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NoirAvlaa
July 24 2012, 08:37:13 PM
This is a topic for people to submit links to websites, articles and name some books that would help everyone gain a better understanding of how politics and economics work.

I will endeavour to keep the OP updated with anything anyone submits as a source for information, hopefully in the correct place in the sections below.

So, please submit where you think is a good place to start to become educated on current affairs, political structures, economic models etc. Any source is fine, as long as it is truthful, any website that are caught to be willingly quoting false figures, inventing stories etc will be deleted off the list.

This isn't a thread to troll in btw, please just keep it to anything that could help everyone gain understanding of current issues.

Websites
Blogs
Books
Articles

General

World

http://www.aljazeera.com/ - Middle Eastern world news organization based out of and owned by Qatar. Generally unbiased when Qatar is not directly involved.
http://www.economist.com/ - Very information dense weekly journal, more fact-focused vs opinion. World-Focused (but mostly Europe and USA)
http://www.nationmaster.com/statistics - Good research website
http://mondediplo.com/ - Monthly magazine with a focus on international affairs and political economy. Arguably it has to be considered as left.
http://www.newleftreview.org/ - Bi-monthly journal, with a focus on politics, economy and culture from a socialist/marxist POV.
http://www.heise.de/tp/ - News site with clear links to sources, liberal - IS IN GERMAN
http://www.spiegel.de/international/ - Most prominent/famous German news magazine. Was most cited source in German media. Left.
Principles of Economics - Gregory Mankiw (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Principles-Economics-N-Gregory-Mankiw/dp/0538453427/ref=sr_1_sc_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1343337666&sr=8-1-spell) - Very highly rated book on Economics, author has other books on other areas of Economics for anyone interested.
http://www.statista.com/ - Lots of statistics (graph are free, sources required a paid for account) on over 600 industries.

UK


USA

http://www.brookings.edu/ - Non-profit, independent research organisation
http://www.rand.org/ - Non-profit, independent research organisation in the US.

Europe
https://www.destatis.de/EN/Homepage.html - Lots of raw facts and stats. German stats only

China


Rest of Asia


Latin America

Australia


Politics

World

http://www.cfr.org/ - Council on Foreign Relations
http://csis.org/ - Center for Strategic & International Studies
http://www.wsws.org/ - World Socialist Web Site

UK

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news - General stories about Politics and the Economy. Start point before going more in depth through other sources.
http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/ - Lowdown on UK Politics - CHECK SOURCES FOR ARTICLES FROM HERE
http://www.private-eye.co.uk/ - Ian Hislop's political magazine

USA

http://www.nytimes.com/ - Daily Newspaper. Start point before going more in depth through other sources
http://www.csmonitor.com/ - Liberal, focused on analysis and opinion. Start point before going more in depth through other sources
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/?country=US - Lowdown on US Politics
http://cnas.org/ - National Security and Defense
http://www.politifact.com/ - Unbiased, checks sources diligently
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/ezra-klein/ - Blog on events in Washington
http://www.truthdig.com/about/ - Current subjects and issues reports using field experts.
http://www.alternet.org/ - Non-profit media site that uses Independent Journalism.
http://www.nextnewdeal.net/ - Blog on current events that uses experts for their discussions
http://www.motherjones.com/ - Investigative Journalism website on current affairs.
http://www.propublica.org/about/ - Investigative Journalism Blog website on current affairs.
http://www.harvardlawreview.org/index.php - Student run journal of legal scholarship
http://www.zcommunications.org/znet - Far left, good for background articles
http://comment.rsablogs.org.uk/videos/ - Good for brushing up on gaps in your knowledge
http://www.opensecrets.org/ - Center for Responsive Politics. Lets you track (some) campaign finance income/expenditures for US candidates.

Europe


China


Rest of Asia


Latin America


Australia
http://www.crikey.com.au/politics/australia/federal/ - Australian political news site
http://blogs.crikey.com.au/pollbludger/ - The Poll - Analysis and Opinion by William Bowe. Statistics incoming
http://blogs.crikey.com.au/thestump/ - The Stump - Analysis and Opinion by Richard Farmer
http://www.abc.net.au/news/thedrum/ - The Drum - Analysis and Opinion by various ABC columnists

Economy

World

http://debategraph.org/Stream.aspx?nid=6637&iv=05 - Interactive, visual representation of global economy issues.
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/ - Blog with articles about world economics
http://crookedtimber.org/ -Blog with articles about world economics
http://economistsview.typepad.com/economistsview/ - Blog with articles about world economics

UK


USA


Europe


China


Rest of Asia


Latin America

Australia
http://economics.com.au/ - Multi-authored economics blog by academic economists.
http://johnquiggin.com/p - Economics blog by John Quiggin


Misc
http://www.newscientist.com/ - Science website, good for gaining an understanding of how some subjects can effect politics/economies (ie. Health, science related industries etc)


All links can be updated or removed if they are found to be giving false information or are discredited in any way. I will try and post accurate descriptions with every link and put them in the right place. If you spot any mistakes or disagree with a link being part of this then please let me know with the reasons. Debate on whether links are suitable or not are fine.

