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Thread: Trump Keeps on #WINNING [USA Politics Thread]

  1. #25861
    Movember 2011Movember 2012 Nordstern's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maximillian View Post
    I also wonder if the USA is suffering from the "old farmer" trend where in Oz the average age of farmers has passed 56 years. So in ten years or so we'll suddenly have no farmers beyond massive agricultural corps flush with Chinese money.
    We are. But family farming won't be dead for at least another generation.
    "Holy shit, I ask you to stop being autistic and you debate what autistic is." - spasm
    Quote Originally Posted by Larkonis Trassler View Post
    WTF I hate white people now...

  2. #25862
    Movember 2011Movember 2012 Nordstern's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aea View Post
    Don't rural areas typically draw far more in subsidies and services than they pay in taxes?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Yes, and there has been a vigorous debate regarding LGA in Minnesota for decades. I'm in favor of scrapping it, on the premise that cities should not subsidize small towns, and local governments should be responsible for their own budgets. if we have to merge a few towns or counties, that's fine.
    "Holy shit, I ask you to stop being autistic and you debate what autistic is." - spasm
    Quote Originally Posted by Larkonis Trassler View Post
    WTF I hate white people now...

  3. #25863
    OrangeAfroMan's Avatar
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    I think the irony is that they think Trump will help them in any way. More likely to defund them and watch them starve.
    Actually an '06.

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  4. #25864
    Donor Tellenta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maximillian View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Nordstern View Post
    The small-town delusions continue...

    http://www.startribune.com/iron-rang...e/413499243/#1

      Spoiler:
    Iron Range residents look to Trump to 'get something done'
    Amid the protests and legal battles early in the Trump administration, his northern Minnesota supporters hope he'll honor his promise to make America's steel industry great again.


    HIBBING, MINN. – Coffee-scented steam drifted across frozen Carey Lake toward more than 200 ruddy-cheeked men, women and children hunched over holes in the ice, waiting for the Winter Frolic fishing tournament to start.

    Inside an icehouse that doubled as a refreshment stand, Rotary Club volunteers fired up the hot dogs and chili. Outside, judges waited by a laketop fire pit to weigh fish.

    This Iron Range city has hosted a Frolic — a week of games, pageantry and Finnish-style sledding — since the 1920s. It’s a rite as old as Hibbing’s tradition of voting Democrat in every presidential election.

    This year, only one of those things happened.

    Republican Donald Trump took office with a promise to “remember the forgotten men and women of America” and to restore the “rusted-out factories scattered like tombstones across the landscape of our nation.” He swore he’d rebuild America’s roads and bridges and do it with American steel. He pledged to bring American manufacturing roaring back.

    It’s a message that’s resonating in this pro-union, working-class Democratic stronghold just beginning to shake off a global steel slump that shuttered half the region’s mines over the past two years and put thousands of Rangers out of work. And it was a message that tipped the Iron Range — and Hibbing, its largest city — to Trump by the narrowest of margins.

    Three weeks into his presidency, Trump is battling in federal court to close the nation’s borders to refugees from some countries. He’s also kick-started two stalled oil pipeline projects, nixed the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement and made plans to wall off Mexico.

    While thousands of Americans storm the streets, airports and courthouse squares in protest, Trump’s supporters here like what they see and hope he’ll honor his promise to make America’s steel industry great again.

    “I think it’ll be an adventure,” said Hibbing resident Cathy Baudeck, who, with some help from a roll of duct tape, had just administered first aid to a Frolic fisherman who’d gashed his leg with an ice auger. “We should just hold on and see what he can do.”

    Changing loyalties

    The sweatshirt under Debra Mayerich’s down vest pinpoints the Iron Range’s place in the world: “Somewhere north of Cotton and south of Canada.”

    Like other Rangers, the Hibbing resident is fiercely proud of her home in the North Woods. Generations of families have gutted it out here through recessions, steel busts, long stretches of bitter cold and the lure of job offers in distant cities.

