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Thread: (UK EURO THREAD) UK POLITICS MK2

  1. #17541

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    There are also some rumours circulating about Johnson taking out a super-injunction banning reporting on his affair with a Russian violinist.
    Last edited by Rodj Blake; March 28 2021 at 08:50:12 AM.

  2. #17542
    Duckslayer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rodj Blake View Post
    There are also some rumours circulating about Johnson taking out a super-injunction banning reporting on his affair with a Russian violinist.
    That one has been around for months


  3. #17543
    Joe Appleby's Avatar
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    https://global247news.com/2021/03/26...gals-in-spain/

    What started out to be a dream life in the sun, has turned into a nightmare for thousands of Brits who didn’t wish to be legally registered as a resident in Spain.

    By not being legally registered, Brits until now, have gone under the radar when it came to paying Spanish taxes and other contributions, but Brexit has changed that, now they have to be out of Spain by March 31 when they will be deemed as illegal immigrants and deported anyway as their 90-day legal stay ends.

    It’s not just the tax dodgers though that are affected, some ex-pats have been declined residency despite applying whilst others amazingly missed deadlines to apply, believing nothing would actually happen until cops started preparing deportation plans in anticipation of the deadline date.

    Spain’s police force and authorities are expecting to deport 500 UK citizens within the first week, with targets already earmarked to be picked up and deported home, knowingly to the authorities not having the correct paperwork to remain.
    https://www.reddit.com/r/LeopardsAte..._europe_would/



    ” Yes I voted out, but I didn’t realise it would come to this, my application has been rejected and we are on our way home – the wife is in tears, she’s distraught if I’m honest and I’m not too happy at the prospect of returning back to the UK.

    “I’ve loved living on the Costa del Sol and after 5 years can’t believe it has come to this, we applied but got rejected and so have no choice, although long term I think the Spanish will regret chucking us out of Spain”
    For permanent residency he would have had to prove an income of €25,500 + €6,400 for his wife, annually along with private health insurance.
    Last edited by Joe Appleby; March 28 2021 at 12:22:36 PM.
    nevar forget

  4. #17544
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Appleby View Post
    ” Yes I voted out, but I didn’t realise it would come to this, my application has been rejected and we are on our way home – the wife is in tears, she’s distraught if I’m honest and I’m not too happy at the prospect of returning back to the UK.

    “I’ve loved living on the Costa del Sol and after 5 years can’t believe it has come to this, we applied but got rejected and so have no choice, although long term I think the Spanish will regret chucking us out of Spain”
    I tend to wonder whether these kinds of anecdotes are true, but do quite enjoy them either way.

  5. #17545
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    The pandemic is stirring deep resentments in Europe. They may not be quick to heal

    CNN

    https://www.cnn.com/2021/03/27/europ...cmd/index.html


  6. #17546

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    Quote Originally Posted by Keckers View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by duckduck View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Rodj Blake View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by NoirAvlaa View Post
    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/l...ncil-dshb7wbsd

    Sir Keir Starmer is preparing to back government moves to take over the running of Liverpool, one of his party’s key strongholds, after a property development scandal.
    jesus christ the uk is fucked. fuck the tories.
    This comes hot on the heels of Starmer deciding he didn't like who was on the shortlist for the next Liverpool mayor and subsequently ripping it up.
    Yeah. I'm losing faith quite quickly now. Starmer's key pitch was that he'd be a safe pair of hands. If he can't deliver competency, what has he got?
    Support of the PLP.
    He may even be losing that...

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics...s-lack-of-grip

  7. #17547

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    Kinda funny how people dodging all of the taxes and just freeloading are prone to get deported.

  8. #17548
    Joe Appleby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by depili View Post
    Kinda funny how people dodging all of the taxes and just freeloading are prone to get deported.
    I was a bit surprised that a few of them didn't register as residents to avoid paying taxes. Even before Brexit that would have been illegal. I hope the Spanish will look into that.

