hate these ads?, log in or register to hide them
Page 11 of 11 FirstFirst ... 891011
Results 201 to 219 of 219

Thread: Zekk Pacus' AMD Ryze(n) hardware thread, July 2017

  1. #201
    root's Avatar
    Join Date
    April 26, 2011
    Location
    The Camel Empire
    Posts
    2,978
    In the comments I read that the patch is only "active" when it needs to be. So it's not a slowdown across the board.
    The Rapier is my love boat
    ~lowsec smallscale pvp 'n stuff~

  2. #202

    Join Date
    November 5, 2011
    Posts
    9,489
    Quote Originally Posted by root View Post
    In the comments I read that the patch is only "active" when it needs to be. So it's not a slowdown across the board.
    OK that's a bit better if true. Depends how often it needs to be on mind.

    Sent from my Nexus 5X using Tapatalk

  3. #203
    Donor
    Join Date
    April 9, 2011
    Posts
    1,321
    Quote Originally Posted by root View Post
    In the comments I read that the patch is only "active" when it needs to be. So it's not a slowdown across the board.
    From what I can gather the patch moves the OS kernel into its own private virtual address space. So affected processors are always going to take a performance hit, just how big the hit is will depend on the particular application or workload.

  4. #204
    root's Avatar
    Join Date
    April 26, 2011
    Location
    The Camel Empire
    Posts
    2,978
    Yeah, a ton of comments are conflicting with each other.
    I'm just going to wait what the end result is before I jump on the "30% PERF HIT!" wagon.
    The Rapier is my love boat
    ~lowsec smallscale pvp 'n stuff~

  5. #205
    Donor
    Join Date
    April 9, 2011
    Posts
    1,321
    Apparently this is now big enough that the MSM have picked up. The Telegraph is running it as the lead story on their site. Intel PR is going to have a very bad week, trying to explain why they didn't catch the problem for a decade and that every chip they sell for the next year or so will still be flawed.

    It's also a great illustration for non-technical people of why critical systems like medical devices and avionics use processor designs that are 20, 30 or 40 years old: because all the bugs and flaws are known and can be accounted for, so you don't get bitten in the arse by things like this.

  6. #206
    Cosmin's Avatar
    Join Date
    March 14, 2012
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    5,497
    Non paywall version so we can see how apocalyptically it's presented?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Guns make the news, science doesn't.
    Six shooters ruined PvP.
    What are you doing with your life?İDoomchinchilla 2015

  7. #207

    Join Date
    April 10, 2011
    Posts
    3,509
    Welp thats it, im going AMD this year. That is, if the patch actually doesnt catch AMDs in the crossfire as well.

  8. #208
    Donor
    Join Date
    April 9, 2011
    Posts
    1,321
    Quote Originally Posted by Cosmin View Post
    Non paywall version so we can see how apocalyptically it's presented?
    Gah, forgot about the paywall.

    Millions of computers using Intel chips are prone to hacking because of a flaw that went unnoticed for a decade, it has emerged.

    Software giants are currently working on a fix for the flaw but industry experts have warned it could potentially slow down all devices running the chips by up to 30 per cent.

    The flaw could allow hackers a "persistent and undetectable backdoor into someone's computer", Mike Godfrey, cyber expert at Insinia Security told the Telegraph.

    The flaw grants access to a computer's kernel, which runs and stores every function on the device, and means an outsider could potentially bypass antivirus or firewall security software without the owner knowing. It could allow malicious software to steal passwords and sensitive files.

    Intel chips appear in almost all personal computers and other technology. Financial institutions and businesses with large IT infrastructure may have been compromised for several years, Godfrey added. Train systems and autonomous cars also use the chips.

    Intel has reportedly warned software vendors including Microsoft, Amazon and Apple, who are believed to be creating a workaround to fix the flaw. But this fix could make computers 30 per cent slower, according to technology website The Register.

    Matthew Hickey, security expert and co-founder at My Hacker House said: "The real problem is for companies trying to support customers on their servers. Hypothetically, if a company once had capacity to support 100,000 users, that number may drop to 70,000.

    "It could have real cost implications for businesses that have been using or intend to use cloud technology and Intel servers."

    The bug has been known by security workers for some time, but is not due to be publicly disclosed until software giants like Amazon and Microsoft have issued a patch, so that the details cannot be exploited by criminals. Fixes are expected to be released in the next week.

    Intel itself is unable to fix the flaw, so guarding against it requires a software update that will slow computers by between 5 per cent and 30 per cent, or to fix the processors completely.

    Hundreds of millions of devices could be affected, including those still on the production lines.

    Mr Hickey added: "The real problems are for companies who are trying to get the best performance out of servers to support so many users. They may find that they had the capacity to support 100,000 users on their software, but that number could drop to 70,000. It could have real cost implications for business."

    It is unclear whether anyone has been hacked thanks to this flaw, but penetration tester at Insinia Security, Matthew Carr, told the Telegraph that it was not inconceivable that a vulnerability that has existed for ten years had already been exploited by nation states, criminal gangs or expert level hackers.

    Chip rival AMD shares soared 7.2 per cent after the disclosure on Wednesday, while Intel dropped to a low of 3.8 per cent.

    A spokesperson for the National Cyber Security Centre said: "We are aware of reports about a potential flaw affecting some computer processors. "At this stage there is no evidence of any malicious exploitation and patches are being produced for the major platforms.