    “We Support Mining,” read signs in the shop windows. “Mining Supports Us.”

    That loyalty to the land extends to their neighbors, their unions and the industry that drew their great-grandparents to this region 200 miles north of the Twin Cities.

    Until last year, that loyalty usually extended to Minnesota’s Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party.

    “We were from a strong Democratic family our whole life,” said Mayerich, who sat in the bleachers in the Hibbing Memorial Arena on a recent Friday, watching a hockey game with her mother and sister, Trump voters all.

    “The Iron Range was the DFL and [the DFL] was for family, it was for values, and they strayed away from that,” she said. “So we figured, ‘We’re going to go Trump.’ ”

    Her family wasn’t the only one — Trump shredded the DFL’s united front in cities and counties across the Range.

    He won Hibbing by seven votes. It wasn’t exactly a landslide, but it was a startling turn for a community of about 16,000 residents that hadn’t sent a Republican to the White House since Herbert Hoover in 1928.

    Itasca County flipped to Trump, too, while Hillary Clinton carried neighboring St. Louis County. Clinton held on to mining towns like Virginia, Chisholm, Eveleth and Keewatin. But Trump peeled off Grand Rapids, Hoyt Lakes, Gilbert and Tower.

    The same election also propelled Republican Sandy Layman of Cohasset, a former commissioner of the Iron Range Resources and Rehabilitation Board, into the Legislature, ousting longtime DFL Rep. Tom Anzelc.

    “Sometimes people feel hopeless. They feel as if government actions and policies are out of their control,” Layman said. “This last election was an attempt to take back control.”

    It had been a long time since voters here heard a presidential candidate talk about mining jobs with the kind of fervor Trump brought to the stump. Clinton, on the other hand, wobbled on issues such as free trade and the Trans-Pacific Partnership, and didn’t mount the sort of grass-roots outreach Iron Rangers expect from their Democrats.

    “She kind of took that area for granted, I think,” said Justin Perpich, DFL chairman for the Eighth Congressional District, who grew up in the town of Virginia, worked in the mines through college, and watched many of his childhood friends jump on the Trump train.

    “You have to give these Iron Rangers attention if you want their vote,” he said.

    Rangers like that Trump is not a traditional politician. They like the idea of a businessman in charge, someone who’s worked with builders and contractors and has gone through bankruptcies and setbacks, like the boom-and-bust Iron Range itself.

    “As much as people didn’t like him, I think the American dream is obtainable through him,” Mayerich said. “He’s moving. Look at what he’s done … already.”

    Turning it around

    The population on the Range is older and whiter than most of the rest of the state. The region attracts fewer new immigrants, and the taconite mines and plants that sustain its communities are vulnerable to the whims of distant global markets. In December, Hibbing’s unemployment rate was double that of Minneapolis.

    Almost everyone here has worked in the mines or is related to someone who does — or used to. The jobs pay well, but come with the knowledge that a layoff notice could come any time demand drops or foreign steel saturates the market.

    Greg Furin, a single father of two, had been out of work since August 2015 when the election rolled around. At the lowest point in the downturn, half the mines and half the miners were out of work, setting off a cascade of economic misery across the Range, where high-paying mining jobs support not just individual families but shops, restaurants and the regional tax base.

    “When people aren’t working, it’s time for a change,” said Furin, who has spent the past two months working toward an associate degree at Hibbing Community College.

    One by one, the idled mines — except for Keewatin Taconite, where Furin worked — reopened and rumbled back to life. Then, in late December, Furin’s call came. Keetac will be up and running in March and Furin will resume work as a shovel runner as he finishes up the final months of his coursework.

    Trump hadn’t taken office when the callback went out, but to Furin, his election felt like the start of good things.

    “It seems like once he got in, things kind of turned around,” he said.

