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Thread: (UK EURO THREAD) UK POLITICS MK2

  1. #19101
    Sp4m's Avatar
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    it is doing what it was supposed to do.
    https://www.theguardian.com/business...g-up-low-wages

  2. #19102

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    (UK EURO THREAD) UK POLITICS MK2

    People who aren't dumb fucks would realise that "train more U.K. personnel" is only a sensible suggestion when the problem isn't acute, doesn't have a long training period and the the government's qualification body isn't massively backlogged.

  3. #19103
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    So Tesco are offering £1000 bonus to HGV licenced new drivers signing on to them. It costs £1500 to get a HGV licence.

  4. #19104

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    Quote Originally Posted by Duckslayer View Post
    So Tesco are offering £1000 bonus to HGV licenced new drivers signing on to them. It costs £1500 to get a HGV licence.
    "Every little helps"

  5. #19105

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  6. #19106
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    But you get a license for life or whatever. Not bad. Might consider it. Take jobs driving to poland and back. Stop in and see daughter every time.

  7. #19107
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    The point being if you want new unemployed people to move into areas where the UK is under staffed, having a £1500 barrier of entry rather than say, making the employer train you as part of the job would be a bit of an issue.

  8. #19108
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    You can join the army if you want it free but shit Pay and 3 year contract so theres options either way. Looking a gift horse in the mouth somewhat

  9. #19109
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    ‘It’s not a normal life’: truck drivers warn of burnout as global shortage bites
    Surging demand for goods during the pandemic has increased volumes for hauliers to carry
    https://www.ft.com/content/4e79e4ad-...2-9ab21748f81c

    Aliaksandr Matsiash, a Belarusian exile, joined Lithuanian trucking group Baltic Transline in May. But after two weeks of training, followed by 13 weeks living in a truck based in the Netherlands — all for a mere €2,470 — the 30-year-old quit. “It’s not a normal life for a human,” he said. “It’s like a prison, it’s not a job. You do it like a zombie.” Analysts say a global shortage of truck drivers has persisted since the middle of the 2000s. But Matsiash’s case illustrates the human dimension of a deteriorating global driver shortage that has tipped into a crisis only recently visible to the wider public.

    In the UK, supermarket shelves are missing goods, McDonald’s restaurants ran out of milkshakes this week and builders cannot access supplies, while iron ore struggles to reach Australian ports for export. The potential consequences are serious. André LeBlanc, vice-president of operations at Petroleum Marketing Group, a fuel distributor based in Virginia, US, said petrol stations that it supplied had run out of some products about 1,200 times since mid-June because of driver shortages. “You don’t get your toilet tissues and your eggs, that’s one thing. Gasoline stops — it shuts everything down,” he said.

    The transport sector’s labour issues have built up over time as multinational companies have driven down supply chain costs. At the same time, the trucking workforce in developed nations has aged — the average truck driver in the UK is 55 — while more jobs have become computer-based. Bob Costello, chief economist at American Trucking Associations, said the number of drivers in general freight in the US had dropped to 430,000, down from 465,000 people at the start of 2020. “The driver shortage in the US is getting even worse; it is as bad as it has ever been,” he added. Keith Newton, secretary-general of the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport International, said members in Australia and central Asia had reported heavy goods vehicle driver shortages of 20 per cent. Surging demand for goods during the pandemic has increased volumes for hauliers to carry, while accelerated growth in the ecommerce sector has only exacerbated pressures. “Increasingly, global trade is becoming more complex, consumers want quicker deliveries, and simply there are not enough skilled HGV drivers to handle this demand around the world,” Newton said.

    Girteka, one of Europe’s largest hauliers, which plans to hire 7,000 new drivers in total this year, said more employees were needed per truck to allow workers to spend more time at home. Baltic Transline disputes Matsiash’s portrayal of his work and living conditions,*and said*he was aware he may be required to spend extended periods of time in the truck. It*maintains that*it “strictly adheres to the legislation in force and provides suitable lodging as well as ensures appropriate work conditions to all of its employees”.

    The UK, which has an estimated 100,000-driver shortage, has been hit particularly hard not only by the departure of drivers from EU countries because of Brexit and the pandemic, but also by reform to tax legislation introduced this year that drastically reduced incomes for agency workers. Pandemic-driven backlogs at testing centres have hindered the flow of new drivers, with the UK logistics sector pushing for a stop-gap solution of drivers from EU countries being given temporary visas. Still, there are practical difficulties. “Even if we were allowed to recruit drivers from the EU, there’s a shortage of drivers there as well,” said Rod McKenzie, head of policy at the Road Haulage Association. “The only place that doesn’t have a significant shortage of drivers is Africa.”

    US trucking companies are also looking overseas for solutions, despite strict quotas on visas. Anda Malescu, managing partner at Miami-based Malescu Law, is helping trucking companies to source drivers from Mexico, Canada and South Africa. “Companies are increasingly desperate,” she said. Large companies are turning on the charm offensive to hire new recruits. Walmart is offering an $8,000 signing bonus for some drivers, while British retailer John Lewis announced plans to raise driver salaries by up to £5,000 a year. UK wages for a category of LGV drivers have increased 21 per cent to £36,800 in just under a year, according to recruiter Adzuna.