    Tapapapatalk
    nevar forget

  9. #17549
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rodj Blake View Post
    Today's Mirror has got an interview with Jennifer Arcuri, so sick bags at the ready:

    Vomit comit


  10. #17550

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    How long does the Brits retiring to Spain thing go back?

    I remember it being part of the plot of some movies, and even knew some EVE players in the late 00s who did it.

  11. #17551

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    Quote Originally Posted by Boltorano View Post
    How long does the Brits retiring to Spain thing go back?

    I remember it being part of the plot of some movies, and even knew some EVE players in the late 00s who did it.
    It was very big in the 60s and 70 among those who the police were keen to speak to, but then the extradition treaty came along.
    Last edited by Rodj Blake; March 28 2021 at 02:33:40 PM.

  12. #17552

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sp4m View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Rodj Blake View Post
    Today's Mirror has got an interview with Jennifer Arcuri, so sick bags at the ready:

    Vomit comit
    It's political erectness gone mad.

  13. #17553
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rodj Blake View Post
    Today's Mirror has got an interview with Jennifer Arcuri, so sick bags at the ready:

    Based.


  14. #17554
    Movember 2011 RazoR's Avatar
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    She's 36 years old? jfc

  15. #17555
    evil edna's Avatar
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    36 long hard years

  16. #17556
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    Where is the boy Sp4m?

  17. #17557
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    Cross posting after thread derp

    Quote Originally Posted by Pattern View Post
    Also
    On Friday, I saw hundreds of peaceful protestors sitting in front of the line of riot police for hours – right next to the police station where Sunday’s riot had taken place. There was music and chanting, and flowers were handed to officers. The protest was in defiance of Covid restrictions, and some eggs and drinks cans were thrown at police lines, but at that time there were no direct clashes. Indeed, there were chants of “peaceful protest! peaceful protest!”.

    At around 10pm, however, police forcefully advanced into the sitting crowd, hitting them with riot shields and batons. My colleagues filmed protesters being struck repeatedly by riot shields and knocked to the ground. A number of protesters suffered head wounds.

    After police dispersed the protest by charging with horses and dogs, there were clashes with some people. Fireworks and projectiles were thrown, with one firework hitting a police horse. The night’s events were described by the police as “violent disorder”, but they reported no injuries to officers.

    Over the weekend, more videos have emerged of police violence from Friday night: a photographer being hit over the head by a riot shield while pushed up against a fence; a protester being pushed face-first into a concrete pillar; another lying on the ground being dragged and beaten with batons.

    Reporting in the aftermath of events like these is crucial in setting the narrative. After Sunday’s riot, Avon and Somerset police said that officers had suffered broken bones and a punctured lung. Days later, after this claim had been widely reported, they retracted it. Yet by then police injuries had helped set the tone, and the imagery in most of the national reporting was of violent mobs wreaking havoc.

    After strongly condemning Sunday’s riot as a “shameful day” for the city, Bristol’s Labour mayor, Marvin Rees, said this weekend that the actions of some protesters on Friday had been “politically illiterate and strategically inept”, and declined to condemn the police’s tactics.

    Having people on the ground to document the chronology of how events escalate and unfold is vital. As such, it was particularly worrying to see the attacks on members of the press over the past week. A Daily Mirror journalist shared video footage showing police pushing him and hitting him with a baton as he shouted he was a member of the press.

    During Tuesday’s protest a police officer physically confronted two of my colleagues, threatening them with arrest and use of force even though they identified themselves as journalists and their press credentials were clearly visible. Avon and Somerset police later apologised, describing the conduct as “not acceptable”. Another well known local journalist had also been detained after police didn’t believe he was from the media.

    After local journalists had risked harm to themselves for the third time in six days to accurately document the events, it was incredibly frustrating to see the national media framing the events in line with Priti Patel and Boris Johnson’s condemnations of the protests as “violent thuggery”.