    Dale Weinand, 60, pulled shifts for years at the old Eveleth Taconite plant, not counting the five years he was laid off during the global steel crisis in the late 1970s and early ’80s. He worked 15 jobs during that slump, sometimes ranging as far as Texas to find work. When the callback came in 1983, he still hadn’t run through his full unemployment benefits.

    Today, he works for the city of Hibbing, plowing streets and sidewalks. He sees a business community that could use some fresh blood and ideas along with new shops and restaurants.

    “Hibbing is an old people’s town,” Weinand said. “The people are older, even the stores are older. … We’re losing more and more people all the time.”

    Mayerich sees her town’s troubles screaming from the headlines. In one day, she said, the Hibbing Daily Tribune had front-page stories about murder, meth and a shooting. She’d rather see articles about new industry, high-tech start-ups, retail ribbon-cuttings and newcomers moving to town.

    “I think [Trump will] be good for the Iron Range,” Mayerich said. “He’s a man who says he’s going to get something done and he usually comes in ahead of time and under budget. … He’s a businessman, and maybe that’s what we need.”

    “Sometimes people feel hopeless. They feel as if government actions and policies are out of their control,” Layman said. “This last election was an attempt to take back control.”
    Rangers like that Trump is not a traditional politician. They like the idea of a businessman in charge, someone who’s worked with builders and contractors and has gone through bankruptcies and setbacks, like the boom-and-bust Iron Range itself.

    “As much as people didn’t like him, I think the American dream is obtainable through him,” Mayerich said. “He’s moving. Look at what he’s done … already.”
    Today, he works for the city of Hibbing, plowing streets and sidewalks. He sees a business community that could use some fresh blood and ideas along with new shops and restaurants.

    “Hibbing is an old people’s town,” Weinand said. “The people are older, even the stores are older. … We’re losing more and more people all the time.”

    Mayerich sees her town’s troubles screaming from the headlines. In one day, she said, the Hibbing Daily Tribune had front-page stories about murder, meth and a shooting. She’d rather see articles about new industry, high-tech start-ups, retail ribbon-cuttings and newcomers moving to town.

    “I think [Trump will] be good for the Iron Range,” Mayerich said. “He’s a man who says he’s going to get something done and he usually comes in ahead of time and under budget. … He’s a businessman, and maybe that’s what we need.”
    Unfortunately, rural America, your way of life is dying. You haven't lured young people to your area, you haven't figured out why start-ups are concentrated in urban areas, and you expect Trump and government to fix systemic issues that stem from your inability to step up and improve your communities yourself (while you complain about "big government" and "government overreach", no less). You whine about the loss of American manufacturing, then go shop at Wal-Mart. You keep dreaming, but have no plans to make it happen. And, just like with church congregations struggling to rebuild membership, when someone offers an ambitious, viable plan to improve things, you vote it down because it seems risky and would require severe changes to your culture. You want things to get better, but you want someone else to do it for you. You want your vision to be a reality, but it's an impossible dream and you won't put in the effort to realize it. Go fuck yourselves.

    The good old days are over. They're not coming back. Accept it.
    The old "boot-straps" argument yet again.

    The reason these communities cannot compete with the cities is simple - all the money, the infrastructure, the investment, the Government services, and the cultural life is concentrated in a handful of big cities. How does a small town compete with that level of advantage.

    Take internet services. If the USA is anything like Oz then once you get away from the big urban centers and a handful of larger rural centers then the internet is crap. In Dubbo which is a large NSW rural town there is a high-tec business that creates dental appliances - dentists send 3D files via the net and this business using computer-aided lathes and 3D metallic printing makes the appliances and ships them back.

    This business nearly failed because the internet in Dubbo was shit and delivery services from Dubbo were unreliable. Because there was no profit for anyone to provide decent services to Dubbo. In the end the government stepped in because the electorate that contains Dubbo was in danger of falling to independents so the business was able to stay rather than relocate to Canberra.

    But a lot of other region centers don't have the political clout to force politicians to provide them with the services they need to have a chance in heel of competing with the cities.