    But trade groups say the bonuses and better pay only encourage drivers to move from one employer to another without attracting new blood to the profession, while doing nothing to resolve the problems of drivers who are not paid for time spent waiting around. “It’s more than pay that drivers want,” said Patrick Doran, who after seven years of trucking in the UK wants to drive buses instead. For truckers, the lack of proper facilities, from toilets and parking to designated rest bays, is also a common complaint. Many report a vicious cycle of labour shortages resulting in more pressure on them to fulfil more deliveries, concluding it is no longer worth the strain and the long periods away from home. “I used to love the job,” said Jose Queiros, a Portuguese national who came to Britain in 1990 but left the trucking industry in April after 12 years. He now works in a quarry. “As time went on the job became harder and harder as companies would just push and push.”

    The growing pressures have led observers to caution against quick fixes that paper over structural issues that have made the sector so unattractive. Any solutions to the crisis may result in higher prices for consumers. Herman Bolhaar, the national rapporteur on human trafficking in the Netherlands, said the Dutch government and others have not done enough to enforce regulations, let alone shine a light on the reality of truckers’ labour conditions. He said that his country lacked sufficient information on labour exploitation related to trucking and that “we should know far more precisely what these numbers are”. “It’s not a local issue, it’s not a national issue, it’s an international issue,” he said. “It has to do with economics, trade, cost, profit and prices but more fundamentally it’s about human rights, human dignity and fair working conditions.”

  10. #19110

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    Worker shortage is a vicious cycle that burns up the remaining workers quite easily if management just piles more work on them. At least in our parts of the woods it isn't as bad as in the UK.

  11. #19111
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    I mean what do you expect? Nobody looks at trucking as a viable career due to the upcoming automation.

  12. #19112
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sp4m View Post
    I mean what do you expect? Nobody looks at trucking as a viable career due to the upcoming automation.
    That's always been big time hype designed to scare workers and pump stock prices. It's funny because this hype has indeed backfired and people aren't picking up careers like trucking anymore. The tech companies and their lackeys in the press have been trying to hype the idea of self-driving cars and taxis for well over a decade (mostly to pump their stock prices). But the mass deployment is more complicated in reality, and trucks are even worse than cars if you're thinking about the way one of them has to drive through an urban area and "see" things like pesky pedestrians to get to some warehouse or distribution center

    If you look at how automation works in warehousing for instance, there's always this specialized and streamlined layout set aside for the robots and humans are not allowed anywhere near these areas to avoid mucking it up for the them. To actually make fully automated vehicles practical you would need to change the road infrastructure quite a bit to accommodate robits

  13. #19113
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    Those articles generated a lot of clicks and associated ad revenue though, so at the end of the day it was probably worth it!
    Look, the wages you withheld from the workmen who mowed your fields are crying out against you. The cries of the harvesters have reached the ears of the Lord of Hosts. You have lived on earth in luxury and self-indulgence. You have fattened yourselves for slaughter.

  14. #19114

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    Long haul truckking across the country has way better prospects of getting automated than the last bit of deliveries in cities, there you will need someone to do the unloading anyway... Unless the climate catastrophe fucks us up beyond all recognition I believe we will see automated long-haul trucks, but even that will take some time and they might not come to all corners of the world, as snowy roads for example are Really Really Really hard for computer vision.

  15. #19115

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sp4m
    But you get a license for life or whatever. Not bad. Might consider it. Take jobs driving to poland and back. Stop in and see daughter every time.
    Quote Originally Posted by Sp4m View Post
    I mean what do you expect? Nobody looks at trucking as a viable career due to the upcoming automation.

  16. #19116
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rodj Blake View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Sp4m
    But you get a license for life or whatever. Not bad. Might consider it. Take jobs driving to poland and back. Stop in and see daughter every time.
    Quote Originally Posted by Sp4m View Post
    I mean what do you expect? Nobody looks at trucking as a viable career due to the upcoming automation.
    Has Spam ever had a cogent argument? The brexiteer in all its unsound glory

  17. #19117
    Movember 2011 RazoR's Avatar
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    hey guys we should automate long-haul trucking
    wait, what are railroads?

  18. #19118
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    Quote Originally Posted by RazoR View Post
    hey guys we should automate long-haul trucking
    wait, what are railroads?
    expensive and COMMUNIST.
    Viking, n.:
    1. Daring Scandinavian seafarers, explorers, adventurers, entrepreneurs world-famous for their aggressive, nautical import business, highly leveraged takeovers and blue eyes.
    2. Bloodthirsty sea pirates who ravaged northern Europe beginning in the 9th century.

    Hagar's note: The first definition is much preferred; the second is used only by malcontents, the envious, and disgruntled owners of waterfront property.

  19. #19119
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    Us rail moves far more than trucking here.

  20. #19120

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    Wetherspoons hit by a shortage of beer



    https://metro.co.uk/2021/08/31/beer-...ains-15184924/


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