age and worked at Dhanbad's coal mines. He returned to his village and married Falguni Devi.

    Falguni Devi died after an accident due to not receiving immediate medical care, as there were no nearby hospitals. Thinking that no one else should suffer this fate, he resolved to build the road to make his village more accessible. Manjhi felt the need to do something for society and decided to carve a path through the Gehlour hills so that his village could have easier access to medical attention. He carved a path 110 m long, 7.7 m deep in places and 9.1 m wide to form a road through the rocks in Gehlour hill. He said, "When I started hammering the hill, people called me a lunatic but that steeled my resolve."

    He completed the work in 22 years (1960–1982). This path reduced the distance between the Atri and Wazirganj sectors of the Gaya district from 30 km to 3 km. Though mocked for his efforts, Manjhi's work has made life easier for people of the Gehlaur village. Later, Manjhi said, "Though most villagers taunted me at first, there were quite a few who lent me support later by giving me food and helping me buy my tools."
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dashrath_Manjhi
    Last edited by Venec; February 4 2019 at 07:31:45 AM.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Venec View Post
    >click the thread expecting it to be full of military men and glorification of war
    >went exactly as I thought

    TBH, I'm not even blaming. A lot of historians have this weird, unhealthy fetish of war, battles, murder count and it's harder to read about people doing good things.


    I don't disagree, but why not post some which fit your view more then at least? Shape your world.

    Here would be a good source, for example.
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    M8, i have discussions that spam multiple accounts, you aren't even on my level

  13. #13
    Venec's Avatar
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    I edited my post above. Cheers.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Venec View Post
    >click the thread expecting it to be full of military men and glorification of war
    >went exactly as I thought

    TBH, I'm not even blaming. A lot of historians have this weird, unhealthy fetish of war, battles, murder count and it's harder to read about people doing good things.

    Like the dude who singe-handedly mined through a hill to shorten the way from his village to nearest hospital after his wife died in accident:

    Dashrath Manjhi was born in a dalit family. He ran away from his home at a young age and worked at Dhanbad's coal mines. He returned to his village and married Falguni Devi.

    Falguni Devi died after an accident due to not receiving immediate medical care, as there were no nearby hospitals. Thinking that no one else should suffer this fate, he resolved to build the road to make his village more accessible. Manjhi felt the need to do something for society and decided to carve a path through the Gehlour hills so that his village could have easier access to medical attention. He carved a path 110 m long, 7.7 m deep in places and 9.1 m wide to form a road through the rocks in Gehlour hill. He said, "When I started hammering the hill, people called me a lunatic but that steeled my resolve."

    He completed the work in 22 years (1960–1982). This path reduced the distance between the Atri and Wazirganj sectors of the Gaya district from 30 km to 3 km. Though mocked for his efforts, Manjhi's work has made life easier for people of the Gehlaur village. Later, Manjhi said, "Though most villagers taunted me at first, there were quite a few who lent me support later by giving me food and helping me buy my tools."
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dashrath_Manjhi
    Maybe because these things are meaningful and great?
    "Last night I saw upon the stair
    A little man who wasn’t there
    He wasn’t there again today
    Oh, how I wish he’d go away"

  15. #15
    Donor Sparq's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Totally Not Larkonnis View Post
    Did a quick google for Digby's sister...

    This was all I could find

    THE Hadfield-Spears Unit had arrived at Plymouth on the "Etric" from St.-Jean-de-Luz the twenty-seventh of June, 1940. Re-formed and reequipped it embarked at Glasgow on the "Otranto" on March 24th, '41, for a destination unknown. Seven of the original team volunteered to go with me once again overseas. Barbara Graham, Kit Tatham-Warter, Cynthia Toulmin and Rosie Forbes of the M.T.C. and three nurses, Evelyn Fuhlroth, Nancy Wright and Josie Pearce. To these were added four M.T.C. drivers and five nurses, bringing each group up to eight in the new unit.
    She died in 1999.
    Yeah, she was an ambulance driver. I dug a little deeper, all I could find was some family history page that mentions prior to the war (1930s) she bred Rhodesian Ridgebacks, as one of the first breeders in England. After the war she was an accomplished horse rider, competing in various events and claiming various awards and medals.

  16. #16
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    I think my mom was pretty based. Never knew her mother. Her alcoholic father sent her to live with an aunt in the desert who treated her like utter shit. She had an 11kg cyst removed when she was 16, developed cerebral palsy, and her husband died in a car accident, leaving her with two small kids. She worked two jobs until both of us had left home, and carried on working as a music teacher until she was 80.
    Будь смиренным, будь кротким, не заботься о тленном
    Власти, данной Богом, сынок, будь навеки верным...
    Я люблю Росcию, я - патриот

  17. #17
    Movember 2012 Elriche Oshego's Avatar
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    Extremely based Mum. Would rep again.

  18. #18
    thebomby's Avatar
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    +mum
    Будь смиренным, будь кротким, не заботься о тленном
    Власти, данной Богом, сынок, будь навеки верным...
    Я люблю Росcию, я - патриот

  19. #19
    Lief Siddhe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elriche Oshego View Post
    Extremely based Mum. Would rep again.
    I was somewhere around Old Man Star, on the edge of Essence, when drugs began to take hold.

  20. #20
    Movember 2012 Stoffl's Avatar
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    Shout out to bombys mum

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