Layout will be changing constantly as I attempt to figure out the best format to lay this out.

When you submit a link can you please add a short description. Say if it's left/right/unbiased/other, what it's about (politics/economics/both) and how accurate it is (Good place to start looking/sources are dependable etc)

Last update to list:- 01-08-2012 @ 17:33

Aea
July 24 2012, 10:00:26 PM
The way I see it, there are two sides to this coin. There's understanding politics and economics and then there's the much simpler part of being aware of political and economical events. For the latter I strongly recommend:

The Economist - Very information dense weekly journal, more fact-focused vs opinion. World-Focused (but mostly Europe and USA)
Christian Science Monitor - Small weekly journal, contrary to the name is liberal and more focused on analysis and opinion. (Very US Focused)
New York Times - Daily Newspaper, No explanation necessary

Tarminic
July 24 2012, 10:05:22 PM
I've occasionally referenced a site called DebateGraph - it takes various debates and then visualizes the topics, subtopics, supporting arguments, etc. An example: http://debategraph.org/Stream.aspx?nid=6637&iv=05

Rans
July 24 2012, 10:08:13 PM
The only way to do it is by reading a lot and from very varied sources. Read from mostly liberal sources, you will have a strong liberal bias, etc which means you're not knowledgeable at all.

So take the biggest 2-3 serious news agencies in each of the big european/american/asian countries.

Tarminic
July 24 2012, 10:22:04 PM
The only way to do it is by reading a lot and from very varied sources. Read from mostly liberal sources, you will have a strong liberal bias, etc which means you're not knowledgeable at all.

So take the biggest 2-3 serious news agencies in each of the big european/american/asian countries.
I would add a few things to that:

1. Make sure you're reading reports and not editorials. Often news websites do not do an especially good job of distinguishing between the two.

2. Don't give the people with whom you agree a free pass on citing their sources. There are a lot of claims that can be researched and verified fairly easily, especially when they involve numbers.

3. Make sure your sources are reliable. Don't ever cite blogs, cite the information blogs are citing. If you can't find the information a blog is using, I advise against taking it without a few grains of salt. Same with Wikipedia - added bonus that when you give your sources people can't go "herp derp anyone can edit wikipedia". Wikipedia is a clearinghouse of sources, after all.

inora aknaria
July 24 2012, 11:45:51 PM
I'll second the fact that the economist is a great way to stay current with world news. I used to read it cover to cover, but unfortunently I slowly stopped making the time and I now feel less able to have a discussion about or explain to other people about world / economic issues.

tapatalk

FourFiftyFour
July 25 2012, 12:27:56 AM
Fact check everything.

Doublespeak is hugely prevalent in today's media.

F*** My Aunt Rita
July 25 2012, 12:35:01 AM
Unless you read the things that aren't about economics, the economist is right up there with zerohedge except with better editing.

Qwert
July 25 2012, 03:45:16 AM
Seconding Al Jazeera (http://www.aljazeera.com/) for world news. They tend to be fairly neutral when Qatar isn't directly involved.

lubica
July 25 2012, 07:01:49 AM
I like www.huffingtonpost.com for the lowdown on US politics, but I can't stand listening to my own country's politicians for more than 2 minutes, before I feel the urge to break shit.

http://www.politifact.com/ -> is a pretty damn good and unbiased (as far as I can tell) resource. It won't be the first site with a breaking story or anything, but they do check their (and everybody elses) sources very diligently.

http://www.nationmaster.com/statistics - good site for data research, though not the one I wanted to link...

Rans
July 25 2012, 08:37:01 AM
Let me give you an example of a very bad newspaper with a very good reputation: The Guardian in the UK.

