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Thread: Offshore pics

  1. #1

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    Offshore pics

    Might as well start a thread for all this stuff. Will copy my latest post in here, then go looking for all my older ones, trying to get them all gathered together.


    2013 J-lay campaign pics. Considering making a new thread for this stuff, what you think? Anyway, here we are in Pasir Gudang, Malaysia. This is the Sapura 3000, a multirole offshore construction vessel featuring a 9 station conventional s-lay firing line, optional j-lay tower, 3000 ton main crane and two 40t deck cranes. It's fucking neato, also big. This pic shows the main crane, port side deck crane and the j-lay tower.


    After spending some time in drydock in Singapore and undergoing seatrials afterwards, we head to Malaysia, swimming distance from Singapore, for the load testing of the cranes and the loadout of the vessel for the upcoming project. How do you load test a 3000 ton crane you ask? Well, you're gonna need one of these.


    Then you wanna check out the main block for cracks, grease everything up real well etc. Here's the main block.


    Now, remember that barge with the big wire ropes? Do you even lift?


    Two meters out of the water here. They pump water in and out of the barge to get the weight they want. The test was done at 3,400ish tons. The crane's control cab has digital readouts that are repeated on the bridge of the vessel, allowing the vessel to automatically ballast itself to keep from leaning or capsizing when the load is added or removed from the crane. Once everything is certified good to go, we start lifting. This is a stinger section that was just delivered, they test fitted it to make sure it would work with the vessel. This pic shows them setting it back on the quayside so they can finish it up. That would be the wiring, ballasting, valves, cameras etc.



    Some of you prolly have no idea what I am talking about. Oh well. You can try searching my other pics I have posted that explain a lot of this stuff. I will go into more detail on J-lay pipelay operations when we get into full production mode. I could explain it now, but without pics of everything in operation, pipe moving around, shit getting welded etc, it is really damn near impossible to paint a picture of it for you. Enjoy.

    ps. Oh yeah, sorry about image quality. My camera took a chemical bath and I am having to use my phone. I might be able to get some good pics from the engineers later.

  2. #2
    Movember 2011 RazoR's Avatar
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    Mate didn't you have a bunch of other ~engineering~ photos?

  3. #3

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    Old post, copying over from the image thread.

    Big crane block, right?


    Wrong.


    Someone said something along the lines of wanting pictures involving rust, offshore, oilfield, helicopters etc. Done.


    Ultra deep water pipeline? You need one of these to put it in.


    First you gotta load it though. Here's the initial pulling head being connected. For reference, that is 7" heavy wall steel pipe with 2" polypropylene insulation coating.


    Ok, all loaded up, time to head out. Bound for the Gulf of Mexico, approximately 7000' water depth, south of Alabama.


    Less than a month later, all the pipe is gone! 2 PLETs, several miles of flowline, 2 SCRs all gone.

  4. #4

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    'Hey man, how much can you lift?'
    "4500 standard tons, why?"
    Platform decommission. Little platform, pretty old, took a battering in a hurricane. Was on the DB50 when it went over to take the topsides off.



    ROBOTS! Well, underwater robots anyway. These were operating at around 7000' on the project these pics were taken on, but are rated to go quite a lot deeper.


  5. #5

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    Why does the cable/pipe need to go so high up before heading down and into the sea?
    Because they have to do all sorts of stuff to the cable between the reel and the sea and they need the space IIRC.

    It's not cable, it's steel pipe. The tower serves several purposes.
    First, it either bends or straightens the pipe, depending on whether they are spooling up or spooling out. Here is a shot looking up into the bending machine.



    Second, it acts as the tension machine or braking mechanism. All that pipe between the vessel and the seabed is HEAVY, without a tension machine there it would unspool uncontrollably fast, wrecking pretty much everything. Sorry, this one is a bit blurry but it is a shot looking down into the tension machine.



    Third, they occasionally need to strap on buoys, strakes, and beacons or sometimes cut the pipe and weld on subsea installations such as PLEMs, PLETs, valves, manifolds etc. In order to do that, they need a work station. That is what the big box thing is, a big work station with decks that can open, tilt, slide up and down etc. First pic is a buoy being attached to the pipeline.



    This set shows strakes being placed on the pipeline in the top deck of the work station, then the straps are tightened with pneumatic tools in the lower deck. Keep in mind the pipeline is constantly moving the entire time from top (spool side) to bottom (sea bed). At full blast we managed to keep up a 10-12 meter per minute pipe movement rate. If you fuck up and they have to stop spooling, everyone on the crew gives you a massive dose of shit talking.






    The entire tower can slide from left to right (port to starboard) and can tilt from 90 degrees down to I think 30 degrees. That last number I am pulling out of my ass, I cannot remember the exact figure. The tilt allows the ship to roll up pre-fabricated stalks of pipe from shore based installations. Here's a shot of the same vessel in port spooling up several miles worth of pipe, see how the tower is tilted? Walls, they become floors!



    How much pipe can it hold? Well, that depends on the size of the pipe really. This vessel can handle pipe up to 20" OD. I think. Again, I can't remember the exact figure. Here's an idea of how many stalks we fabricated. Keep in mind, each one is 3/4 of a mile long and I think we ran 55+ stalks.

  6. #6

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    So S-lay barges are like an assembly line. At the front of the line, the line-up stall! This first pic is a bit more complicated as it was what we call a pipe-in-pipe job. It was an 8" steel pipe inside of a 12" steel pipe with a 4" piggyback pipeline strapped on the top. Here you see the 8" has already been welded and the 12" is being lined up. The yellow structural stuff is the skeleton of a valve assembly that goes on the terminating end of the pipeline. This is actually the last bit of pipe on the line to go in the water. The view angle is from aft to forward.


    3 more stalls of welders and the weld is finished, giving you something that looks like this next picture. This weld has already been scanned with ultrasound to assure quality and we are putting the finishing touches on prep work to go into the coating stalls. The plastic coating has been buffed clean and the steel itself has been grit blasted to a white metal state. Can't really show you the ultrasound scanning head they use, they were using a new phased array setup and were dicks about pictures.


    Here's the machine we use to grit blast. It's fully automated, just lower it into place and press start and it goes round and round and gives you a clean pipe. In order to make it less messy, it also vacuums up everything it blasts off the pipe, rust, blast media, pieces of tape, paint, whatever comes off gets sucked up. This means we do not have to wear full on air supply blast helmets and shit, god I hate those things. Big ribbed hose is recovery/vacuum and the smaller one is auger or blast line.


    Next station is induction heating and FBE application. FBE stands for fusion bonded epoxy, just a technical term for powder coating. Pipe is heated up to around 240 degrees C (I dunno how to make the little degrees circle thing, bite me) then the powder is sprayed on in an even coat until desired thickness is achieved. This step was messy on this job, the pipe specs they sent us did not actually match the pipe, so our automated powder application was a no go and we did it manually.
    Heating. Notice the tension machine in the background, that keeps the pipe in place as we work on it


    Spraying! Fuck yeah it's messy, and breathing that shit is a bad idea.


    Once the weld goes through the tensioner it gets prepped for infill. In this case the external pipe insulation is GSPU which stands for glass syntactic polyurethane. Also a very bad idea to breath this shit, it is polyurethane with glass microspheres imbedded into it. We run an angle grinder with special abrasive pads to clean it and rough up the surface. This station is actually between two tension machines.


    Next station is where I work. I specialize in solid polyurethane injection molding. These pictures show pre-heat, primer brush coat, injection mold, post heat and finished product. I've got a lot of these because this is what I do obviously.







    Some of you may have noticed a smaller white pipe in these pictures. That is the 4" piggy back I mentioned earlier. It gets the same treatment as the larger pipe, line up, welding, nondestructive testing (x-ray in this case as opposed to ultrasound), media blasting, then a badass heat shrink sleeve. These pics are the heat shrink sleeve being applied. They actually had to cut a hole in the wall of the firing line for the 4" to go through. Behind these guys is the second tension machine. The pictures show a primer coat being applied, the sleeve itself being applied, then a high voltage holiday detector test that looks for tiny gaps in the coating. If you are dumb enough to touch the end that goes on the pipe it WILL shock the fuck out of you, speaking from experience here.





    Once the 4" curves into place correctly it is strapped onto the top of the 12" pipe to hold it in place. The 'curving' usually involves lots of rollers, hoists, straps and cursing. Pipe bends, but not without some persuasion. The reddish pink stuff is a weld that had polypropylene(PP) injected on top of it instead of polyurethane(PU). PP needs a cold water quench, which you see here, in order to harden it enough to go over the rollers that support the pipe without massive deformation.


    So, now we are at the back end of the barge and the pipe is going in the water. In order to keep it from buckling and generally fucking things up, there is a piece of equipment on the back of the barge that keeps the pipe in a certain shape. It is semi-submersible and has lots of rollers, cameras, ballasting etc to achieve this. We call it the stinger. Here's what that looks like from above. If you viewed the pipeline in profile, and the if the barge were transparent, the pipe makes a large, gentle S curve from the lineup stall to the seabed, giving you the term S-lay.


    To round things off, have some obligatory rusty offshore installation


    Hope you guys like your daily allowance of rust and industrial silliness. I actually managed to pull all of these pictures from the same project. You'll notice the outer covering on the pipes changes several times (or maybe you won't). This is a good example of poor engineering. The entire project was a rush job, less than 5 years planning from start to finish

  7. #7

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    Pile driving operations! Su Tu Vang jacket installation in Vietnam. When the piledrivers are operating the entire barge rings like a bell, hard to get any sleep.


    Su Tu Vang platform topsides in place, with an old rusty jackup rig next to it.


    Same platform and jackup, with divers working on the stinger in the foreground


    Pipeliner morning, out in the stalk racks around dawn.


    Bend testing, lets see what kinda punishment that sucker can take


    Jacket installation, maybe Indonesia?


    Me, dressed for work. No sunburn or getting too dirty

  8. #8
    Donor cheeba's Avatar
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    These are awesome to see

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    Here's a platform topsides we set in Thailand last year. First step, hook up the derrick crane and cut it loose from the transport barge


    Step two, lift that puppy and move it into place. Sometimes the topsides are so heavy they cannot rotate the crane and they do everything off the rear of the barge, moving the barge itself to position correctly. This one is pretty small though so they can rotate freely with just a bit of ballast adjustment.


    Step three, stab it into place! Once in place they typically spend a few days welding the legs to the topsides, then blasting and painting. All of that is done in tarped enclosures though so not much to take pics of. What do you think would happen to these guys if the line parted? I like this photo because it gives an idea of scale


    J Ray McDermott's DB101. It's a semi-submersible derrick barge with DP propulsion and anchors, commonly used for deeper water heavy lifts. This barge does not lay pipe. Interestingly, they rarely use the crane's winches to lift, instead they hook up, tighten, then ballast out to lift the entire barge up out of the water. I took this photo in Singapore a few years ago I think


    Also, the series of pics I posted of an S-lay barge earlier, I neglected to show the barge itself. So here it is, the Enterprise 3 owned by TLO. It's fairly new, though it is built on a design out of the fuckin 70's. This barge sucks ass, I've been on it several times and it made me sick every time. They run out of food and water on a regular basis too.

  10. #10

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    So, how about more rusty offshore shit? This is a short series as most of the detail pictures would be totally meaningless to you guys. First pic is the ship itself, the Falcon. It is an older vessel, and considered somewhat of a Swiss Army knife for pipelay. I took this shot as we were leaving on the crewboat, it's a bit blurry, sorry.


    Notice the tower on the ass end. This ship is what they call modified S-lay because it has a horizontal firing line like a traditional S-lay vessel. However, at the end of the firing line the pipe does not go into a stinger and into the water. Instead it goes up onto the 'wheel' and then back down into the water. Like so


    And another shot from a bit farther forward during the day


    This next shot is from up near the bow looking back at the PLET rack as we lowered the pipeline and 1 PLET to the seabed. Well, you could see the pipe if it weren't underwater already, hanging off the bottom of the big yellow thing that is entering the water. You can also see launching and guidance gear for the umbilical laying system (looks like a big white slide) and 3 white pipes sitting in the ready rack waiting to enter the firing line. Umbilical usually refers to the hydraulic, electric and fibre optic lines that run between platforms and subsea equipment to operate and monitor wells, manifolds, junctions, valves etc etc. This vessel has a huge internal reel belowdecks for storing umbilical, you just can't see it in this pic.

  11. #11

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    Work stuff. First is a picture of a startup pulling head, cable runs into the water to a deadman anchor, holding proper tension on the pipeline until there is enough in the water to keep it from dragging along behind the barge every time it moves.


    This is just behind the startup pulling head, it's a flotation buoy to aid in a pipeline crossing underwater. Water depth is only about 5 meters if I remember correctly, so they only use one.


    Welders. Here's a couple of my buddies doin the pipeline thing. First shot is Caesar, the Mexican Redneck, laying in the bead in the line-up stall with a TIG setup


    Morgan, aka Slackdaddy or Necktattoo, doing hot pass in stall 2 with a MIG setup


    Step up the pace a bit! Both of you fuckers weld at once!


    Over-the-side tie-in is complete. So here's some pics. First one is the davits and slings going into the water over the starboard side.


    Here's the divers coming up from an excursion on the bottom. They spent most of their time in the mud getting the pipe wrapped in the lifting slings.


    First pipe coming off the bottom here. That large white thing is what we call a pig launching laydown head. It can be loaded with multiple pigs and then when it is on the bottom they can launch the pigs individually by opening each of the valves and pumping water in behind them. Pigs are used to clean the inside of a pipe. They frequently have wire brushes that scrape rust and dust off the inside of the pipe after the line is completed but before it goes into service. This line has interior coatings though, so any pig run through it will be a plastic pig to avoid scoring and damaging that interior coating. This is likely going to be a freshwater line when complete.


    That platform was a bit small to be working on don't you think? Here, let's build something more appropriate shall we?


    Now the other pipeline gets picked up, this shot is from the bow.


    One end now gets cut off. It needs a flange to mate up with the stern side line, so we weld one on, custom fit baby.


    Flange installed, ultrasound scanning complete, internal and external coating complete. What next?


    Right, bolt that shit together! Here's the divers finally doing something, lazy twats. Hydro-tight insures all flange bolts are tightened equally. After this pic I went off shift and they dropped everything back into the water. Whoop tee doo


    This next pic is not mine, I got it from a buddy of mine cause he was on shift during the day, I was asleep when it was taken. This is a material barge with a top deck loaded being brought alongside the derrick barge in Thailand

  12. #12
    Donor cullnean's Avatar
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    Worst slide show ever

    Sent from my KFTT using Tapatalk 2

  13. #13
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    fucking awesome thread, love this industrial porn really. you might hate that barge but to me it looks simply awesome, reminds me of a spaceship being built. especially the handrails on the submersible parts :hnng: BIG RIGS love it. and topnotch welding photos, very good inspiration all around

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tajidan View Post
    fucking awesome thread, love this industrial porn really. you might hate that barge but to me it looks simply awesome, reminds me of a spaceship being built. especially the handrails on the submersible parts :hnng: BIG RIGS love it. and topnotch welding photos, very good inspiration all around
    True dat.

  15. #15
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    Great stuff. I hang around some pipeline construction for work (fish crossing monitoring) but it's child's play in comparison to what I this.

    I've never seen steel lines bend quite like on that pic with the spool. 7" heavy wall with 2" of poly on it? That's gotta put some stress on the steel.

  16. #16
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    This is a severely amazing thread. Wow. Just wow.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Izo Azlion View Post
    This is a severely amazing thread. Wow. Just wow.
    Agreed, my only regret is that I only 1 rep to give, back me up rep bros.
    yes, I am Le terribad at BF3


  18. #18

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    My dream is to sail the seven seas. But navigate or something.

  19. #19
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    expected thread regarding offshore bank accounts and tax havens.

    still not disappointed.

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by GetZonked View Post
    Great stuff. I hang around some pipeline construction for work (fish crossing monitoring) but it's child's play in comparison to what I this.

    I've never seen steel lines bend quite like on that pic with the spool. 7" heavy wall with 2" of poly on it? That's gotta put some stress on the steel.
    Yes, yes it does. The vessel has a dedicated engineer that does nothing but crunch numbers about the stress being put on the pipe as the spool/unspool. Factors such as temp, pitch and roll of the vessel, speed, water depth etc are all continuously monitored and input into his calculations. The project I am currently on is J-lay, 1200m water depth, 8", 10", 12" and 18" pipe, much of it heavy wall. When production starts I will get some good pics.


    Quote Originally Posted by Ravelin Eb View Post
    My dream is to sail the seven seas. But navigate or something.
    Interestingly enough, the name of that spool vessel was the Seven Oceans.

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