    The national public risks being misled about how events unfolded, imagining scenes similar to the police vans set ablaze last Sunday. In fact, a 10-minute scan of excellent reporting from multiple media sources in Bristol would have given any national journalist a more complete picture of what happened.
    It's almost as if they don't want the nation to have a complete picture of what happened. I wonder why that might be?
    Look, the wages you withheld from the workmen who mowed your fields are crying out against you. The cries of the harvesters have reached the ears of the Lord of Hosts. You have lived on earth in luxury and self-indulgence. You have fattened yourselves for slaughter.

  18. #17558
    Super Chillerator Global Moderator teds :D's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keckers View Post
    Cross posting after thread derp

    Quote Originally Posted by Pattern View Post
    Also
    On Friday, I saw hundreds of peaceful protestors sitting in front of the line of riot police for hours – right next to the police station where Sunday’s riot had taken place. There was music and chanting, and flowers were handed to officers. The protest was in defiance of Covid restrictions, and some eggs and drinks cans were thrown at police lines, but at that time there were no direct clashes. Indeed, there were chants of “peaceful protest! peaceful protest!”.

    At around 10pm, however, police forcefully advanced into the sitting crowd, hitting them with riot shields and batons. My colleagues filmed protesters being struck repeatedly by riot shields and knocked to the ground. A number of protesters suffered head wounds.

    After police dispersed the protest by charging with horses and dogs, there were clashes with some people. Fireworks and projectiles were thrown, with one firework hitting a police horse. The night’s events were described by the police as “violent disorder”, but they reported no injuries to officers.

    Over the weekend, more videos have emerged of police violence from Friday night: a photographer being hit over the head by a riot shield while pushed up against a fence; a protester being pushed face-first into a concrete pillar; another lying on the ground being dragged and beaten with batons.

    Reporting in the aftermath of events like these is crucial in setting the narrative. After Sunday’s riot, Avon and Somerset police said that officers had suffered broken bones and a punctured lung. Days later, after this claim had been widely reported, they retracted it. Yet by then police injuries had helped set the tone, and the imagery in most of the national reporting was of violent mobs wreaking havoc.

    After strongly condemning Sunday’s riot as a “shameful day” for the city, Bristol’s Labour mayor, Marvin Rees, said this weekend that the actions of some protesters on Friday had been “politically illiterate and strategically inept”, and declined to condemn the police’s tactics.

    Having people on the ground to document the chronology of how events escalate and unfold is vital. As such, it was particularly worrying to see the attacks on members of the press over the past week. A Daily Mirror journalist shared video footage showing police pushing him and hitting him with a baton as he shouted he was a member of the press.

    During Tuesday’s protest a police officer physically confronted two of my colleagues, threatening them with arrest and use of force even though they identified themselves as journalists and their press credentials were clearly visible. Avon and Somerset police later apologised, describing the conduct as “not acceptable”. Another well known local journalist had also been detained after police didn’t believe he was from the media.

    After local journalists had risked harm to themselves for the third time in six days to accurately document the events, it was incredibly frustrating to see the national media framing the events in line with Priti Patel and Boris Johnson’s condemnations of the protests as “violent thuggery”.

    The national public risks being misled about how events unfolded, imagining scenes similar to the police vans set ablaze last Sunday. In fact, a 10-minute scan of excellent reporting from multiple media sources in Bristol would have given any national journalist a more complete picture of what happened.
    It's almost as if they don't want the nation to have a complete picture of what happened. I wonder why that might be?
    most likely because they'd had officer reports come in, and their press team were being hammered by news agencies enquiries, and they panicked and took the first word. very, very poor, but i can understand it happening. cop press teams, for balance tend to be about 5-10 people.

    (unless you're the met)

  19. #17559

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    Quote Originally Posted by teds :D View Post

    most likely because they'd had officer reports come in, and their press team were being hammered by news agencies enquiries, and they panicked and took the first word. very, very poor, but i can understand it happening. cop press teams, for balance tend to be about 5-10 people.

    (unless you're the met)
    That's far too generous. First of all, that can only happen if the officer reports are inaccurate i.e. a culture of lying with impunity.