Reed Tiburon
July 25 2012, 08:52:44 AM
toomanyspoilers


I like www.huffingtonpost.com for the lowdown on US politics, but I can't stand listening to my own country's politicians for more than 2 minutes, before I feel the urge to break shit.
HuffPo is the equivalent of a political tabloid and tbh I wouldn't trust anything they write without two more sources

some good IR / foreign policy thinktanks:
http://www.cfr.org/ - Council on Foreign Relations
http://csis.org/ - Center for Strategic and Intl Studies
http://cnas.org/ - national security and defense stuff
http://www.brookings.edu/
http://www.rand.org/ - analysis on everything

Rudolf Miller
July 25 2012, 11:40:51 AM
I regularly read the Wall Street Journal (which admittedly is a Murdoch owned publication, for now) because in terms of it's economic reporting, it is still top notch. If you want to read about dollars and cents happenings of markets and individual companies, it tends to be very unbiased and in depth.

However, anything political and especially editorial needs to be taken with a massive grain of salt, as there isn't a line they won't cross like claiming the internet was invented by private businesses and not massive amounts of government research grants (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10000872396390444464304577539063008406518.html?m od=WSJ_hp_mostpop_read)

untilted
July 25 2012, 11:45:47 AM
Le Monde Diplmatique - mondediplo.com / www.monde-diplomatique.fr / www.monde-diplomatique.de
monthly magazine with a focus on international affairs and political economy ... often putting a spotlight on not-so-talked about areas of the world. arguably it has to be considered as left.

New Left Review - http://www.newleftreview.org/
bi-monthly journal, with a focus on politics, economy and culture from a socialist/marxist POV.

NoirAvlaa
July 25 2012, 05:14:16 PM
Updated. At the moment the updates are basically copy/paste of what you're all putting up there, trying to get them in the "right" place. Let me know about any mistakes.

Also, let me know if the spoilers are a bad way to organise the lists and I'll try and think up a better way. I just didn't want the OP to take up 10feet of scrolling, and for it to be easy to find "UK Politics" or "Chinese Economics" etc depending on what you want to read up on.

lubica
July 25 2012, 05:27:04 PM
Politifact is focused solely on USA, I think. You put it under 'Politics - World' which is not entirely accurate.

NoirAvlaa
July 25 2012, 05:36:29 PM
fixed

Aea
July 25 2012, 09:09:52 PM
I like www.huffingtonpost.com for the lowdown on US politics, but I can't stand listening to my own country's politicians for more than 2 minutes, before I feel the urge to break shit.
HuffPo is the equivalent of a political tabloid and tbh I wouldn't trust anything they write without two more sources


Couldn't agree more, and mostly (all?) amateur journalism.

NoirAvlaa
July 25 2012, 09:52:35 PM
I like www.huffingtonpost.com for the lowdown on US politics, but I can't stand listening to my own country's politicians for more than 2 minutes, before I feel the urge to break shit.
HuffPo is the equivalent of a political tabloid and tbh I wouldn't trust anything they write without two more sources


Couldn't agree more, and mostly (all?) amateur journalism.

Added a disclaimer for now, if more people chime in saying the same I'll remove it.

Reed Tiburon
July 25 2012, 10:36:21 PM
Updated. At the moment the updates are basically copy/paste of what you're all putting up there, trying to get them in the "right" place. Let me know about any mistakes.

Also, let me know if the spoilers are a bad way to organise the lists and I'll try and think up a better way. I just didn't want the OP to take up 10feet of scrolling, and for it to be easy to find "UK Politics" or "Chinese Economics" etc depending on what you want to read up on.

I think one level of spoilers max. nested spoilers suck

here's a good site for election circlejerkery / poll data: http://www.realclearpolitics.com/

F*** My Aunt Rita
July 25 2012, 11:20:59 PM
For general what's going on in Washington upkeep plus other stuff I look at:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/ezra-klein/

Economics:

http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/
http://crookedtimber.org/
http://economistsview.typepad.com/economistsview/

Lefty groupthink echochamber:

http://www.truthdig.com/
http://www.alternet.org/
http://www.nextnewdeal.net/
http://www.wsws.org/

Pro investigative journalism and other stuff:

http://www.motherjones.com/
http://www.propublica.org/

Hel OWeen
July 26 2012, 10:07:52 AM
First off, some (German) links. I'll save the (german-speaking) readers from mentioning the obvious ones like Sueddeutsche, ZEIT, Die Welt etc. Instead where available, I've linked and noted English versions of sites.

Germany/Europe/World (all topics)
Telepolis (German, with a few English articles in between) (http://www.heise.de/telepolis). Telepolis clearly has a (liberal) bias. What I like about it, is its linking to external sources (the real ones, not a blog that links an article which links a study). I find that important to mention, because over the years I've recognized the (for me) disturbing trend on traditional news sites to link to itself rather than to a real source. Which makes fact checking more different than necessary.

World (all topics)
DER SPIEGEL (English site, content differs from German main site) (http://www.spiegel.de/international/). (Still) Most prominent/famous German news magazine. Was for years the most cited news source in other German media, because they did some real (investigative) journalism. SPIEGEL is famous for his own archive. In the day and age of the Internet, the importance of this may haved changed. But they still got tons of non-digitalized stuff there. SPIEGEL once had a clear left/liberal bias, it's not clear any more these days, but I still would rate it rather left- than right-leaning.

Legal
Harvard Law review (http://www.harvardlawreview.org/index.php) (English, run by students)

Plain Facts, lots of them
Statistisches Bundesamt (Federal Office of Statistics, English version) (https://www.destatis.de/EN/Homepage.html)

Some comments:


Any source is fine, as long as it is truthful, any website that are caught to be quoting false figures, inventing stories etc will be deleted off the list.


I guess the implied adjective missing here is "willingly", because I don't know any news source that hasn't been in error at some point. The good ones acknowledge and correct it, the bad ones don't.



1. Make sure you're reading reports and not editorials. Often news websites do not do an especially good job of distinguishing between the two.


I agree and disagree at the same time. Yes, make sure you don't mistake editorials for reports (and vice versa). But I disagree to ignore editorials. Yes, there's always bias. But there's fact-based bias and "i-simply-hate-you"-based bias (an example of the later category, who I'm sure everyone knows: Rush Limbaugh). Avoid the later like the plague. Even more so when they seem to support your opinion. But an educated and fact-based editorial of the first category is often more insightful than a pure report. Because those editorials might cite little known "side-facts", you would never read elsewhere. Ofc. double check them.

Sacul
July 26 2012, 10:13:42 AM
Looking at the links i do not have much to add except:
Znet:
http://www.zcommunications.org/znet
(far left but good at background articles imo)

And if you are looking to brush up on gaps in your knowledge but dont want to read Barth type words:

RSA:
http://comment.rsablogs.org.uk/videos/

Lallante
July 26 2012, 03:16:03 PM
Read the Economist, Private Eye (if in the UK), New Scientist and The Week.

Do so consistently for 6 months.

Welcome to understanding politics and economics to a strong conversational level. Also you'll be addicted.

inora aknaria
July 26 2012, 04:26:47 PM
The economist online gives an rss feed that you can sign up for with your cell. Unfortunently it only gives the first 2 or 3 paragraphs of the article in the feed (i.e. downloadable / accessible without internet), but I've found it an excellent way to read a few articles while waiting for the bus etc.

elmicker
July 26 2012, 07:13:03 PM
I've never liked the economist for actual economics. It's staffed by historians and classicists and it shows. Great for international relations and politics, but they spent 10 of the last 15 years shouting from the rooftops for deregulation of everything under the sun, from banking to third world economies and are now doing their damnedest to pretend they didn't. I also intensely dislike the editorial style of the magazine, whereby all the staff pretend to be this one faceless mass to avoid the author rather than the content being judged. You know what? Sometimes I'd quite like to judge the author because they probably deserve it.

If you want to learn yourself economics, rather that just current economic affairs, you simply cannot go wrong with Mankiw's Principles.... Nice mix of pure theory, discussion and case study, the standard text for undergraduate economics right around the world. More than accessible to anyone with a basic grasp of common sense and mathematics.

NoirAvlaa
July 26 2012, 09:20:47 PM
Updated again. Large update. Can people help me out with the descriptions? For a lot of the websites etc I could only give the site a quick look and thus the descriptions aren't all that great or maybe wrong, I'm not entirely sure.

I'll start looking through the list when I have more time and remove/move anything that needs to be removed/moved. Until then let me know if I have anything wrong or if something shouldn't be on the list.

Trying a new format as well, going to tweak it each update and see if I can make it more readable. Suggestions welcome.

Qwert
July 26 2012, 11:27:06 PM
For Al Jazeera:
Middle Eastern world news organization based out of and owned by Qatar. Generally unbiased when Qatar is not directly involved. Tends to have pundits from both relevant parties; one example was a debate about Boko Haram (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boko_Haram) (Islamist militants in Nigeria who are persecuting Christinas) where they had both a Christian and a Muslim Nigerian to weigh in on the issue. Widely praised and received awards for its coverage of Arab Spring. Has both a 24 hour news network stream and web articles.

inora aknaria
July 26 2012, 11:29:07 PM
I've never liked the economist for actual economics. It's staffed by historians and classicists and it shows. Great for international relations and politics, but they spent 10 of the last 15 years shouting from the rooftops for deregulation of everything under the sun, from banking to third world economies and are now doing their damnedest to pretend they didn't. I also intensely dislike the editorial style of the magazine, whereby all the staff pretend to be this one faceless mass to avoid the author rather than the content being judged. You know what? Sometimes I'd quite like to judge the author because they probably deserve it.

If you want to learn yourself economics, rather that just current economic affairs, you simply cannot go wrong with Mankiw's Principles.... Nice mix of pure theory, discussion and case study, the standard text for undergraduate economics right around the world. More than accessible to anyone with a basic grasp of common sense and mathematics.

Just picked this up on amazon for $6 including shipping used. I've been looking for a good scimi book to review the college classes I took a few years ago

tapatalk

Sponk
July 27 2012, 01:08:13 AM
Australian Politics:

News
* http://www.crikey.com.au/politics/australia/federal/

Analysis & Opinion:
* http://blogs.crikey.com.au/pollbludger/
* http://blogs.crikey.com.au/thestump/
* http://www.abc.net.au/news/thedrum/


Australian Economics (as written by non-terrible economists)

* http://economics.com.au/
* http://johnquiggin.com/

Hel OWeen
July 27 2012, 04:22:14 PM
Updated again. Large update. Can people help me out with the descriptions?

For ...

General/World
[...]
https://www.destatis.de/EN/Homepage.html - Lots of raw facts and stats.

... i would add "(German stats only)"

A somewhat similar site, not restricted to data from one country, claiming ...


With Statista, you can access the most relevant and important statistics and studies gathered by market researchers, trade organizations, scientific publications, and government sources on over 600 industries.

... is http://www.statista.com/. Basic (free) access gives you results and graphs. There's a paid access option, too. It seems you would get access to the underlying studies, which the free version does not.

Added benefit of that site: provides HTML code to embed the graphs elsewhere. Sample:
http://www.statista.com/graphic/1/187020/dvd-sales-revenue-in-the-us-in-2010.jpg

Lallante
July 27 2012, 04:25:17 PM
How a single film DVD makes $1 for every 3 men women and children in the united states I have literally no idea.

Varcaus
July 28 2012, 03:34:55 AM
How a single film DVD makes $1 for every 3 men women and children in the united states I have literally no idea.

Movie cost more than 1$?

NoirAvlaa
July 28 2012, 08:24:30 AM
Updated with the aussie sites, added stats site, moved German stats site, renamed topic.

Worth applying for sticky?

Nordstern
July 31 2012, 11:39:26 PM
http://www.opensecrets.org/ - Center for Responsive Politics. Lets you track (some) campaign finance income/expenditures for US candidates. Pulled from public sources that are intentionally obfuscated to (try to) prevent sites like this from popping up. Most useful for determining whether a candidate is backed by individual contributors, organizations or industry, and type of industry.

Examples:
Americans for Prosperity (http://www.opensecrets.org/outsidespending/detail.php?cmte=Americans+for+Prosperity)
AFL-CIO (http://www.opensecrets.org/orgs/summary.php?id=D000000088)
Overview of Obama and Romney (http://www.opensecrets.org/pres12/index.php)
Keith Ellison (http://www.opensecrets.org/politicians/summary.php?cid=N00028257&cycle=2012)
Michele Bachmann (http://www.opensecrets.org/politicians/summary.php?cid=N00027493&cycle=2012)

All PACs (http://www.opensecrets.org/outsidespending/summ.php?disp=O)
All Super PACs (http://www.opensecrets.org/outsidespending/summ.php?cycle=2012&chrt=V&type=S)

NoirAvlaa
August 2 2012, 11:48:41 AM
Updated again.

Does anyone have links to resources in other parts of the world (Russia, Asia, Latin America)?

Hel OWeen
September 4 2012, 11:03:47 AM
Can someone comment on the credibility of http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php/SourceWatch? If the information presented there is valid, it looks like a useful tool for checking out people's hidden agenda.

Ralara
September 4 2012, 11:07:12 AM
How a single film DVD makes $1 for every 3 men women and children in the united states I have literally no idea.

how a film called "Beverly hills chihuahua" got made is beyond me.

That there was a SEQUEL ... :S

Hel OWeen
September 6 2012, 04:22:56 PM
And yet another worldwide pure statistics page: http://www.nationmaster.com/index.php. It provides links to the original source(s) of the presented figures. It also features comparison of two countries on a subject, example of a current FHC discussion: Immigration U.K. vs. Germany (http://www.nationmaster.com/compare/Germany/United-Kingdom/Immigration)