    I also wonder if the USA is suffering from the "old farmer" trend where in Oz the average age of farmers has passed 56 years. So in ten years or so we'll suddenly have no farmers beyond massive agricultural corps flush with Chinese money.
    Northern Minnesota is a great place if you like fishing, forests and harsh winters.

  5. #25865

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    Quote Originally Posted by W0lf Crendraven View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Lana Torrin View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by FatFreddy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Lana Torrin View Post
    Shocked... SHOCKED I tell you, that Trumpy hasn't lost his shit over fatty Kim.
    He probably got lost on the internet, browsing asian restaurant homepages and trying to find out via menu pictures what a "jong-un" is
    If he's smart enough to realize the best way to deal with best Korea is to just ignore it then I'm going to reverse my opinion of him...
    No, not only no but fuck no! There are millions starving in that country, the leadership is as bad as the Nazis or Stalin. Gulags, deportations and executions are daily occurrences for the people living there. The only reason why we haven't done anything yet is for diplomatic reasons.

    If Trump actually does something about those poor people he will have been a great president no matter what, but just ignoring it further is pathetic and weak.
    Oh yeah it's that fucking easy, is it? Just bomb them and change the regime, what could possibly go wrong.

    As somebody living in Seoul i can tell you: kindly go fuck yourself, you know nothing about the world. Sometimes 'doing something' substantial is the worst fucking thing you can do.

  6. #25866
    Dorvil Barranis's Avatar
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    I thought he was trolling, but with WOlf it is hard to tell


    US Tennis Federation plays nazi era anthem for german players at Hawaii federation cup


    http://a.msn.com/r/2/AAmR30q?m=en-us&a=1

    Honest mistake, or is alt-tennis feeling emboldened in the age of trump?
    Last edited by Dorvil Barranis; February 13 2017 at 05:21:43 AM.
    "Those who are skilled in combat do not become angered, those who are skilled at winning do not become afraid. Thus the wise win before they fight, while the ignorant fight to win." - Zhuge Liang


  7. #25867
    Rakshasa The Cat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dorvil Barranis View Post
    I thought he was trolling, but with WOlf it is hard to tell


    US Tennis Federation plays nazi era anthem for german players at Hawaii federation cup


    http://Germans outraged as U.S. play...0q?m=en-us&a=1

    Honest mistake, or is alt-tennis feeling emboldened in the age of trump?
    I'm outraged at your alt-urls.
    Are you an engineer? -- Quack

  8. #25868
    Dorvil Barranis's Avatar
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    Alt-fixed. Alt-thanks.
    "Those who are skilled in combat do not become angered, those who are skilled at winning do not become afraid. Thus the wise win before they fight, while the ignorant fight to win." - Zhuge Liang


  9. #25869
    FatFreddy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nordstern View Post
    The small-town delusions continue...

    http://www.startribune.com/iron-rang...e/413499243/#1

      Spoiler:
    Iron Range residents look to Trump to 'get something done'
    Amid the protests and legal battles early in the Trump administration, his northern Minnesota supporters hope he'll honor his promise to make America's steel industry great again.


    HIBBING, MINN. – Coffee-scented steam drifted across frozen Carey Lake toward more than 200 ruddy-cheeked men, women and children hunched over holes in the ice, waiting for the Winter Frolic fishing tournament to start.

    Inside an icehouse that doubled as a refreshment stand, Rotary Club volunteers fired up the hot dogs and chili. Outside, judges waited by a laketop fire pit to weigh fish.

    This Iron Range city has hosted a Frolic — a week of games, pageantry and Finnish-style sledding — since the 1920s. It’s a rite as old as Hibbing’s tradition of voting Democrat in every presidential election.

    This year, only one of those things happened.

    Republican Donald Trump took office with a promise to “remember the forgotten men and women of America” and to restore the “rusted-out factories scattered like tombstones across the landscape of our nation.” He swore he’d rebuild America’s roads and bridges and do it with American steel. He pledged to bring American manufacturing roaring back.

    It’s a message that’s resonating in this pro-union, working-class Democratic stronghold just beginning to shake off a global steel slump that shuttered half the region’s mines over the past two years and put thousands of Rangers out of work. And it was a message that tipped the Iron Range — and Hibbing, its largest city — to Trump by the narrowest of margins.

    Three weeks into his presidency, Trump is battling in federal court to close the nation’s borders to refugees from some countries. He’s also kick-started two stalled oil pipeline projects, nixed the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement and made plans to wall off Mexico.

    While thousands of Americans storm the streets, airports and courthouse squares in protest, Trump’s supporters here like what they see and hope he’ll honor his promise to make America’s steel industry great again.

    “I think it’ll be an adventure,” said Hibbing resident Cathy Baudeck, who, with some help from a roll of duct tape, had just administered first aid to a Frolic fisherman who’d gashed his leg with an ice auger. “We should just hold on and see what he can do.”

    Changing loyalties

    The sweatshirt under Debra Mayerich’s down vest pinpoints the Iron Range’s place in the world: “Somewhere north of Cotton and south of Canada.”

    Like other Rangers, the Hibbing resident is fiercely proud of her home in the North Woods. Generations of families have gutted it out here through recessions, steel busts, long stretches of bitter cold and the lure of job offers in distant cities.

    “We Support Mining,” read signs in the shop windows. “Mining Supports Us.”

    That loyalty to the land extends to their neighbors, their unions and the industry that drew their great-grandparents to this region 200 miles north of the Twin Cities.

    Until last year, that loyalty usually extended to Minnesota’s Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party.

    “We were from a strong Democratic family our whole life,” said Mayerich, who sat in the bleachers in the Hibbing Memorial Arena on a recent Friday, watching a hockey game with her mother and sister, Trump voters all.

    “The Iron Range was the DFL and [the DFL] was for family, it was for values, and they strayed away from that,” she said. “So we figured, ‘We’re going to go Trump.’ ”

    Her family wasn’t the only one — Trump shredded the DFL’s united front in cities and counties across the Range.

    He won Hibbing by seven votes. It wasn’t exactly a landslide, but it was a startling turn for a community of about 16,000 residents that hadn’t sent a Republican to the White House since Herbert Hoover in 1928.

    Itasca County flipped to Trump, too, while Hillary Clinton carried neighboring St. Louis County. Clinton held on to mining towns like Virginia, Chisholm, Eveleth and Keewatin. But Trump peeled off Grand Rapids, Hoyt Lakes, Gilbert and Tower.

    The same election also propelled Republican Sandy Layman of Cohasset, a former commissioner of the Iron Range Resources and Rehabilitation Board, into the Legislature, ousting longtime DFL Rep. Tom Anzelc.

    “Sometimes people feel hopeless. They feel as if government actions and policies are out of their control,” Layman said. “This last election was an attempt to take back control.”

    It had been a long time since voters here heard a presidential candidate talk about mining jobs with the kind of fervor Trump brought to the stump. Clinton, on the other hand, wobbled on issues such as free trade and the Trans-Pacific Partnership, and didn’t mount the sort of grass-roots outreach Iron Rangers expect from their Democrats.

    “She kind of took that area for granted, I think,” said Justin Perpich, DFL chairman for the Eighth Congressional District, who grew up in the town of Virginia, worked in the mines through college, and watched many of his childhood friends jump on the Trump train.

    “You have to give these Iron Rangers attention if you want their vote,” he said.

    Rangers like that Trump is not a traditional politician. They like the idea of a businessman in charge, someone who’s worked with builders and contractors and has gone through bankruptcies and setbacks, like the boom-and-bust Iron Range itself.

    “As much as people didn’t like him, I think the American dream is obtainable through him,” Mayerich said. “He’s moving. Look at what he’s done … already.”

