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Thread: GDPR stuff

  1. #41

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    I asked this at a conference / sales thingy. The rough outline is GDPR is an update to DPA, and supplants it, EU or non-EU.
    Any country which wants to do any business at all with the EU must adopt it, or at least the relevant parts of it.

    I'm a bit hazy on the details because Christmas and sleep deprivation from Child, but the upshot is "yes, even with hard brexit, we have to (have) implemented GDPR.

    also - All EU directives will be carried over, then altered one by one. Something the dickhead hard gammons don't get.
    Please don't teach me what to do with my pc.

  2. #42
    Super Chillerator Global Moderator teds :D's Avatar
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    ^

    same problem lots of US companies had with brexit (hence the 'PLEASE ACCEPT OUR TERMS' buttons appearing on every fucking website).

  3. #43
    Donor erichkknaar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by teds :D View Post
    ^

    same problem lots of US companies had with brexit (hence the 'PLEASE ACCEPT OUR TERMS' buttons appearing on every fucking website).
    Please accept our terms IS gdpr, mostly. The US companies who won’t be forced to incur extra expense because of the E.U., and rightly so, simply block Europeans, like the LA times. Maybe some UK sites will do the same.

  4. #44
    Super Chillerator Global Moderator teds :D's Avatar
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    woops i typo'd. meant GDPR not brexit, and it's an example of what the UK would have to do if they ditch GDPR

  5. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by Itiken View Post
    I asked this at a conference / sales thingy. The rough outline is GDPR is an update to DPA, and supplants it, EU or non-EU.
    Any country which wants to do any business at all with the EU must adopt it, or at least the relevant parts of it.

    I'm a bit hazy on the details because Christmas and sleep deprivation from Child, but the upshot is "yes, even with hard brexit, we have to (have) implemented GDPR.

    also - All EU directives will be carried over, then altered one by one. Something the dickhead hard gammons don't get.
    So am I correct in reading this as "Will (most likely) be implemented soon(tm), but as of now it's not and possibly won't until March 29th."?

  6. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by Itiken View Post
    I asked this at a conference / sales thingy. The rough outline is GDPR is an update to DPA, and supplants it, EU or non-EU.
    Any country which wants to do any business at all with the EU must adopt it, or at least the relevant parts of it.
    Correct. The GDPR supplants the Data Protection Directive. As a "Directive" rather than a "Regulation", each member state implemented its own local legislation to implement the directive. In the UK this is the DPA 1998.

    As a Regulation, the GDPR is law in all EU member states by default and on a common basis. This was done because harmonisation of the various data protection regimes was deemed to be as important as strengthening data protections. GDPR entirely replaces the DPD.

    I'm a bit hazy on the details because Christmas and sleep deprivation from Child, but the upshot is "yes, even with hard brexit, we have to (have) implemented GDPR.
    So, there's two sides to this story.

    One side is the role of the UK as a third country. We'll be in a similar position to the US, where our companies will no longer be directly bound by the GDPR (because it's an EU Reg, not a Directive with a local Law), but are effectively required to abide by it in order to to do business with the EU.

    The other side is the role of the UK's own data protection law. Last year we chose, independently of Brexit, to pass the Data Protection Act 2018, which came into force in May of last year. It implements GDPR into UK law in full, specifically contextualising certain terms to our own political and legal systems. GDPR is UK law regardless of what happens with Brexit. This was a conscious choice taken by the government to minimise disruption, improve the state of our own archaic data protection laws and to aim for a state post brexit where we've got sufficient legal protections in place that we can be treated as equivalent to an EU nation for GDPR purposes.

    also - All EU directives will be carried over, then altered one by one.
    Bit technical this one. They won't be carried over, because directives are enacted by local laws which (mostly) have no dependency on EU membership. Directives aren't European law per se, they're the EU asking member states to pass laws in their own countries to implement common plans. Regulations will cease to be in force through virtue of our membership of the EU, but almost certainly* will continue to be in force as part of the brexit process.

    *All usual caveats around who the fuck knows what we're actually going to end up doing apply.
    Last edited by elmicker; January 5 2019 at 06:36:48 PM.

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