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Thread: (UK EURO THREAD) UK POLITICS MK2

  1. #15941
    Joe Appleby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paradox View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Shaikar View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Appleby View Post
    You guys have a 48h week? Here it's 40, 42* at the most. Quite a few unions got 38.5 and 35h weeks in their contracts (which extend to all employees regardless of union membership).

    * government workers have that
    God no, not as standard.
    I'm sure there's a host of shit jobs where it's expected (or you want/need to, to scrape cash together etc) but mostly 35-40ish is the usual.
    My record is 72 hours in a week
    I probably hit that as well during crunch times like exams where the written exams need to be graded before the oral exams while regular lessons for other classes are ongoing. But that's offset by school breaks obviously.

    Tapapapatalk
    nevar forget

  2. #15942
    Malcanis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeromeDoutrande View Post
    UK workers’ rights at risk in plans to rip up EU labour market rules
    Post-Brexit shake-up of regulations including 48-hour week likely to spark trade union outrage
    https://www.ft.com/content/55588f86-...b-38723b787569

      Spoiler:
    The package of deregulatory measures is being put together by the UK’s business department (Beis) with the approval of Downing Street, according to people familiar with the matter. It has not yet been agreed by ministers — or put to the cabinet — but select business leaders have been sounded out on the plan. The proposed shake-up of regulations from the “working time directive” will delight many Tory MPs but is likely to spark outrage among Britain’s trade union leaders. The move would potentially mark a clear divergence from EU labour market standards but the UK would only face retaliation from Brussels under the terms of its new post-Brexit trade treaty if the EU could demonstrate the changes had a material impact on competition.

    The main areas of focus are on ending the 48-hour working week, tweaking the rules around rest breaks at work and not including overtime pay when calculating some holiday pay entitlements, according to people familiar with the plans. The government also wants to remove the requirement of businesses to log the detailed, daily reporting of working hours, saving an estimated £1bn. The government insisted that any reforms would be designed to help both companies and their employees — and put to a full consultation — saying it had no intention of “lowering” workers’ rights.*“The UK has one of the best workers’ rights records in the world,” a government spokesperson said. “Leaving the EU allows us to continue to be a standard setter and protect and enhance UK workers’ rights.”

    But Ed Miliband, Labour’s business secretary, said the proposals were a “disgrace” at a time when so many people were worried about their jobs. “In the midst of the worst economic crisis in three centuries, ministers are preparing to tear up their promises to the British people and taking a sledgehammer to workers’ rights,” he said.*“Workers in the UK are the primary beneficiaries of the very positive judgments of the European courts,” said an official at the Trades Union Congress, adding that any attempt to “whittle down and narrow” the interpretation of European law “is a concern because it amounts to a diminution of rights”.

    EU officials have said that decisions on whether to trigger tariffs and other “rebalancing measures” against the UK under the recently-signed post-Brexit trade deal would depend on the practical effects of policy decisions. Brussels has often highlighted labour market standards as a core issue for the “level playing field” that the deal is meant to uphold, but regulation of working time at EU level is patchy, with Brussels seeking repeatedly to shore up how the directive is applied. Britain, along with many EU countries, opted out from enforcing the 48-hour limit on the working week as a member state. The government points out that the UK often “gold plates” EU minimum standards — such as offering 5.6 weeks of annual leave compared with the EU requirement of 4 weeks. But in a call with 250 leading business figures earlier this month, prime minister Boris Johnson urged industry to get behind plans for future regulatory liberalisation after Brexit — to the delight of many free marketeers in his cabinet.

    Matt Kilcoyne, deputy head of the free market Adam Smith Institute, welcomed the proposals — saying the current “one size fits all” 48-hour rule was a “straitjacket on the economy”. Yet there will be nerves at the top of government about how a shake-up of employment rights will be received among low-paid working class voters who backed the Tories in northern “Red Wall” seats in the December 2019 general election.