    "The NCSC advises that all organisations and home users continue to protect their systems from threats by installing patches as soon as they become available."

    Intel have yet to comment on the matter. Microsoft had nothing to share and Google, Amazon and Apple are yet to comment.

  9. #209
    Daneel Trevize's Avatar
    Join Date
    April 10, 2011
    Location
    T L A
    Posts
    12,171
    Got to step #17 of a 30 step disassembly (so 60 in total to rebuild) to perform a RAM upgrade, discovered the Phillips #00 in my new cheap set is machined so badly it's like a triangle, the intersection of the 2 pseudo-blades is about a whole mm to one side of centre. Not convinced the blades are fine enough either.

    Reconnecting "ZIF" ribbon cables is AIDS, but successful (for now).
    Quote Originally Posted by QuackBot View Post
    Idk about that, and i'm fucking stupid.

  10. #210
    Cosmin's Avatar
    Join Date
    March 14, 2012
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    5,497
    I always put everything together only to forget the touchpad or similar.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Guns make the news, science doesn't.
    Six shooters ruined PvP.
    What are you doing with your life?İDoomchinchilla 2015

  11. #211
    Donor Aea's Avatar
    Join Date
    April 13, 2011
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    14,304
    Quote Originally Posted by Daneel Trevize View Post
    Got to step #17 of a 30 step disassembly (so 60 in total to rebuild) to perform a RAM upgrade, discovered the Phillips #00 in my new cheap set is machined so badly it's like a triangle, the intersection of the 2 pseudo-blades is about a whole mm to one side of centre. Not convinced the blades are fine enough either.

    Reconnecting "ZIF" ribbon cables is AIDS, but successful (for now).
    Phillips sucks. It might have gotten tucked up way after the machining.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  12. #212
    Daneel Trevize's Avatar
    Join Date
    April 10, 2011
    Location
    T L A
    Posts
    12,171
    I don't see how this wasn't a flaw in the machining.



    Ofc I didn't choose which screw head was chosed for this device, or that it's only used once in the entire process
    Quote Originally Posted by QuackBot View Post
    Idk about that, and i'm fucking stupid.

  13. #213
    XenosisMk4's Avatar
    Join Date
    July 13, 2017
    Location
    More turbo-lightspeed neoliberal platitudes/virtue signaling/misplaced priorities on full display.
    Posts
    2,089
    I sure am glad that my GPU now costs £150 more than what I paid for it

  14. #214
    Daneel Trevize's Avatar
    Join Date
    April 10, 2011
    Location
    T L A
    Posts
    12,171
    2nd set of drivers from the same retailer had the same machining problem, probably a batch of hundreds, if not thousands out there just like it. Took my refund and went to..:

    Different retailer, different brand, nearly 3x the price, same fucking problem on the sub-1 PH#s.

    And this time the claimed properly hardened CR-V steel also did this:



    This time the 00 (PHs are on the right) seems in better shape than the 0 (which I used the most/the Pozi equiv, and to me is still clearly mismachined, and probably too pointy) or 000 (which I didn't get to test).

    Got all 30 steps done, and reversed, and the fucking thing now won't POST fully anyway & I might have to do it all over just to remove the RAM upgrade before returning the drivers, again.
    I'm hoping it's just some compatibility problem with a genuine Samsung SODIMM.

    Fuck you China.

    edit: Got the SODIMM back out, device boots fine, even done a BIOS update. Dunno why a Samsung 1gb m470t2953ez3-ce6 isn't good enough.
    Last edited by Daneel Trevize; January 20 2018 at 03:26:07 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by QuackBot View Post
    Idk about that, and i'm fucking stupid.

  15. #215
    Cosmin's Avatar
    Join Date
    March 14, 2012
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    5,497
    Different voltages?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Guns make the news, science doesn't.
    Six shooters ruined PvP.
    What are you doing with your life?İDoomchinchilla 2015

  16. #216
    Daneel Trevize's Avatar
    Join Date
    April 10, 2011
    Location
    T L A
    Posts
    12,171
    I dunno, latest BIOS & disabling quick boot to ensure proper POST was all I can do, can't seem to adjust Vs and timings.

    The offending SODIMM in situ.

    Behold, (out of focus) an Intel CPU from this century that's immune to Meltdown & Spectre. And the dumbest design ever, to solder on the 512MB so you can't reach 2GB via the expansion slot.
    Quote Originally Posted by QuackBot View Post
    Idk about that, and i'm fucking stupid.

  17. #217
    Cosmin's Avatar
    Join Date
    March 14, 2012
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    5,497
    Some DDR3 is L, meaning 1.35V instead of 1.5V. They don't work at all in 1.5V systems.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Guns make the news, science doesn't.
    Six shooters ruined PvP.
    What are you doing with your life?İDoomchinchilla 2015

  18. #218
    Daneel Trevize's Avatar
    Join Date
    April 10, 2011
    Location
    T L A
    Posts
    12,171
    Yeah but it's a relic from DDR2 days.
    Quote Originally Posted by QuackBot View Post
    Idk about that, and i'm fucking stupid.

  19. #219
    Cosmin's Avatar
    Join Date
    March 14, 2012
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    5,497
    Sorry, I was on my phone, didn't realise it was DDR2.
    Guns make the news, science doesn't.
    Six shooters ruined PvP.
    What are you doing with your life?İDoomchinchilla 2015

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •