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Thread: M [USA Politics Thread] GA!

  1. #25841

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hel OWeen View Post
    ...but it's terrible in general and contrary to a free society.
    It isn't. Financial transparency, particularly when it comes to beneficiaries of corporate structures (i.e. people who benefit from the protection of the state) is one of the best things we could achieve as a society.

  2. #25842
    FatFreddy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elmicker View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Hel OWeen View Post
    ...but it's terrible in general and contrary to a free society.
    It isn't. Financial transparency, particularly when it comes to beneficiaries of corporate structures (i.e. people who benefit from the protection of the state) is one of the best things we could achieve as a society.
    full concur

    I could write an epic rantograph about all the fake transparency agendas my government has advertised in the past years, only to drop them like a hot potato the moment everyone didn't pay attention anymore. Buuut, I don't actually want to make myself feel sad at this late hour.
    Quote Originally Posted by QuackBot
    Pastry.. That the best you can do?

  3. #25843

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    A couple of months back I had the opportunity to play with the weak, thin, unenforced basic data the UK's Companies House has been gathering for the last 6 months or so. The shit we found with a couple of hours of basic graph analysis will keep a bunch of NGOs and investigative journalists busy for years.

  4. #25844
    FatFreddy's Avatar
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    maybe we all should really realise the collective power we hold and do more than just shitpost on obscure forums
    Quote Originally Posted by QuackBot
    Pastry.. That the best you can do?

  5. #25845
    Lana Torrin's Avatar
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    Shocked... SHOCKED I tell you, that Trumpy hasn't lost his shit over fatty Kim.
    Quote Originally Posted by lubica
    And her name was Limul Azgoden, a lowly peasant girl.

  6. #25846
    Joe Appleby's Avatar
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    I just had to check what the Companies House is. It's the corporation / company register in the UK.

    In Germany that is done by the Verwaltungsgerichte, administrative courts.
    nevar forget

  7. #25847
    Joe Appleby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FatFreddy View Post
    maybe we all should really realise the collective power we hold and do more than just shitpost on obscure forums
    It's what I usually tell people when they bitch about their vote not counting and politicians not doing anything for them.

    "Have you ever tried participating in politics?"

    You have no idea how fucking effective that is.
    nevar forget

  8. #25848
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Appleby View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by FatFreddy View Post
    maybe we all should really realise the collective power we hold and do more than just shitpost on obscure forums
    It's what I usually tell people when they bitch about their vote not counting and politicians not doing anything for them.

    "Have you ever tried participating in politics?"

    You have no idea how fucking effective that is.
    a) they shut up
    b) they get really aggravated?
    Quote Originally Posted by QuackBot
    Pastry.. That the best you can do?

  9. #25849
    FatFreddy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lana Torrin View Post
    Shocked... SHOCKED I tell you, that Trumpy hasn't lost his shit over fatty Kim.
    He probably got lost on the internet, browsing asian restaurant homepages and trying to find out via menu pictures what a "jong-un" is
    Quote Originally Posted by QuackBot
    Pastry.. That the best you can do?

  10. #25850
    Lana Torrin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FatFreddy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Lana Torrin View Post
    Shocked... SHOCKED I tell you, that Trumpy hasn't lost his shit over fatty Kim.
    He probably got lost on the internet, browsing asian restaurant homepages and trying to find out via menu pictures what a "jong-un" is
    If he's smart enough to realize the best way to deal with best Korea is to just ignore it then I'm going to reverse my opinion of him...
    Quote Originally Posted by lubica
    And her name was Limul Azgoden, a lowly peasant girl.

  11. #25851
    W0lf Crendraven's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lana Torrin View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by FatFreddy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Lana Torrin View Post
    Shocked... SHOCKED I tell you, that Trumpy hasn't lost his shit over fatty Kim.
    He probably got lost on the internet, browsing asian restaurant homepages and trying to find out via menu pictures what a "jong-un" is
    If he's smart enough to realize the best way to deal with best Korea is to just ignore it then I'm going to reverse my opinion of him...
    No, not only no but fuck no! There are millions starving in that country, the leadership is as bad as the Nazis or Stalin. Gulags, deportations and executions are daily occurrences for the people living there. The only reason why we haven't done anything yet is for diplomatic reasons.

    If Trump actually does something about those poor people he will have been a great president no matter what, but just ignoring it further is pathetic and weak.
    Quote Originally Posted by QuackBot View Post
    I see you have read nietzsche's little known work "beyond boobs and butts".

