PDA

View Full Version : Programming Reference Books



elmicker
May 25 2011, 04:51:12 AM
I need to do some serious brushing up over the summer, and while I can easily find this stuff online, I like having a physical book in front of me to flip through, bookmark and read properly. I'm well up to scratch with algorithms, complexity and data structures, so I'm not looking for anything with a tutorial structure, nor am I looking for anything that goes into too much depth on the workings or syntax of the language itself, rather I'm looking for library references.

So, basically, I'm after a K&R equivalent for C++ and for Python, or for any other useful/interesting languages should you know a good book, c#.net or ruby perhaps. Oh, and design pattern books.

:)

balistic void
May 25 2011, 11:22:17 AM
I don't get it. Using internet is so much faster for looking stuff up. I only read books to learn various tricks and stuff, not as reference. Game Programming Gems best books, not just for games.

If you use Visual Studio just press F1 for help on whatever, works very well. Likewise Eclipse has java documentation built in.

elmicker
May 25 2011, 04:00:51 PM
I just like books :vov:

I learn things much better if when I have to solve a problem I take a step back, read an abstract bit of text and then come back to apply it than I do just pulling the relevant method from online documentation.

EntroX
May 25 2011, 05:03:35 PM
well, thats a very outdated way of thinking.

ebooks and search engines (plus the documentation itself like ballistic mentioned) will make your life way better~

Hast
May 25 2011, 06:31:29 PM
pretty much. Although when it comes to reading about stuff like architecture, best practices, how to not suck at coding etc. I prefer paper format and a good glass of wine tbh.

elmicker
May 25 2011, 08:05:39 PM
You know when someone goes to a forum and says "Guys, recommend me a laptop" and a dozen people go "fuck that shit build your own desktop it's so much cheaper!!!"

That's you lot.

Aea
May 25 2011, 08:12:26 PM
You know when someone goes to a forum and says "Guys, recommend me a laptop" and a dozen people go "fuck that shit build your own desktop it's so much cheaper!!!"

That's you lot.

:razor:

I have http://www.amazon.com/Python-Essential- ... 661&sr=8-1 (http://www.amazon.com/Python-Essential-Reference-David-Beazley/dp/0672329786/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1306350661&sr=8-1) it's mostly just a printed manual but I find it pretty useful (easier to thumb through, easier to just "read" if you want to learn about modules and packages you haven't really explored). Python is really lacking in quality documentation IMHO (or more specifically, the documentation is awesome if you can find it / know how to browser the python docs).

Mimiru
May 25 2011, 11:27:33 PM
Code Complete?

omeg
May 26 2011, 12:53:32 PM
For c# - C# 4.0 in a Nutshell - The Definitive Reference. It has everything.

EntroX
May 26 2011, 05:00:01 PM
You know when someone goes to a forum and says "Guys, recommend me a laptop" and a dozen people go "fuck that shit build your own desktop it's so much cheaper!!!"

That's you lot.

so bad

Warpath
May 28 2011, 09:47:26 PM
If you ever do want to snoop through web based stuff (or someone else may want to if you don't) just saw this site linked elsewhere.

http://qink.net/page/The-Ultimate-List-of-Freely-Available-Programming-Books.aspx