    Taking a step back, it's a system that pushes out politically convenient untruths on the night, ready for the next morning's front pages. Then a few days later, it retracts them ('honest mistake, gov') and no-one but a few forum geeks hear or care about it.

  20. #17560
    GeromeDoutrande's Avatar
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    Bank of England clamps down on Brexit-driven EU relocations
    UK regulator concerned that continent counterparts demanding more to move than necessary
    https://www.ft.com/content/ba285268-...8-bba24155664c

    The Bank of England is demanding that lenders seek its approval before relocating UK jobs or operations to the EU, after becoming concerned that European regulators are asking for more to move than is necessary for financial stability after Brexit. The BoE has taken this stance — described by one senior banker as “increasingly curmudgeonly” — after hearing of several requests from the European Central Bank that it considers excessive and beyond what is required from a prudential supervisory perspective, according to people familiar with the move. Governor Andrew Bailey has taken a personal interest in the issue, they added. UK politicians and regulators have long been concerned that their European counterparts are attempting to poach as much financial services business as possible under the guise of repatriating robust oversight of all euro-related financial activities. They fear the loss of associated jobs, tax revenue and prestige. However, the BoE’s new stance has been criticised as regulatory “over-reach” by international bankers, who feel that they are caught between the politicised demands of the UK central bank and the ECB’s Single Supervisory Mechanism. “Being told in advance of banks' plans is one thing, but requiring regulatory approval first is quite another,” said one senior adviser to a US bank in London. The BoE and ECB declined to comment.

    The move also risks further inflaming tensions between the UK and Europe amid delicate political negotiations over their post-Brexit relationship for financial services. Last week, Britain and the EU agreed to set up a new “talking shop” on regulatory co-operation, but the EU has still not indicated whether it will grant “equivalence” status to British regulations. Under this mechanism, the EU would recognise UK financial rules as equivalent to its own and vice versa, which restore to London a degree of the direct access to the bloc it lost after the split.

    Banks that are deemed to be taking unnecessary risk can have their regulatory capital requirements increased by the BoE’s Prudential Regulation Authority.*The new BoE requirements not only apply to UK and EU banks but also those from third countries such as the US or Switzerland. In the past they used London as a base to “passport” their financial services into the continent. Brexit meant that the UK lost this unrestricted access and as a result many lenders set up or bolstered their operations inside the EU, notably in Paris, Frankfurt and Amsterdam.

    While London has lost big chunks of euro-denominated share and derivative trading to Amsterdam, there has not been the exodus of jobs or revenue from London that some had predicted. EY estimates only 7,600 UK jobs and £1.3tn in assets have been transferred to the continent. EU regulators have insisted that banks cannot operate small “brass-plate” entities inside the bloc, with top executives, risk-taking staff such as traders and compliance officials remaining in London.*The BoE’s Prudential Regulation Authority accepted this stance and in the run-up to Brexit required lenders to draw up detailed models for what their businesses would look like initially and over a longer period of time. These were known as “day 1” and “day 2” plans. However, the BoE now believes that the EU is trying to force banks to go beyond the agreed “day 2” planning, the people familiar said. The PRA is concerned that “ad hoc” requests to transfer more business and leadership could undermine the safety and soundness of lenders’ London-based operations.

    One example being examined is that the SSM has suggested to some large American banks that they should only operate one trading desk to handle all transactions of a particular financial product within the same timezone, one of the people said. This may stem from the ECB’s push to stop banks making excessive use of a controversial technique known as “back-to-back” operations that lets them transfer the risk of EU deals to a parallel transaction in the UK. One person briefed on the matter said the ECB was not seeking that banks do more than stick to their Brexit plans under the “target operating models” agreed with supervisors.

    Andrea Enria, chair of supervision at the ECB, told the European Parliament last week that supervisors were still in discussions with banks “to ensure that in the post-Brexit world they allocate enough staff and assets to institutions inside the banking union.” He said this was “necessary to ensure adequate management of risks both in and from Europe”.

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