    A change in the calculation of holiday pay could be “a significant monetary loss” for a low paid worker often forced into overtime to make ends meet, the TUC official said. It is also not clear that business, which is already adjusting to Brexit and battling the fallout from the Covid-19 pandemic, is currently clamouring for a fundamental overhaul of workers’ rights. Mark Fox, chief executive of the Business Services Association, said his members wanted reforms that “enhance stability” rather than cause disruption. “We are also mindful of the prime minister’s call to ‘level up’ and that must always mean improving the environment in which people work.” Adam Marshall, director-general of the British Chambers of Commerce, said the immediate priority for business after Brexit was to focus on developing a stable trading relationship with the EU. Any deregulatory dividend was likely to come in emerging sectors such as fintech or health tech, he added. Colin Leckey, partner in employment law at Lewis Silkin, said employers would welcome the UK rejecting new European case law requiring the detailed, daily reporting of working hours.

    However, any move to overturn recent European case law on holiday pay — which stipulates that sales commissions and overtime must be taken into account in its calculation — would be more contentious. Michael Ford, a barrister and professor at Bristol university, said much of the complexity employers faced in calculating holiday pay was the result of domestic legislation, rather than the judgments of the ECJ, although UK employers also disliked the ECJ’s stance in principle. Unions have brought a series of cases on the underpayment of holiday entitlements and employers would love to see them overturned, Mr Leckey said.
    but meester assured me that they wouldn't!
    Quote Originally Posted by Isyel View Post
    And btw, you're such a fucking asshole it genuinely amazes me on a regular basis how you manage to function.

  3. #15943

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    Quote Originally Posted by Malcanis View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by GeromeDoutrande View Post
    UK workers’ rights at risk in plans to rip up EU labour market rules
    Post-Brexit shake-up of regulations including 48-hour week likely to spark trade union outrage
    https://www.ft.com/content/55588f86-...b-38723b787569

      Spoiler:
    The package of deregulatory measures is being put together by the UK’s business department (Beis) with the approval of Downing Street, according to people familiar with the matter. It has not yet been agreed by ministers — or put to the cabinet — but select business leaders have been sounded out on the plan. The proposed shake-up of regulations from the “working time directive” will delight many Tory MPs but is likely to spark outrage among Britain’s trade union leaders. The move would potentially mark a clear divergence from EU labour market standards but the UK would only face retaliation from Brussels under the terms of its new post-Brexit trade treaty if the EU could demonstrate the changes had a material impact on competition.

    The main areas of focus are on ending the 48-hour working week, tweaking the rules around rest breaks at work and not including overtime pay when calculating some holiday pay entitlements, according to people familiar with the plans. The government also wants to remove the requirement of businesses to log the detailed, daily reporting of working hours, saving an estimated £1bn. The government insisted that any reforms would be designed to help both companies and their employees — and put to a full consultation — saying it had no intention of “lowering” workers’ rights.*“The UK has one of the best workers’ rights records in the world,” a government spokesperson said. “Leaving the EU allows us to continue to be a standard setter and protect and enhance UK workers’ rights.”

    But Ed Miliband, Labour’s business secretary, said the proposals were a “disgrace” at a time when so many people were worried about their jobs. “In the midst of the worst economic crisis in three centuries, ministers are preparing to tear up their promises to the British people and taking a sledgehammer to workers’ rights,” he said.*“Workers in the UK are the primary beneficiaries of the very positive judgments of the European courts,” said an official at the Trades Union Congress, adding that any attempt to “whittle down and narrow” the interpretation of European law “is a concern because it amounts to a diminution of rights”.

    EU officials have said that decisions on whether to trigger tariffs and other “rebalancing measures” against the UK under the recently-signed post-Brexit trade deal would depend on the practical effects of policy decisions. Brussels has often highlighted labour market standards as a core issue for the “level playing field” that the deal is meant to uphold, but regulation of working time at EU level is patchy, with Brussels seeking repeatedly to shore up how the directive is applied. Britain, along with many EU countries, opted out from enforcing the 48-hour limit on the working week as a member state. The government points out that the UK often “gold plates” EU minimum standards — such as offering 5.6 weeks of annual leave compared with the EU requirement of 4 weeks. But in a call with 250 leading business figures earlier this month, prime minister Boris Johnson urged industry to get behind plans for future regulatory liberalisation after Brexit — to the delight of many free marketeers in his cabinet.