    Turning it around

    The population on the Range is older and whiter than most of the rest of the state. The region attracts fewer new immigrants, and the taconite mines and plants that sustain its communities are vulnerable to the whims of distant global markets. In December, Hibbing’s unemployment rate was double that of Minneapolis.

    Almost everyone here has worked in the mines or is related to someone who does — or used to. The jobs pay well, but come with the knowledge that a layoff notice could come any time demand drops or foreign steel saturates the market.

    Greg Furin, a single father of two, had been out of work since August 2015 when the election rolled around. At the lowest point in the downturn, half the mines and half the miners were out of work, setting off a cascade of economic misery across the Range, where high-paying mining jobs support not just individual families but shops, restaurants and the regional tax base.

    “When people aren’t working, it’s time for a change,” said Furin, who has spent the past two months working toward an associate degree at Hibbing Community College.

    One by one, the idled mines — except for Keewatin Taconite, where Furin worked — reopened and rumbled back to life. Then, in late December, Furin’s call came. Keetac will be up and running in March and Furin will resume work as a shovel runner as he finishes up the final months of his coursework.

    Trump hadn’t taken office when the callback went out, but to Furin, his election felt like the start of good things.

    “It seems like once he got in, things kind of turned around,” he said.

    Dale Weinand, 60, pulled shifts for years at the old Eveleth Taconite plant, not counting the five years he was laid off during the global steel crisis in the late 1970s and early ’80s. He worked 15 jobs during that slump, sometimes ranging as far as Texas to find work. When the callback came in 1983, he still hadn’t run through his full unemployment benefits.

    Today, he works for the city of Hibbing, plowing streets and sidewalks. He sees a business community that could use some fresh blood and ideas along with new shops and restaurants.

    “Hibbing is an old people’s town,” Weinand said. “The people are older, even the stores are older. … We’re losing more and more people all the time.”

    Mayerich sees her town’s troubles screaming from the headlines. In one day, she said, the Hibbing Daily Tribune had front-page stories about murder, meth and a shooting. She’d rather see articles about new industry, high-tech start-ups, retail ribbon-cuttings and newcomers moving to town.

    “I think [Trump will] be good for the Iron Range,” Mayerich said. “He’s a man who says he’s going to get something done and he usually comes in ahead of time and under budget. … He’s a businessman, and maybe that’s what we need.”

    “Sometimes people feel hopeless. They feel as if government actions and policies are out of their control,” Layman said. “This last election was an attempt to take back control.”
    Rangers like that Trump is not a traditional politician. They like the idea of a businessman in charge, someone who’s worked with builders and contractors and has gone through bankruptcies and setbacks, like the boom-and-bust Iron Range itself.

    “As much as people didn’t like him, I think the American dream is obtainable through him,” Mayerich said. “He’s moving. Look at what he’s done … already.”
    Today, he works for the city of Hibbing, plowing streets and sidewalks. He sees a business community that could use some fresh blood and ideas along with new shops and restaurants.

    “Hibbing is an old people’s town,” Weinand said. “The people are older, even the stores are older. … We’re losing more and more people all the time.”

    Mayerich sees her town’s troubles screaming from the headlines. In one day, she said, the Hibbing Daily Tribune had front-page stories about murder, meth and a shooting. She’d rather see articles about new industry, high-tech start-ups, retail ribbon-cuttings and newcomers moving to town.

    “I think [Trump will] be good for the Iron Range,” Mayerich said. “He’s a man who says he’s going to get something done and he usually comes in ahead of time and under budget. … He’s a businessman, and maybe that’s what we need.”
    Unfortunately, rural America, your way of life is dying. You haven't lured young people to your area, you haven't figured out why start-ups are concentrated in urban areas, and you expect Trump and government to fix systemic issues that stem from your inability to step up and improve your communities yourself (while you complain about "big government" and "government overreach", no less). You whine about the loss of American manufacturing, then go shop at Wal-Mart. You keep dreaming, but have no plans to make it happen. And, just like with church congregations struggling to rebuild membership, when someone offers an ambitious, viable plan to improve things, you vote it down because it seems risky and would require severe changes to your culture. You want things to get better, but you want someone else to do it for you. You want your vision to be a reality, but it's an impossible dream and you won't put in the effort to realize it. Go fuck yourselves.

