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Thread: Testing RAM

  1. #1
    Lief Siddhe's Avatar
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    Testing RAM

    So, what's the best program(s) nowadays to check if my RAM is faulty or ok?

    Furthermore, how do I check if my motherboard is starting to go haywire?

    Comp has been restarting by itself in the middle of work last 2-3 days and I recently put some RAM in, so might as well start with RAM tests before I go onward in the investigation

    While yer at it, gimme links to some gud diagnostics tools (I'm using Windows 10) and in which order should I be checking components

    Cheers guise
    Last edited by Lief Siddhe; November 27 2017 at 01:52:32 PM.
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  2. #2
    Daneel Trevize's Avatar
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    Grub2 has a memtest86 option built in iirc, so any decent Live ISO should offer it from a USB image. P sure Debian 8+ has it (at least it's a boot option once installed, not Live previewing). Else, obtain a legit copy of memtest86+ some other way, should be any need to buy the .com fork version.

    If you put in new RAM/have more than 1 stick, start the game of using 1 at a time, in a different slot each test, until you find the obvious fault. While not being dumb about static risk.

    The other thing to check is timings & voltages, ensure no overclock or on-board-RAM (XMP?) performance profile is in effect that may be causing it.
    And check your BIOS is up to date if newer sticks are only compatible with newer tweaks to that.
    Last edited by Daneel Trevize; November 27 2017 at 02:29:33 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by QuackBot View Post
    Idk about that, and i'm fucking stupid.

  3. #3
    Movember 2012 Zekk Pacus's Avatar
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    memtest86 is still the best way to test it.

    There's no real great way to test it in Windows, you need something that boots into a separate instance. There are valid reasons for this, fucked if I know why.
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  4. #4
    Movember 2011Movember 2012 Nordstern's Avatar
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    Thirding the use of memtest86, also get CPU-Z to view info about your CPU/RAM and AIDA64 to stress test your system.

    While you're at it, get GPU-Z.
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  5. #5
    Daneel Trevize's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zekk Pacus View Post
    There are valid reasons for this, fucked if I know why.
    Because an OS reserves some physical address space for its own use, that doesn't depend upon virtual memory mappings, as a method to bootstrap the whole process & abstraction layer.
    And an OS won't run a memcheck on that RAM, so it'd not be tested, where as an-OS(kernel)-written-purely-to-check AKA memtest86 can & will.
    And that also means you don't need to fuck around with running a system-level-privileged process which has to then 'manually' manage which physical addresses exist and are being mapped to virtual ones, to ensure all physical ones are tested.
    Remember, the magic of virtualised memory is every process sees the full 32/64bit RAM space as available to just itself, no matter how much or little physical hardware is backing it up or how busy it is, it's all overlapped & juggled by the OS + CPU (and, god-forbid, incurs swapping to disk).
    Last edited by Daneel Trevize; November 27 2017 at 06:53:11 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by QuackBot View Post
    Idk about that, and i'm fucking stupid.

  6. #6
    Cosmin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zekk Pacus View Post
    memtest86 is still the best way to test it.

    There's no real great way to test it in Windows, you need something that boots into a separate instance. There are valid reasons for this, fucked if I know why.
    This. Almost completely smashed my system to bits due to a faulty 8GB module. RMAd the whole kit after identifying it with bootable memtest, happy puppy now ^^

    Took fking forever though to test all 8 sticks, obviously the broken one ended up being the 6th or 7th, had to test one more for completion's sake.
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  7. #7

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    Dell machines these days have a buildin test/diagnostics option, reachable at the one time boot option (F12 during boot). That includes a mem test as well.

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