    Matt Kilcoyne, deputy head of the free market Adam Smith Institute, welcomed the proposals — saying the current “one size fits all” 48-hour rule was a “straitjacket on the economy”. Yet there will be nerves at the top of government about how a shake-up of employment rights will be received among low-paid working class voters who backed the Tories in northern “Red Wall” seats in the December 2019 general election.

    A change in the calculation of holiday pay could be “a significant monetary loss” for a low paid worker often forced into overtime to make ends meet, the TUC official said. It is also not clear that business, which is already adjusting to Brexit and battling the fallout from the Covid-19 pandemic, is currently clamouring for a fundamental overhaul of workers’ rights. Mark Fox, chief executive of the Business Services Association, said his members wanted reforms that “enhance stability” rather than cause disruption. “We are also mindful of the prime minister’s call to ‘level up’ and that must always mean improving the environment in which people work.” Adam Marshall, director-general of the British Chambers of Commerce, said the immediate priority for business after Brexit was to focus on developing a stable trading relationship with the EU. Any deregulatory dividend was likely to come in emerging sectors such as fintech or health tech, he added. Colin Leckey, partner in employment law at Lewis Silkin, said employers would welcome the UK rejecting new European case law requiring the detailed, daily reporting of working hours.

    However, any move to overturn recent European case law on holiday pay — which stipulates that sales commissions and overtime must be taken into account in its calculation — would be more contentious. Michael Ford, a barrister and professor at Bristol university, said much of the complexity employers faced in calculating holiday pay was the result of domestic legislation, rather than the judgments of the ECJ, although UK employers also disliked the ECJ’s stance in principle. Unions have brought a series of cases on the underpayment of holiday entitlements and employers would love to see them overturned, Mr Leckey said.
    but meester assured me that they wouldn't!
    Isn't this already covered by the "brexit act" or whatever they called it. Should the UK flex it's powers like this, they get to impose trade sanctions ?
    Please don't teach me what to do with my pc.

  4. #15944
    Malcanis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Itiken View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Malcanis View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by GeromeDoutrande View Post
    UK workers’ rights at risk in plans to rip up EU labour market rules
    Post-Brexit shake-up of regulations including 48-hour week likely to spark trade union outrage
    https://www.ft.com/content/55588f86-...b-38723b787569

      Spoiler:
    The package of deregulatory measures is being put together by the UK’s business department (Beis) with the approval of Downing Street, according to people familiar with the matter. It has not yet been agreed by ministers — or put to the cabinet — but select business leaders have been sounded out on the plan. The proposed shake-up of regulations from the “working time directive” will delight many Tory MPs but is likely to spark outrage among Britain’s trade union leaders. The move would potentially mark a clear divergence from EU labour market standards but the UK would only face retaliation from Brussels under the terms of its new post-Brexit trade treaty if the EU could demonstrate the changes had a material impact on competition.

    The main areas of focus are on ending the 48-hour working week, tweaking the rules around rest breaks at work and not including overtime pay when calculating some holiday pay entitlements, according to people familiar with the plans. The government also wants to remove the requirement of businesses to log the detailed, daily reporting of working hours, saving an estimated £1bn. The government insisted that any reforms would be designed to help both companies and their employees — and put to a full consultation — saying it had no intention of “lowering” workers’ rights.*“The UK has one of the best workers’ rights records in the world,” a government spokesperson said. “Leaving the EU allows us to continue to be a standard setter and protect and enhance UK workers’ rights.”

    But Ed Miliband, Labour’s business secretary, said the proposals were a “disgrace” at a time when so many people were worried about their jobs. “In the midst of the worst economic crisis in three centuries, ministers are preparing to tear up their promises to the British people and taking a sledgehammer to workers’ rights,” he said.*“Workers in the UK are the primary beneficiaries of the very positive judgments of the European courts,” said an official at the Trades Union Congress, adding that any attempt to “whittle down and narrow” the interpretation of European law “is a concern because it amounts to a diminution of rights”.

    EU officials have said that decisions on whether to trigger tariffs and other “rebalancing measures” against the UK under the recently-signed post-Brexit trade deal would depend on the practical effects of policy decisions. Brussels has often highlighted labour market standards as a core issue for the “level playing field” that the deal is meant to uphold, but regulation of working time at EU level is patchy, with Brussels seeking repeatedly to shore up how the directive is applied. Britain, along with many EU countries, opted out from enforcing the 48-hour limit on the working week as a member state. The government points out that the UK often “gold plates” EU minimum standards — such as offering 5.6 weeks of annual leave compared with the EU requirement of 4 weeks. But in a call with 250 leading business figures earlier this month, prime minister Boris Johnson urged industry to get behind plans for future regulatory liberalisation after Brexit — to the delight of many free marketeers in his cabinet.

    Matt Kilcoyne, deputy head of the free market Adam Smith Institute, welcomed the proposals — saying the current “one size fits all” 48-hour rule was a “straitjacket on the economy”. Yet there will be nerves at the top of government about how a shake-up of employment rights will be received among low-paid working class voters who backed the Tories in northern “Red Wall” seats in the December 2019 general election.

    A change in the calculation of holiday pay could be “a significant monetary loss” for a low paid worker often forced into overtime to make ends meet, the TUC official said. It is also not clear that business, which is already adjusting to Brexit and battling the fallout from the Covid-19 pandemic, is currently clamouring for a fundamental overhaul of workers’ rights. Mark Fox, chief executive of the Business Services Association, said his members wanted reforms that “enhance stability” rather than cause disruption. “We are also mindful of the prime minister’s call to ‘level up’ and that must always mean improving the environment in which people work.” Adam Marshall, director-general of the British Chambers of Commerce, said the immediate priority for business after Brexit was to focus on developing a stable trading relationship with the EU. Any deregulatory dividend was likely to come in emerging sectors such as fintech or health tech, he added. Colin Leckey, partner in employment law at Lewis Silkin, said employers would welcome the UK rejecting new European case law requiring the detailed, daily reporting of working hours.

    However, any move to overturn recent European case law on holiday pay — which stipulates that sales commissions and overtime must be taken into account in its calculation — would be more contentious. Michael Ford, a barrister and professor at Bristol university, said much of the complexity employers faced in calculating holiday pay was the result of domestic legislation, rather than the judgments of the ECJ, although UK employers also disliked the ECJ’s stance in principle. Unions have brought a series of cases on the underpayment of holiday entitlements and employers would love to see them overturned, Mr Leckey said.
    but meester assured me that they wouldn't!
    Isn't this already covered by the "brexit act" or whatever they called it. Should the UK flex it's powers like this, they get to impose trade sanctions ?
    but meester assured me they wouldn't!
    Quote Originally Posted by Isyel View Post
    And btw, you're such a fucking asshole it genuinely amazes me on a regular basis how you manage to function.

  5. #15945
    GeromeDoutrande's Avatar
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    There has to be an economic advantage for the other party to take action. If the UK government changes the working time directive and no economic advantage for UK workers results from that, then there are no grounds for complaining. If there is a change that creates an economic advantage, then they get to complain about it and ultimately could "take measures". An example for the latter would be the UK changing regulations on working hours so that UK truck drivers can work, say, two hours longer than EU truck drivers.

  6. #15946
    GeromeDoutrande's Avatar
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    Estate agents: The unsung frontline heroes of the pandemic
    https://www.thedailymash.co.uk/news/...20210115204291

  7. #15947

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    Police accidentally delete 150,000 arrest records - https://www.theguardian.com/politics...identally-lost

    I'm not sure how I feel about this. On the one hand, this is a major cock up. On the other hand, a lot of that DNA evidence was being held illegally anyway.

  8. #15948

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    My first thought seeing that was "i wonder what prompted that accident". Probably perfectly innocent.Guv.
    Please don't teach me what to do with my pc.

  9. #15949
    Keckers's Avatar
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    Isn't this a thick of it plot?

    ah yes
    Look, the wages you withheld from the workmen who mowed your fields are crying out against you. The cries of the harvesters have reached the ears of the Lord of Hosts. You have lived on earth in luxury and self-indulgence. You have fattened yourselves for slaughter.

  10. #15950
    Paradox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Appleby View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Paradox View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Shaikar View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Appleby View Post
    You guys have a 48h week? Here it's 40, 42* at the most. Quite a few unions got 38.5 and 35h weeks in their contracts (which extend to all employees regardless of union membership).

    * government workers have that
    God no, not as standard.
    I'm sure there's a host of shit jobs where it's expected (or you want/need to, to scrape cash together etc) but mostly 35-40ish is the usual.
    My record is 72 hours in a week
    I probably hit that as well during crunch times like exams where the written exams need to be graded before the oral exams while regular lessons for other classes are ongoing. But that's offset by school breaks obviously.

    Tapapapatalk
    Yeah. I offset mine by quitting the shit out of that job. The teacher hours would be unsustainable for me


    Poland treats me like shit and I hate them as a result of it

  11. #15951
    Venec's Avatar
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  12. #15952
    rufuske's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Venec View Post
    Why does it end at 1:00, it was starting to get good.

  13. #15953
    Totally Not Larkonnis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rufuske View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Venec View Post
    Why does it end at 1:00, it was starting to get good.
    Due to Brexit regulations all youtube parodies featuring Bozza are limited to maximum length of one minute...


  14. #15954
    rufuske's Avatar
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    Please hand over your ham to the nearest depository point.

  15. #15955
    Totally Not Larkonnis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rufuske View Post
    Please hand over your ham to the nearest depository point.


    That news is now two weeks old... so have a small low effort meme response.


  16. #15956
    DerWish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Totally Not Larkonnis View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by rufuske View Post
    Please hand over your ham to the nearest depository point.


    That news is now two weeks old... so have a small low effort meme response.
    Don't worry, this meme will remain gold for generations to come.
    Although I understand why you would like to forget it as soon as possible.

  17. #15957
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    Quote Originally Posted by rufuske View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Venec View Post
      Spoiler:
    Why does it end at 1:00, it was starting to get good.
    It doesn't go much further than that, sadly =(


    Le coeur a ses raisons que la raison ne connaît point. - Blaise Pascal, Pensées, 277

  18. #15958
    Pegging Specialist Donor indi's Avatar
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    Found on Reddit - does mesh with expectations of possible food shortages pre-Brexit, not sure if it's recent / current:


  19. #15959
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    Here we go, that's the reality of Brexit and how it impacts british business:

    Lots of extra charges mounting up at minimum to 23.50£ for every parcel send into the E.U.
    https://www.theguardian.com/politics...ish-businesses

    Roughly £5.3bn worth of European trades left the London Stock Exchange for markets inside the EU on the first day of trading this year:
    https://www.theguardian.com/commenti...rivalry-brexit


    I hope you can all see the broader implication of the parcel charges. If is isn't for a very specialized product that only Britain produces any European will just don't buy from Britain anymore because it will be more expansive.
    Last edited by Jori McKie; January 17 2021 at 10:05:21 AM.

  20. #15960
    DerWish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jori McKie View Post
    Here we go, that's the reality of Brexit and how it impacts british business:

    Lots of extra charges mounting up at minimum to 23.50£ for every parcel send into the E.U.
    https://www.theguardian.com/politics...ish-businesses

    Roughly £5.3bn worth of European trades left the London Stock Exchange for markets inside the EU on the first day of trading this year:
    https://www.theguardian.com/commenti...rivalry-brexit


    I hope you can all see the broader implication of the parcel charges. If is isn't for a very specialized product that only Britain produces any European will just don't buy from Britain anymore because it will be more expansive.
    You can add how the steel industry got kneecapped in the UK.
    Mind-boggling situation with the musicians / artists visa.
    The 50 pound fine per hour while a lorry driver is waiting for his papers.
    Consultancy contracts across the Channel going up in flames.

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