    The good old days are over. They're not coming back. Accept it.
    This is actually a good/interesting contribution; would like to read more about the small-town dilemma/delusion/whatever from resident muricans.

    spoiler for :bla:
      Spoiler:

    Countryside is dying everywhere, yet on the other hand a select few are making a killing and not that few a decent living (if you can send three kids to the city to go to university, you're doing p. well imo) with agriculture/wine/(high-quality) foodstuffs.

    At least it looks like the 'Farmer'/'Bio' ('Organic' for the US) trend has enabled those who are able to put in the time and (intellectual) effort to actually adapt, survive and sometimes even thrive on production/supplying surrounding gastronomy/selling at a premium in the city.

    And people from the countryside (at least here) usually own their house (duh) and the land it stands on, often have so for several generations and that only rises and rises and rises in value..

    Or maybe I am just talking out of my ass because I am romantisizing the :countryside:, could well be (wouldn't want to live there myself for the long run tbh, especially not as someone from vienna who can have the best of both worlds easily)

    In any case, we've been in dire need of a huge infrastructure initiative for the countryside as well, it is my firm opinion that investing in proper connections (smart and non-lazy people already use carsharing and whatnot; bus companies are currently busy duking it out over the market for long(er) distance) would give a huge boost.


    you vote it down because it seems risky and would require severe changes to your culture.
    Tend to agree here, tbh.

    Opinions from small-town americans? Really curious.
    Last edited by FatFreddy; February 13 2017 at 05:35:30 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by QuackBot
    Pastry.. That the best you can do?
    Quote Originally Posted by NotXenosis View Post

    M8, i have discussions that spam multiple accounts, you aren't even on my level

  10. #25870
    Movember 2012 Elriche Oshego's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dorvil Barranis View Post
    I thought he was trolling, but with WOlf it is hard to tell


    US Tennis Federation plays nazi era anthem for german players at Hawaii federation cup


    http://a.msn.com/r/2/AAmR30q?m=en-us&a=1

    Honest mistake, or is alt-tennis feeling emboldened in the age of trump?
    So they played the horst-wessel-lied?

    Damnit Germany get over it and sing the original Deutschlandlied.

  11. #25871
    FatFreddy's Avatar
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    Should just play Sportfreunde Stiller, everyone falls asleep on the spot, peace achieved!
    Quote Originally Posted by QuackBot
    Pastry.. That the best you can do?
    Quote Originally Posted by NotXenosis View Post

    M8, i have discussions that spam multiple accounts, you aren't even on my level

  12. #25872
    Joe Appleby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elriche Oshego View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Dorvil Barranis View Post
    I thought he was trolling, but with WOlf it is hard to tell


    US Tennis Federation plays nazi era anthem for german players at Hawaii federation cup


    http://a.msn.com/r/2/AAmR30q?m=en-us&a=1

    Honest mistake, or is alt-tennis feeling emboldened in the age of trump?
    So they played the horst-wessel-lied?

    Damnit Germany get over it and sing the original Deutschlandlied.
    Check YouTube thread, I already posted about that.

    They sung the first stanza of the Deutschlandlied. They didn't play the Horst-Wessel-Lied.

    Would have taken a moment longer for the Germans to realize what's going on if they had played that btw.

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  13. #25873
    root's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elriche Oshego View Post
    Damnit Germany get over it and sing the original Deutschlandlied.
    The Rapier is my love boat
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  14. #25874
    Approaching Walrus's Avatar
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    inb4 pedantic explanation of how groS and great dont really mean the same thing (ty herrJoeApplebyKindergartenfuhrer for that)

  15. #25875
    Miriam Sasko's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FatFreddy View Post
    And people from the countryside (at least here) usually own their house (duh) and the land it stands on, often have so for several generations and that only rises and rises and rises in value..

    Or maybe I am just talking out of my ass because I am romantisizing the :countryside:, could well be (wouldn't want to live there myself for the long run tbh, especially not as someone from vienna who can have the best of both worlds easily).
    You actually are talking out of your ass, at least as far as Germany is concerned. Real estate prices outside the large population centers have been dropping for years and only recently somewhat stabilized due to the ridiculously cheap money you can get atm.

    It's quite a bit of a problem for people who bought houses in the '70s and '60 and planned to use a sale to fund their retirement. You can get a structurally sound but somewhat run down old farm with ~2ha of garden remaining 90 minutes by car from Hamburg for <200k. Only along the well serviced train routes the prices are higher, sometimes by several 100%.

  16. #25876
    Kai's Avatar
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    Australia has a 'tree change' phenomenon that drives prices for locations that are commutable to a city. As a result rural towns ~60 mins or less from a smaller city see familys move in to raise their kids.

    But properly rural places are dying.

  17. #25877
    OrangeAfroMan's Avatar
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    Boise, Idaho isn't exactly a small town, but we're surrounded by small towns, agriculture, and rednecks/conservatives.

    I'd say the post is pretty accurate; people in rural areas here are the last to want to change anything and have completely bought into the gop, because they can't possibly be the freeloaders that are only held up by ridiculous [corn etc] subsidies and government intervention.
    Actually an '06.

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  18. #25878
    FatFreddy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miriam Sasko View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by FatFreddy View Post
    And people from the countryside (at least here) usually own their house (duh) and the land it stands on, often have so for several generations and that only rises and rises and rises in value..

    Or maybe I am just talking out of my ass because I am romantisizing the :countryside:, could well be (wouldn't want to live there myself for the long run tbh, especially not as someone from vienna who can have the best of both worlds easily).
    You actually are talking out of your ass, at least as far as Germany is concerned. Real estate prices outside the large population centers have been dropping for years and only recently somewhat stabilized due to the ridiculously cheap money you can get atm.

    It's quite a bit of a problem for people who bought houses in the '70s and '60 and planned to use a sale to fund their retirement. You can get a structurally sound but somewhat run down old farm with ~2ha of garden remaining 90 minutes by car from Hamburg for <200k. Only along the well serviced train routes the prices are higher, sometimes by several 100%.
    yeh, it was a stupid commonplace and it's depends entirely on location/circumstance/etc.

    I was just trying to be optimistic
    Quote Originally Posted by QuackBot
    Pastry.. That the best you can do?
    Quote Originally Posted by NotXenosis View Post

    M8, i have discussions that spam multiple accounts, you aren't even on my level

  19. #25879
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    Quote Originally Posted by Approaching Walrus View Post
    inb4 pedantic explanation of how groS and great dont really mean the same thing (ty herrJoeApplebyKindergartenfuhrer for that)
    Fuck you that was uncalled for. The translation is ok-ish.

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  20. #25880
    FatFreddy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Appleby View Post
    The translation is ok-ish.
    You're getting soft.

    Didn't even point this abomination (and I'm not talking about the capitalisation which is a completely inadequate substitute for the /sz, for our non-germanic friends):

    Quote Originally Posted by Approaching Walrus View Post
    groS
    Gros = an antiquated unit of measurement (12*12 units of [whatever]); also relates to en gros/en detail in french, from french grosse.
    Last edited by FatFreddy; February 13 2017 at 08:49:43 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by QuackBot
    Pastry.. That the best you can do?
    Quote Originally Posted by NotXenosis View Post

    M8, i have discussions that spam multiple accounts, you aren't even on my level

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