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Thread: Virginia – U.S. House District 7 GOP Primary Results (Eric Cantor)

  1. #1
    Donor Aea's Avatar
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    Virginia – U.S. House District 7 GOP Primary Results (Eric Cantor)

    To provide context, Eric Cantor is currently the Incumbent in this seat and is the House Majority Leader (effectively the second most powerful GOP leader in the House). Very much an establishment leader who lost to a Tea Party Candidate, in an election with less then 100,000 votes.

    This is actually a rather shocking election for many reasons:
    - Entirely unexpected result unseating a very important congressman
    - Potentially a resurgence of the Tea Party
    - Consequence of a very small election that very few people even bother with (significantly less important then mid-term elections)
    - Potentially lost over immigration and budget issues (see point #2)

    Your thoughts?

    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/11/us...mary.html?_r=0
    In one of the most stunning primary election upsets in congressional history, the House majority leader, Eric Cantor, Republican of Virginia, was soundly defeated on Tuesday by a Tea Party-backed economics professor who had hammered him for being insufficiently conservative.

    Mr. Cantor’s defeat delivered a major jolt to the Republican Party — he had widely been considered the top candidate to succeed Speaker John A. Boehner one day — and it has the potential both to change the debate in Washington on immigration and to reshape the midterm elections, which had been favoring his party.

    With just over $200,000, David Brat toppled Mr. Cantor, repeatedly criticizing him for being soft on immigration and contending that he supported what critics call amnesty for immigrants in the country illegally. The Associated Press declared Mr. Brat the winner.

    Going into the elections, most Republicans had been watching for how broad Mr. Cantor’s victory would be, with almost no one predicting that he would lose.

    Mr. Cantor’s defeat — the most unexpected of a congressional leader in recent memory — will reverberate in the capital and could have major implications for an immigration overhaul.

    Mr. Cantor, who is in his sixth term, had sought to rebut Mr. Brat’s charges on immigration, using some of his $5.4 million to send fliers and air television ads in which he claimed to oppose an “amnesty” policy. But with significant help from conservative talk radio figures such as Laura Ingraham, Mr. Brat was able to galvanize opposition to Mr. Cantor in one of Virginia’s most conservative congressional districts.

    His loss recalled the defeat of Speaker Thomas Foley, who lost in a general election to a little known Republican, George Nethercutt in the 1994 elections that delivered control of Congress to the House. It is extremely rare for a member of leadership to lose in a primary.
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/...11f_story.html
    In a stunning upset propelled by tea party activists, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Va.) was defeated in Tuesday’s congressional primary, with insurgent David Brat delivering an unpredicted and devastating loss to the second most powerful Republican in the House who has widely been touted as a future speaker.

    The race called shortly after 8 p.m. Eastern by the Associated Press, and Cantor conceded a short time later.

    “I know there’s a lot of long faces here tonight,” he said to a stunned crowd of supporters in a Richmond hotel ballroom. “It’s disappointing, sure. But I believe in this country. I believe there’s opportunity around the next corner for all of us.”

    Brat’s victory gives the GOP a volatile outlook for the rest of the campaign season, with the party establishment struggling late Tuesday to grapple with the news and some conservatives relishing a surprising win.

    “This is an earthquake,” said former Minnesota congressman Vin Weber, a friend of Cantor’s. “No one thought he’d lose.” But Brat, tapping into conservative anger over Cantor’s role in supporting efforts to reform federal immigration laws, found a way to combat Cantor’s significant financial edge.

    “Eric Cantor’s loss tonight is an apocalyptic moment for the GOP establishment,” said L. Brent Bozell, chairman of ForAmerica, a conservative group that targeted Cantor throughout the primary. “The grassroots is in revolt and marching.”

    Others had a different take. Longtime Virginia Republican strategist Chris LaCivita said Cantor’s work to build the Republican majority had taken him away from his home district. “He spent days, weeks and months traveling the country, raising money to add to the Republican majority. What can be attributed to Eric in doing so is unquestionable. Unfortunately, it had a price.”

    Brat, an economics professor, was not considered a major threat until Tuesday night, simply failing to show up to D.C. meetings with powerful conservative agitators last month, citing upcoming finals. He only had $40,000 in the bank at the end of March, according to first quarter filings. Cantor had $2 million.

    But there were early signs of trouble. Brat exposed discontent with Cantor in the solidly Republican, suburban Richmond 7th Congressional District by attacking the lawmaker on his votes to raise the debt ceiling and end the government shutdown, as well as his support for some immigration reforms. At a May meeting of Republican activists in the district, Cantor was booed, and an ally he campaigned for was ousted as the local party chairman in favor of a tea party favorite.

    A similar revolt in the state Republican committee last year determined that the party would hold a two-day convention rather than an open primary to elect candidates in 2013. That decision helped gubernatorial contender Ken Cuccinelli II, a conservative hero who lost to Democrat Terry McAuliffe. Many establishment Republicans in the state believe Cuccinelli’s nomination cost them the governorship. The 7th District fight is a sign that the factions in the party have yet to unite.

    But a GOP strategist who requested anonymity to speak candidly cuationed against viewing Cantor’s loss as a win for the tea party.

    “This is what happens when you don’t tend the weeds in your backyard,” the strategist said. he went on to question Cantor’s decision to go up on television — a strategy that may have raised Brat’s profile and let more voters know about the race. “Six weeks ago, Brat was an unknown. The question will be: Did the campaign overreact?”

    A seemingly critical issue for Cantor was immigration. The majority leader had championed a Republican version of the Dream Act, which would enable some undocumented immigrants who entered the country as children to qualify for in-state college tuition rates. Although Cantor never brought the legislation to the House floor, his support for the idea irritated staunch opponents of immigration reform.

    The strategist also noted that Republicans will study Tuesday’s results carefully for signs of Democratic crossover, but anecdotally, he did not hear that was a real issue. “People always talk about that, but it hasn’t ever materialized.”

    Since his days in the Virginia legislature, Cantor has been on the side of the pro-business, establishment. But he began to forge ties with the tea party in 2010, positioning himself as a conservative counterweight to House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) after the movement helped sweep Republicans into power. Yet tea party activists in his own district have never embraced him.

    Cantor has taken the primary threat seriously, attacking Brat in television ads and boasting in mailers that he blocked “amnesty” for illegal immigrants on Capitol Hill.

    Cantor addressed the crowd for about four minutes, thanking supporters and saying he would continue to “fight for the conservative cause.”

    Cantor quickly exited the ballroom for a waiting SUV, ignoring questions from reporters.

    But to add to the drama of the evening, after Cantor left, immigration activists stormed the ballroom, screaming and waving a flag. “What do we want? Immigration reform! When do we want it? Now!”

    A Spanish-speaking hotel employee took the microphone Cantor had used and told the protestors in Spanish that the police were on their way.

    The winner of the GOP primary will face Democratic Party nominee Jack Trammell — a professor at Randolph-Macon College, the same school where Brat works — in the general election this fall.


    Mike DeBonis, Laura Vozzella, Jenna Portnoy, Rachel Weiner and Victoria St. Martin contributed to this report.

  2. #2
    Donor AmaNutin's Avatar
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    I just read this article before I saw this thread. Exact same words.

    tbh, if the GOP alienates more moderates, that's okay.
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    I find it incredible that a whole country can actually be more retarded than FHC.

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    Dorvil Barranis's Avatar
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    Good bye immigration reform. As Cantor was widely anticipated to be the next speaker, I wonder just who they are gonna get to replace Boehner, and just how far out there the replacement might be.

    One theory is that districts are getting gerrymandered to the point that they are too right wing to support the establishment republicans any more.
    "Those who are skilled in combat do not become angered, those who are skilled at winning do not become afraid. Thus the wise win before they fight, while the ignorant fight to win." - Zhuge Liang


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    Super Moderator Global Moderator QuackBot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dorvil Barranis View Post
    Good bye immigration reform. As Cantor was widely anticipated to be the next speaker, I wonder just who they are gonna get to replace Boehner, and just how far out there the replacement might be.

    One theory is that districts are getting gerrymandered to the point that they are too right wing to support the establishment republicans any more.
    And that too.

  5. #5
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    Just one more match added to the slow self-immolation of the us conservative side.

    The longer this burns the longer the democrats can stay warm and cozy by the firelight with no national ideological threat to their ownership of the american middle. As an added bonus, democrats are suddenly in the running for cantor's traditionally republican seat so long as they can find a sufficiently right leaning democrat.

    Ironically, this show of strength by the tea party ensures that things like obamacare cannot ever be repealed, because no matter how driven or organized they may be they cannot do it without support from not just traditional conservatives but from moderates as well. They have neither so long as they keep attacking potential allies.

    The centerpiece of the next (democratic) president's term is likely to be what he can get done while ignoring the US house.
    Last edited by Synapse; June 11 2014 at 08:30:34 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dorvil Barranis View Post
    Good bye immigration reform. As Cantor was widely anticipated to be the next speaker, I wonder just who they are gonna get to replace Boehner, and just how far out there the replacement might be.

    One theory is that districts are getting gerrymandered to the point that they are too right wing to support the establishment republicans any more.
    The gerrymandering theory is an interesting one, although you'd probably have to look for evidence of the same on the left to confirm it.

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    Movember 2011Donor Cue1*'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Synapse View Post
    The centerpiece of the next (democratic) president's term is likely to be what he can get done while ignoring the US house.
    You mean she. Hillary Clinton is going to be the next democratic candidate I think.

    posted from my pants

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cue1* View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Synapse View Post
    The centerpiece of the next (democratic) president's term is likely to be what he can get done while ignoring the US house.
    You mean she. Hillary Clinton is going to be the next democratic candidate I think.

    posted from my pants
    *lack of a gender neutral english pronoun*

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    They?

    Sent from my PC36100 using Tapatalk 2

  10. #10
    SAI Peregrinus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by inora aknaria View Post
    They?

    Sent from my PC36100 using Tapatalk 2
    That's plural.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SAI Peregrinus View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by inora aknaria View Post
    They?

    Sent from my PC36100 using Tapatalk 2
    That's plural.
    You're right and wrong at the same time.

  12. #12
    SAI Peregrinus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tellenta View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by SAI Peregrinus View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by inora aknaria View Post
    They?

    Sent from my PC36100 using Tapatalk 2
    That's plural.
    You're right and wrong at the same time.
    Well, it's plural unless used with an indefinite singular antecedent, which the sentence under discussion does not have. The president is an implied definite singular antecedent, making 'they' inappropriate. The use of 'that' as a singular gender-neutral pronoun hasn't been popular since Middle English.

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    Super Moderator Global Moderator QuackBot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Synapse View Post

    The gerrymandering theory is an interesting one, although you'd probably have to look for evidence of the same on the left to confirm it.
    X i can make the original time if there's space in that one left.

  14. #14
    THE PUNISHED
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    English has no singular gender neutral pronoun. We make do with "they" or "them", but there's no single version.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ralara View Post
    English has no singular gender neutral pronoun. We make do with "they" or "them", but there's no single version.

    Henceforth it shall be Hem.

  16. #16
    SAI Peregrinus's Avatar
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    'That' was used in Middle English (well, spelled differently, the alphabet changed) and 'a' was used by Shakespeare in early modern English.

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    Liare's Avatar
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    why not use "it" ? it has the bonus of implying politicans are objects rather than beings, you know objects you can manipulate by putting quarters in them.

    my horrible attempts at funnies aside, assuming this is part of a larger trend to draw the republicans so far out to the right that even Hitler and Mussolini look like moderates could this finally be the point where a third party alternative appears ? and if so, would it be left or right of the democrats ?
    Viking, n.:
    1. Daring Scandinavian seafarers, explorers, adventurers, entrepreneurs world-famous for their aggressive, nautical import business, highly leveraged takeovers and blue eyes.
    2. Bloodthirsty sea pirates who ravaged northern Europe beginning in the 9th century.

    Hagar's note: The first definition is much preferred; the second is used only by malcontents, the envious, and disgruntled owners of waterfront property.

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    Straight Hustlin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Liare View Post
    why not use "it" ? it has the bonus of implying politicans are objects rather than beings, you know objects you can manipulate by putting quarters in them.

    my horrible attempts at funnies aside, assuming this is part of a larger trend to draw the republicans so far out to the right that even Hitler and Mussolini look like moderates could this finally be the point where a third party alternative appears ? and if so, would it be left or right of the democrats ?
    Wishfully thinking here: The Tea Party would rise as the farthest right; republican party will shed its crazier elements & fall more towards the center hopefully pulling in some of the more right leaning democrats. The republican party would gain a lot more voters than they will lose if they can stop pandering to their fringe elements. Honestly if they could move towards the center and adopt a truly libertarian position of social liberalism & fiscal conservatism; they have the potential to dominate US politics.

  19. #19
    Movember 2011Donor Cue1*'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Straight Hustlin View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Liare View Post
    why not use "it" ? it has the bonus of implying politicans are objects rather than beings, you know objects you can manipulate by putting quarters in them.

    my horrible attempts at funnies aside, assuming this is part of a larger trend to draw the republicans so far out to the right that even Hitler and Mussolini look like moderates could this finally be the point where a third party alternative appears ? and if so, would it be left or right of the democrats ?
    Wishfully thinking here: The Tea Party would rise as the farthest right; republican party will shed its crazier elements & fall more towards the center hopefully pulling in some of the more right leaning democrats. The republican party would gain a lot more voters than they will lose if they can stop pandering to their fringe elements. Honestly if they could move towards the center and adopt a truly libertarian position of social liberalism & fiscal conservatism; they have the potential to dominate US politics.
    This is also my form of wishful thinking. Ideally, the Tea Party would take the religiously centric voters and the hard case trickle down economic voters, while the Republican party would move more middle of the road. Hopefully, the Democrats would lose a few voters and members to the new middle of the road party, and we'd get a nice even three party system. Best part would be that because of our voting cycles, two parties would almost always have to work together to get a bill passed.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cue1* View Post
    ... Best part would be that because of our voting cycles, two parties would almost always have to work together to get a bill passed.
    Almost like a real parliamentary system.
    Quote Originally Posted by QuackBot View Post
    Canadians are usually cooler.
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