  12. #25852
    Donor Tellenta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lallante View Post
    The hostility this thread has descended to....
    You're still cool even though I snapped at you

  13. #25853
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    Quote Originally Posted by W0lf Crendraven View Post
    No, not only no but fuck no! There are millions starving in that country, the leadership is as bad as the Nazis or Stalin. Gulags, deportations and executions are daily occurrences for the people living there. The only reason why we haven't done anything yet is for diplomatic reasons.

    If Trump actually does something about those poor people he will have been a great president no matter what, but just ignoring it further is pathetic and weak.
    Lol, 'diplomatic reasons'...
    Are you an engineer? -- Quack

  14. #25854
    Rakshasa The Cat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lana Torrin View Post
    If he's smart enough to realize the best way to deal with best Korea is to just ignore it then I'm going to reverse my opinion of him...
    Better than that; during the news conference he only talked about standing behind Japan, no mention of South Korea. He is setting up his next round of negotiation with South Korea now that he's done with Japan.

    Doesn't look like he gives much of a shit about North Korea's tantrums.
    Are you an engineer? -- Quack

  15. #25855
    Movember 2011Movember 2012 Nordstern's Avatar
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    The small-town delusions continue...

    http://www.startribune.com/iron-rang...e/413499243/#1

      Spoiler:
    Iron Range residents look to Trump to 'get something done'
    Amid the protests and legal battles early in the Trump administration, his northern Minnesota supporters hope he'll honor his promise to make America's steel industry great again.


    HIBBING, MINN. – Coffee-scented steam drifted across frozen Carey Lake toward more than 200 ruddy-cheeked men, women and children hunched over holes in the ice, waiting for the Winter Frolic fishing tournament to start.

    Inside an icehouse that doubled as a refreshment stand, Rotary Club volunteers fired up the hot dogs and chili. Outside, judges waited by a laketop fire pit to weigh fish.

    This Iron Range city has hosted a Frolic — a week of games, pageantry and Finnish-style sledding — since the 1920s. It’s a rite as old as Hibbing’s tradition of voting Democrat in every presidential election.

    This year, only one of those things happened.

    Republican Donald Trump took office with a promise to “remember the forgotten men and women of America” and to restore the “rusted-out factories scattered like tombstones across the landscape of our nation.” He swore he’d rebuild America’s roads and bridges and do it with American steel. He pledged to bring American manufacturing roaring back.

    It’s a message that’s resonating in this pro-union, working-class Democratic stronghold just beginning to shake off a global steel slump that shuttered half the region’s mines over the past two years and put thousands of Rangers out of work. And it was a message that tipped the Iron Range — and Hibbing, its largest city — to Trump by the narrowest of margins.

    Three weeks into his presidency, Trump is battling in federal court to close the nation’s borders to refugees from some countries. He’s also kick-started two stalled oil pipeline projects, nixed the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement and made plans to wall off Mexico.

    While thousands of Americans storm the streets, airports and courthouse squares in protest, Trump’s supporters here like what they see and hope he’ll honor his promise to make America’s steel industry great again.

    “I think it’ll be an adventure,” said Hibbing resident Cathy Baudeck, who, with some help from a roll of duct tape, had just administered first aid to a Frolic fisherman who’d gashed his leg with an ice auger. “We should just hold on and see what he can do.”

    Changing loyalties

    The sweatshirt under Debra Mayerich’s down vest pinpoints the Iron Range’s place in the world: “Somewhere north of Cotton and south of Canada.”

    Like other Rangers, the Hibbing resident is fiercely proud of her home in the North Woods. Generations of families have gutted it out here through recessions, steel busts, long stretches of bitter cold and the lure of job offers in distant cities.

    “We Support Mining,” read signs in the shop windows. “Mining Supports Us.”

    That loyalty to the land extends to their neighbors, their unions and the industry that drew their great-grandparents to this region 200 miles north of the Twin Cities.

    Until last year, that loyalty usually extended to Minnesota’s Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party.

    “We were from a strong Democratic family our whole life,” said Mayerich, who sat in the bleachers in the Hibbing Memorial Arena on a recent Friday, watching a hockey game with her mother and sister, Trump voters all.

    “The Iron Range was the DFL and [the DFL] was for family, it was for values, and they strayed away from that,” she said. “So we figured, ‘We’re going to go Trump.’ ”

    Her family wasn’t the only one — Trump shredded the DFL’s united front in cities and counties across the Range.

    He won Hibbing by seven votes. It wasn’t exactly a landslide, but it was a startling turn for a community of about 16,000 residents that hadn’t sent a Republican to the White House since Herbert Hoover in 1928.

    Itasca County flipped to Trump, too, while Hillary Clinton carried neighboring St. Louis County. Clinton held on to mining towns like Virginia, Chisholm, Eveleth and Keewatin. But Trump peeled off Grand Rapids, Hoyt Lakes, Gilbert and Tower.

    The same election also propelled Republican Sandy Layman of Cohasset, a former commissioner of the Iron Range Resources and Rehabilitation Board, into the Legislature, ousting longtime DFL Rep. Tom Anzelc.

    “Sometimes people feel hopeless. They feel as if government actions and policies are out of their control,” Layman said. “This last election was an attempt to take back control.”

    It had been a long time since voters here heard a presidential candidate talk about mining jobs with the kind of fervor Trump brought to the stump. Clinton, on the other hand, wobbled on issues such as free trade and the Trans-Pacific Partnership, and didn’t mount the sort of grass-roots outreach Iron Rangers expect from their Democrats.

    “She kind of took that area for granted, I think,” said Justin Perpich, DFL chairman for the Eighth Congressional District, who grew up in the town of Virginia, worked in the mines through college, and watched many of his childhood friends jump on the Trump train.

    “You have to give these Iron Rangers attention if you want their vote,” he said.

    Rangers like that Trump is not a traditional politician. They like the idea of a businessman in charge, someone who’s worked with builders and contractors and has gone through bankruptcies and setbacks, like the boom-and-bust Iron Range itself.

    “As much as people didn’t like him, I think the American dream is obtainable through him,” Mayerich said. “He’s moving. Look at what he’s done … already.”

    Turning it around

    The population on the Range is older and whiter than most of the rest of the state. The region attracts fewer new immigrants, and the taconite mines and plants that sustain its communities are vulnerable to the whims of distant global markets. In December, Hibbing’s unemployment rate was double that of Minneapolis.

    Almost everyone here has worked in the mines or is related to someone who does — or used to. The jobs pay well, but come with the knowledge that a layoff notice could come any time demand drops or foreign steel saturates the market.

    Greg Furin, a single father of two, had been out of work since August 2015 when the election rolled around. At the lowest point in the downturn, half the mines and half the miners were out of work, setting off a cascade of economic misery across the Range, where high-paying mining jobs support not just individual families but shops, restaurants and the regional tax base.

    “When people aren’t working, it’s time for a change,” said Furin, who has spent the past two months working toward an associate degree at Hibbing Community College.

    One by one, the idled mines — except for Keewatin Taconite, where Furin worked — reopened and rumbled back to life. Then, in late December, Furin’s call came. Keetac will be up and running in March and Furin will resume work as a shovel runner as he finishes up the final months of his coursework.

    Trump hadn’t taken office when the callback went out, but to Furin, his election felt like the start of good things.

    “It seems like once he got in, things kind of turned around,” he said.

    Dale Weinand, 60, pulled shifts for years at the old Eveleth Taconite plant, not counting the five years he was laid off during the global steel crisis in the late 1970s and early ’80s. He worked 15 jobs during that slump, sometimes ranging as far as Texas to find work. When the callback came in 1983, he still hadn’t run through his full unemployment benefits.

    Today, he works for the city of Hibbing, plowing streets and sidewalks. He sees a business community that could use some fresh blood and ideas along with new shops and restaurants.

    “Hibbing is an old people’s town,” Weinand said. “The people are older, even the stores are older. … We’re losing more and more people all the time.”

    Mayerich sees her town’s troubles screaming from the headlines. In one day, she said, the Hibbing Daily Tribune had front-page stories about murder, meth and a shooting. She’d rather see articles about new industry, high-tech start-ups, retail ribbon-cuttings and newcomers moving to town.

    “I think [Trump will] be good for the Iron Range,” Mayerich said. “He’s a man who says he’s going to get something done and he usually comes in ahead of time and under budget. … He’s a businessman, and maybe that’s what we need.”

    “Sometimes people feel hopeless. They feel as if government actions and policies are out of their control,” Layman said. “This last election was an attempt to take back control.”
    Rangers like that Trump is not a traditional politician. They like the idea of a businessman in charge, someone who’s worked with builders and contractors and has gone through bankruptcies and setbacks, like the boom-and-bust Iron Range itself.

    “As much as people didn’t like him, I think the American dream is obtainable through him,” Mayerich said. “He’s moving. Look at what he’s done … already.”
    Today, he works for the city of Hibbing, plowing streets and sidewalks. He sees a business community that could use some fresh blood and ideas along with new shops and restaurants.

    “Hibbing is an old people’s town,” Weinand said. “The people are older, even the stores are older. … We’re losing more and more people all the time.”

    Mayerich sees her town’s troubles screaming from the headlines. In one day, she said, the Hibbing Daily Tribune had front-page stories about murder, meth and a shooting. She’d rather see articles about new industry, high-tech start-ups, retail ribbon-cuttings and newcomers moving to town.

    “I think [Trump will] be good for the Iron Range,” Mayerich said. “He’s a man who says he’s going to get something done and he usually comes in ahead of time and under budget. … He’s a businessman, and maybe that’s what we need.”
    Unfortunately, rural America, your way of life is dying. You haven't lured young people to your area, you haven't figured out why start-ups are concentrated in urban areas, and you expect Trump and government to fix systemic issues that stem from your inability to step up and improve your communities yourself (while you complain about "big government" and "government overreach", no less). You whine about the loss of American manufacturing, then go shop at Wal-Mart. You keep dreaming, but have no plans to make it happen. And, just like with church congregations struggling to rebuild membership, when someone offers an ambitious, viable plan to improve things, you vote it down because it seems risky and would require severe changes to your culture. You want things to get better, but you want someone else to do it for you. You want your vision to be a reality, but it's an impossible dream and you won't put in the effort to realize it. Go fuck yourselves.

    The good old days are over. They're not coming back. Accept it.
    Last edited by Nordstern; February 13 2017 at 03:40:36 AM.
    "Holy shit, I ask you to stop being autistic and you debate what autistic is." - spasm
    Quote Originally Posted by Larkonis Trassler View Post
    WTF I hate white people now...

  16. #25856
    Approaching Walrus's Avatar
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    is that addressed to anyone in particular? florida hick land is pretty densely populated fyi

  17. #25857
    Movember 2012 Elriche Oshego's Avatar
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    The iron range is in Minnesota and around lake superior.

  18. #25858
    The Pube Whisperer Maximillian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nordstern View Post
    The small-town delusions continue...

    http://www.startribune.com/iron-rang...e/413499243/#1

      Spoiler:
    Iron Range residents look to Trump to 'get something done'
    Amid the protests and legal battles early in the Trump administration, his northern Minnesota supporters hope he'll honor his promise to make America's steel industry great again.


    HIBBING, MINN. – Coffee-scented steam drifted across frozen Carey Lake toward more than 200 ruddy-cheeked men, women and children hunched over holes in the ice, waiting for the Winter Frolic fishing tournament to start.

    Inside an icehouse that doubled as a refreshment stand, Rotary Club volunteers fired up the hot dogs and chili. Outside, judges waited by a laketop fire pit to weigh fish.

    This Iron Range city has hosted a Frolic — a week of games, pageantry and Finnish-style sledding — since the 1920s. It’s a rite as old as Hibbing’s tradition of voting Democrat in every presidential election.

    This year, only one of those things happened.

    Republican Donald Trump took office with a promise to “remember the forgotten men and women of America” and to restore the “rusted-out factories scattered like tombstones across the landscape of our nation.” He swore he’d rebuild America’s roads and bridges and do it with American steel. He pledged to bring American manufacturing roaring back.

    It’s a message that’s resonating in this pro-union, working-class Democratic stronghold just beginning to shake off a global steel slump that shuttered half the region’s mines over the past two years and put thousands of Rangers out of work. And it was a message that tipped the Iron Range — and Hibbing, its largest city — to Trump by the narrowest of margins.

    Three weeks into his presidency, Trump is battling in federal court to close the nation’s borders to refugees from some countries. He’s also kick-started two stalled oil pipeline projects, nixed the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement and made plans to wall off Mexico.

    While thousands of Americans storm the streets, airports and courthouse squares in protest, Trump’s supporters here like what they see and hope he’ll honor his promise to make America’s steel industry great again.

    “I think it’ll be an adventure,” said Hibbing resident Cathy Baudeck, who, with some help from a roll of duct tape, had just administered first aid to a Frolic fisherman who’d gashed his leg with an ice auger. “We should just hold on and see what he can do.”

    Changing loyalties

    The sweatshirt under Debra Mayerich’s down vest pinpoints the Iron Range’s place in the world: “Somewhere north of Cotton and south of Canada.”

    Like other Rangers, the Hibbing resident is fiercely proud of her home in the North Woods. Generations of families have gutted it out here through recessions, steel busts, long stretches of bitter cold and the lure of job offers in distant cities.

    “We Support Mining,” read signs in the shop windows. “Mining Supports Us.”

    That loyalty to the land extends to their neighbors, their unions and the industry that drew their great-grandparents to this region 200 miles north of the Twin Cities.

    Until last year, that loyalty usually extended to Minnesota’s Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party.

    “We were from a strong Democratic family our whole life,” said Mayerich, who sat in the bleachers in the Hibbing Memorial Arena on a recent Friday, watching a hockey game with her mother and sister, Trump voters all.

    “The Iron Range was the DFL and [the DFL] was for family, it was for values, and they strayed away from that,” she said. “So we figured, ‘We’re going to go Trump.’ ”

    Her family wasn’t the only one — Trump shredded the DFL’s united front in cities and counties across the Range.

    He won Hibbing by seven votes. It wasn’t exactly a landslide, but it was a startling turn for a community of about 16,000 residents that hadn’t sent a Republican to the White House since Herbert Hoover in 1928.

    Itasca County flipped to Trump, too, while Hillary Clinton carried neighboring St. Louis County. Clinton held on to mining towns like Virginia, Chisholm, Eveleth and Keewatin. But Trump peeled off Grand Rapids, Hoyt Lakes, Gilbert and Tower.

    The same election also propelled Republican Sandy Layman of Cohasset, a former commissioner of the Iron Range Resources and Rehabilitation Board, into the Legislature, ousting longtime DFL Rep. Tom Anzelc.

    “Sometimes people feel hopeless. They feel as if government actions and policies are out of their control,” Layman said. “This last election was an attempt to take back control.”

    It had been a long time since voters here heard a presidential candidate talk about mining jobs with the kind of fervor Trump brought to the stump. Clinton, on the other hand, wobbled on issues such as free trade and the Trans-Pacific Partnership, and didn’t mount the sort of grass-roots outreach Iron Rangers expect from their Democrats.

    “She kind of took that area for granted, I think,” said Justin Perpich, DFL chairman for the Eighth Congressional District, who grew up in the town of Virginia, worked in the mines through college, and watched many of his childhood friends jump on the Trump train.

    “You have to give these Iron Rangers attention if you want their vote,” he said.

    Rangers like that Trump is not a traditional politician. They like the idea of a businessman in charge, someone who’s worked with builders and contractors and has gone through bankruptcies and setbacks, like the boom-and-bust Iron Range itself.

    “As much as people didn’t like him, I think the American dream is obtainable through him,” Mayerich said. “He’s moving. Look at what he’s done … already.”

    Turning it around

    The population on the Range is older and whiter than most of the rest of the state. The region attracts fewer new immigrants, and the taconite mines and plants that sustain its communities are vulnerable to the whims of distant global markets. In December, Hibbing’s unemployment rate was double that of Minneapolis.

    Almost everyone here has worked in the mines or is related to someone who does — or used to. The jobs pay well, but come with the knowledge that a layoff notice could come any time demand drops or foreign steel saturates the market.

    Greg Furin, a single father of two, had been out of work since August 2015 when the election rolled around. At the lowest point in the downturn, half the mines and half the miners were out of work, setting off a cascade of economic misery across the Range, where high-paying mining jobs support not just individual families but shops, restaurants and the regional tax base.

    “When people aren’t working, it’s time for a change,” said Furin, who has spent the past two months working toward an associate degree at Hibbing Community College.

    One by one, the idled mines — except for Keewatin Taconite, where Furin worked — reopened and rumbled back to life. Then, in late December, Furin’s call came. Keetac will be up and running in March and Furin will resume work as a shovel runner as he finishes up the final months of his coursework.

    Trump hadn’t taken office when the callback went out, but to Furin, his election felt like the start of good things.

    “It seems like once he got in, things kind of turned around,” he said.

    Dale Weinand, 60, pulled shifts for years at the old Eveleth Taconite plant, not counting the five years he was laid off during the global steel crisis in the late 1970s and early ’80s. He worked 15 jobs during that slump, sometimes ranging as far as Texas to find work. When the callback came in 1983, he still hadn’t run through his full unemployment benefits.

    Today, he works for the city of Hibbing, plowing streets and sidewalks. He sees a business community that could use some fresh blood and ideas along with new shops and restaurants.

    “Hibbing is an old people’s town,” Weinand said. “The people are older, even the stores are older. … We’re losing more and more people all the time.”

    Mayerich sees her town’s troubles screaming from the headlines. In one day, she said, the Hibbing Daily Tribune had front-page stories about murder, meth and a shooting. She’d rather see articles about new industry, high-tech start-ups, retail ribbon-cuttings and newcomers moving to town.

    “I think [Trump will] be good for the Iron Range,” Mayerich said. “He’s a man who says he’s going to get something done and he usually comes in ahead of time and under budget. … He’s a businessman, and maybe that’s what we need.”

    “Sometimes people feel hopeless. They feel as if government actions and policies are out of their control,” Layman said. “This last election was an attempt to take back control.”
    Rangers like that Trump is not a traditional politician. They like the idea of a businessman in charge, someone who’s worked with builders and contractors and has gone through bankruptcies and setbacks, like the boom-and-bust Iron Range itself.

    “As much as people didn’t like him, I think the American dream is obtainable through him,” Mayerich said. “He’s moving. Look at what he’s done … already.”
    Today, he works for the city of Hibbing, plowing streets and sidewalks. He sees a business community that could use some fresh blood and ideas along with new shops and restaurants.

    “Hibbing is an old people’s town,” Weinand said. “The people are older, even the stores are older. … We’re losing more and more people all the time.”

    Mayerich sees her town’s troubles screaming from the headlines. In one day, she said, the Hibbing Daily Tribune had front-page stories about murder, meth and a shooting. She’d rather see articles about new industry, high-tech start-ups, retail ribbon-cuttings and newcomers moving to town.

    “I think [Trump will] be good for the Iron Range,” Mayerich said. “He’s a man who says he’s going to get something done and he usually comes in ahead of time and under budget. … He’s a businessman, and maybe that’s what we need.”
    Unfortunately, rural America, your way of life is dying. You haven't lured young people to your area, you haven't figured out why start-ups are concentrated in urban areas, and you expect Trump and government to fix systemic issues that stem from your inability to step up and improve your communities yourself (while you complain about "big government" and "government overreach", no less). You whine about the loss of American manufacturing, then go shop at Wal-Mart. You keep dreaming, but have no plans to make it happen. And, just like with church congregations struggling to rebuild membership, when someone offers an ambitious, viable plan to improve things, you vote it down because it seems risky and would require severe changes to your culture. You want things to get better, but you want someone else to do it for you. You want your vision to be a reality, but it's an impossible dream and you won't put in the effort to realize it. Go fuck yourselves.

    The good old days are over. They're not coming back. Accept it.
    The old "boot-straps" argument yet again.

    The reason these communities cannot compete with the cities is simple - all the money, the infrastructure, the investment, the Government services, and the cultural life is concentrated in a handful of big cities. How does a small town compete with that level of advantage.

    Take internet services. If the USA is anything like Oz then once you get away from the big urban centers and a handful of larger rural centers then the internet is crap. In Dubbo which is a large NSW rural town there is a high-tec business that creates dental appliances - dentists send 3D files via the net and this business using computer-aided lathes and 3D metallic printing makes the appliances and ships them back.

    This business nearly failed because the internet in Dubbo was shit and delivery services from Dubbo were unreliable. Because there was no profit for anyone to provide decent services to Dubbo. In the end the government stepped in because the electorate that contains Dubbo was in danger of falling to independents so the business was able to stay rather than relocate to Canberra.

    But a lot of other region centers don't have the political clout to force politicians to provide them with the services they need to have a chance in heel of competing with the cities.

    I also wonder if the USA is suffering from the "old farmer" trend where in Oz the average age of farmers has passed 56 years. So in ten years or so we'll suddenly have no farmers beyond massive agricultural corps flush with Chinese money.

  19. #25859
    Donor Aea's Avatar
    Join Date
    April 13, 2011
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    Colorado
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    12,256
    Don't rural areas typically draw far more in subsidies and services than they pay in taxes?


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  20. #25860
    mewninn's Avatar
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    April 10, 2011
    Posts
    1,112
    You could have all the tax incentives in the world, and people still wouldn't want to go to that place.

    Why? Because no one wants to leave behind sushi rolls and enchiladas for a place that only has a TGIF's

    Companies know this, and they will have a hell of time attracting talent for that location. Everyone will apply for Seattle/Boston/NYC, but none for Give a Shit, MN.

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